Haitians at USA/Mexico border

cavok

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Jun 16, 2014
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That is right of course. I am not sure about the definition. But is it legal the people facilitating them crossing borders illegally. What is the term for that then ?
They are called "coyotes" They work for the drug cartels who completely control the boarder. This has been a great business for them. It's estimated that a million illegals have crossed this year. At $10K each, that's a billion dollars for the drug cartels and much less risky that smuggling drugs.
 
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aarhus

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I wouldn't say "dirt poor". If you've ever seen dirt poor Haitians, you'd know even if they sold everything they have they couldn't come up with $12K USD.
Well they are dirt poor now because they spent it and maybe are indebted even. I think they own only the clothes they are wearing and the plastic bags they are carrying. I am not sure all these paid that much anyway. From reading about them crossing dangerous jungles and rivers etc doesn’t sound as comfortable as Cubans I have heard about paying around that.
 

chico bill

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May 6, 2016
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You need millions of dollars to buy a visa. Having 12000 US is not going to cut it with US immigration.
With 500,000 to invest you are welcome to the US with a green card in areas deemed high unemployment (other areas 1 million) and thousands of Chinese have been allowed entry with this amount of money.
Of the swelling numbers of Haitians entering none have half a million nor probably even $500.
Since they speak French I would think making their way to Quebec would be their best bet eh?
 

MariaRubia

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Jun 25, 2019
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I think the point of this discussion is that they are not Haitians with money or richer Haitians. They are all dirt poor. One just have to look at the pictures. And they came up through Latin America.
My point is that if they have a family of four and have paid $12000 a piece they are not dirt poor.
 
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JD Jones

Moderator - Covid 19 in DR & North Coast
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And then there's this: Pregnant Haitians who come to have their baby in the U.S.. Sound familiar?

 
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KyleMackey

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This video is even more troubling. A Texas border officer is seen supposedly whipping a Haitian.

Watched a video on DM nobody was whipped. BTW it looks like women with children most likely to get a pass.
 

Naked_Snake

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At this point the question everyone should be asking and that none has bothered to is: what is the point of Haitian independence, exactly?
 

aarhus

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My point is that if they have a family of four and have paid $12000 a piece they are not dirt poor.
From the article I think that was a Cuban family. I just don’t think many of the Haitians went on the “business class/first class” smuggling route.
 

aarhus

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When they got independence didn’t it seem like the right thing looking at history?

From the French you mean ? Who would govern the country if not Haitians ? The US ? I am not sure I understand the question from Snake.
 

Naked_Snake

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When they got independence didn’t it seem like the right thing looking at history?

From the French you mean ? Who would govern the country if not Haitians ? The US ? I am not sure I understand the question from Snake.
At this point that country should be put under a multinational trust, and not just on the military scale like it was with Minustah (which did control security on the ground, but didnt go further than that).

As for their getting independent being the right thing at the time, so what? Martinique and Guadeloupe tried to do so at the same time, yet they failed, but if you got to ask Martinicans and Guadeloupeans today, none would renounce that blue EU passport, specially when they have in front the enormous cost their Haitian former fellow travellers have paid for it, and still continue to pay.
 

aarhus

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At this point that country should be put under a multinational trust, and not just on the military scale like it was with Minustah (which did control security on the ground, but didnt go further than that).

As for their getting independent being the right thing at the time, so what? Martinique and Guadeloupe tried to do so at the same time, yet they failed, but if you got to ask Martinicans and Guadeloupeans today, none would renounce that blue EU passport, specially when they have in front the enormous cost their Haitian former fellow travellers have paid for it, and still continue to pay.
I am not an expert on Haiti history or Haiti now but I would probably agree on the first part of your post. Some multinational governance of the country would save lives and probably save money to in the long term. One still wonders what happened to all those funds after the 2010 earthquake. Disgusting.

I don’t know though if I agree on the second part. The other islands are much smaller. Not sure they compare.
 

Naked_Snake

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I am not an expert on Haiti history or Haiti now but I would probably agree on the first part of your post. Some multinational governance of the country would save lives and probably save money to in the long term. One still wonders what happened to all those funds after the 2010 earthquake. Disgusting.

I don’t know though if I agree on the second part. The other islands are much smaller. Not sure they compare.
I am aware that the same logic applies to my people, but the reasoning is no less true just for that: the act of leaving one's country due to economic or political reasons is a plebiscitarian vote against the continuing independent existence of said country, specially more when it reaches a point when there are more nationals of said country living abroad than there are doing it inside the country in question.
 
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cavok

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I am aware that the same logic applies to my people, but the reasoning is no less true just for that: the act of leaving one's country due to economic or political reasons is a plebiscitarian vote against the continuing independent existence of said country, specially more when it reaches a point when there are more nationals of said country living abroad than there are doing it inside the country in question.
Seriously? Is that a fact? In that case, Haiti is doomed!
 

NanSanPedro

Nickel with tin plating
Apr 12, 2019
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I am aware that the same logic applies to my people, but the reasoning is no less true just for that: the act of leaving one's country due to economic or political reasons is a plebiscitarian vote against the continuing independent existence of said country, specially more when it reaches a point when there are more nationals of said country living abroad than there are doing it inside the country in question.

I would think there's a certain segment of the Haitian aristocracy that would fight that. How successful they would be in the long term is doubtful, but they would put up a fight.
 

aarhus

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I would think there's a certain segment of the Haitian aristocracy that would fight that. How successful they would be in the long term is doubtful, but they would put up a fight.
They failed completely now. Sorry.