Haitians in PC/Bavaro

NanSanPedro

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yeshaiticanprogram.com
https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2024/05/19/dominican-republic-haitian-abuse/

I tend to despise the WAPO, but from where I sit, they nailed it this time.

PUNTA CANA, Dominican Republic — In the shadow of this Caribbean resort, a magnet for American tourists, the raids come almost every day.

Immigration agents, accompanied by uniformed military troops, storm neighborhoods where Haitian workers live, families and advocates say, busting down doors and turning over mattresses in search of cash to swipe. They stop construction workers on their way to job sites to demand money. They take bribes to let deported Haitians back into the country.

“It’s a business,” said a former immigration official who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss the sensitive issue. “You pay on the border, you pay when they stop you on the street, you pay when they search for you in your home.”

A two-year crackdown on undocumented migrants here, broadly supported by Dominicans, has left Haitians vulnerable to the worst abuses, U.S. and U.N. officials say. Interviews with dozens of Haitians, their advocates and former immigration officials show that agents routinely extort suspected Haitians under threat of detention and deportation. Reports of physical and sexual assaults have become frequent, according to the U.S. State Department and the International Organization for Migration.

Haiti and the Dominican Republic share the island of Hispaniola, uneasy neighbors with a long history of conflict. Hundreds of thousands of Haitians work here on farms and in construction, clean homes and do other jobs Dominicans are loath to take up. But Haitian families can live here for generations without gaining Dominican citizenship, and their undocumented status leaves them vulnerable to exploitation.

Now, as Haiti melts down — its presidency vacant, its legislature gone home, its capital controlled by gangs — the government of Dominican President Luis Abinader has empowered immigration agents to ramp up deportations. Authorities removed at least 176,000 Haitians last year in what the State Department called a “mass expulsion … regardless of their claims to legal status.” The United States, by comparison, deported 717 Haitians in the last fiscal year.

As part of the crackdown, the Dominican government imposed new requirements for renewing temporary residency permits — bureaucratic hurdles that have caused another 200,000 Haitians to fall out of legal status. And for eight months starting last year, authorities stopped granting appointments to Haitians trying to renew their visas, affecting thousands more.

For Abinader, the effort has been a political winner. On Sunday, he was reelected president with more than 59 percent of the votes, according to preliminary results.

But even he acknowledges abuses in the immigration system. Recent prosecutions and convictions show the government is addressing the problem, he said last week, but “we have to continue advancing in this matter.”

Given the “very special situation we have in Haiti,” he said, the “operations of the immigration department have increased tenfold. … The borders are very sensitive.”

His administration will continue to fight corruption, he said: “I have to recognize that it is ongoing.”

Abinader has expanded the role of the Interior Ministry and national police in preventing and prosecuting “irregular invasions and occupations” by foreigners. Over the past year, advocates say, police and military troops have taken an increasingly prominent role in the effort.

In a recent report, the State Department cited allegations that Dominican immigration, police and military officials entered homes without warrants, demanded bribes, destroyed identification documents and stole belongings. The department’s Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor noted accusations of arbitrary detentions, unexplained deaths in migration detention, physical abuse of detainees, extortion and sexual violence.

The Dominican government, the bureau reported, “did not take credible steps to identify and punish officials who may have committed human rights abuses.”

Unsanctioned raids have become especially common in Punta Cana. It was in a Haitian neighborhood here, at 5 a.m. one day last month, that a uniformed Air Force member allegedly entered a small, white wooden house, authorities said in charging documents. Inside, a 14-year-old girl was watching over two younger brothers.

The 18-year-old airman had been tasked with helping execute an immigration raid. It was still dark. The children’s parents were out. As immigration agents and troops rounded up Haitians and filed them into a truck, the airman was alone with the girl, she told prosecutors, according to the documents. He wore a balaclava over his face, she said, but took it off.

“He told me to be quiet, and he asked me for a kiss. I said no,” the girl told prosecutors. “That was when he grabbed me by the neck and took me to my room.”

A neighbor heard the screams. She walked in to find the girl in tears, her dress ripped, the woman told prosecutors. The girl and her mother accused the airman of rape; he was arrested.

The airman has denied having any contact with the girl. He said he does not enter homes during raids. The Post could not reach the airman for comment because he is in custody.

The alleged assault has drawn international attention. But Haitians and their advocates here say it wasn’t particularly unusual. It’s emblematic, they say, of systematic abuse by Dominican authorities — abuse that typically goes unreported by families fearful of being deported.

As prosecutors interviewed witnesses of the alleged rape of the girl, one immigration agent spoke of his frustration with military officers “who get out of control.”
Juan Paniagua, disturbed by the case, resigned days later, he told The Post. He was fed up, he said, with masked men kicking down doors and abusing people.
“They’re the Rambos,” Paniagua said. “They wear masks to do harm. … It breaks my heart.”

Thousands of tourists, drawn by the white sand beaches and turquoise waters of this oceanside resort, land at the Punta Cana airport each day. Nearly 120,000 Americans arrived in April alone.

The tourism boom here, hailed as a success story, can be seen in the new hotels and apartment buildings rising over the lush landscape. According to the local construction union, about 90 percent of the workers on these projects are Haitians.

When word spread one morning this month that immigration agents were rounding people up, a large group of young men bolted across the highway, dodging cars to reach the thick brush on the other side.

Junior Surin has a visa to work in the Dominican Republic. But after learning of the day’s operation on an “antenna” — the community’s name for a WhatsApp channel — he decided to stay home. “I’m scared to go out.” He was shot in the arm by authorities last year, he said, while agents rounded up construction workers returning from work in Cap Cana, the coastal resort just south of Punta Cana.

When authorities are cracking down, an engineer at one job site said, only a third of his workforce show up.

Reports of raids, theft and extortion are particularly common in Punta Cana, according to Josué Gastelbondo, who leads the International Organization for Migration in the Dominican Republic. Haitians working in construction or tourism here might make more than those working elsewhere in the country, he said, and, locked out of most banks, are likely to keep cash in their homes.

“It’s like a war trophy,” said Santiago Molina, a local activist. “Everything they find is theirs.”

Governments here have carried out mass deportations in the past. But advocates say this wave is the largest and most sustained. The U.N. high commissioner for human rights urged Abinader in 2022 to halt deportations. Instead, he announced an increase. Deportations that year doubled from the previous year, and have continued to spike.

The government reports deporting 174,602 Haitians in 2023. IOM puts the number at more than 224,000.

Many Dominicans support Abinader’s approach. Some say they fear potential spillover from the lawlessness in Haiti, where armed gangs have kidnapped, raped or killed thousands of people.

“For years, what we’ve been seeing is a silent invasion,” Lourdes Fernández, a 62-year-old teacher from Santiago. She said she fears that Haitians could someday try to claim the Dominican Republic as part of their country.

“There is a national consensus on this issue,” former president Leonel Fernández, who ran unsuccessfully against Abinader on Sunday, told The Post. He
supports a strong approach to securing the border and deporting undocumented Haitians, he said, but the next president must confront the “mafias” — including those within the immigration system — who extort and take advantage of the vulnerable.

Altagracia Luis Jean had just been paid for her job as a housekeeper at a Punta Cana hotel, she said, when immigration agents stormed into her home in the Haitian neighborhood of Mata Mosquito. They broke the lock with a hammer and stole $100 from her purse.

Luis Jean, 41, is Dominican. The agents detained and deported her Haitian husband and her 21-year-old son, who was born here but has struggled to get the paperwork to prove he is a citizen. It was his first time in Haiti. “I couldn’t sleep, I couldn’t eat, worried they would kill him over there,” Luis Jean said.

She hired a “buscón,” or “seeker,” who bribed border agents to bring her husband, her son and his partner back home. It cost more than $800.

A divided family​

Before dawn on April 5, six masked agents walked down the dark, narrow pathway to Jeanne Rimbel’s home. They entered the bedroom where she was sleeping with her 5-year-old son, she said, and took 30,000 pesos — more than $500 — from her bedside drawer. Later that morning, she heard the screams. It was the mother of the girl who reported the rape.
The mother had left early that morning for her job as a cook. The girl’s stepfather, hearing that immigration agents were approaching, was hiding at a friend’s house.
“When you don’t have papers, you run away,” he told The Post.

Nine immigration agents were searching for undocumented migrants that morning, according to the charging documents. Three Air Force members were providing security.
Venancio Alcántara, the country’s immigration director, says military troops should not enter homes or act as immigration agents. They may remove migrants who are occupying private or public spaces illegally, he told The Post, and are permitted to knock down doors to do so. One former immigration official questioned why Air Force members were involved in an immigration raid to begin with. “That’s not their role,” said the former official, who spoke on the condition of anonym ityto discuss the sensitive issue. “They should be at the border.”

A spokeswoman for the Defense Ministry declined to comment.

The 14-year-old girl has struggled to go back to school, her stepfather told The Post. She’s now at a safe house for women and children with her mother and her brothers.
The stepfather’s Haitian passport expired last month, and he doesn’t know how he’ll renew it. He has no Dominican documents allowing him to remain in the country legally.
“Haiti is in a bad place. That’s why I came here,” he said. “I’d like to stay here, with my family.”
 
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El Hijo de Manolo

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Dec 10, 2021
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https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2024/05/19/dominican-republic-haitian-abuse/

I tend to despise the WAPO, but from where I sit, they nailed it this time.
IMG_0197.png
 

CristoRey

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I stopped at
"supported by Dominicans, has left Haitians vulnerable to the worst abuses, U.S. and U.N. officials"
 
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aarhus

www.johnboyter.com
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What about this:
“The stepfather’s Haitian passport expired last month, and he doesn’t know how he’ll renew it. He has no Dominican documents allowing him to remain in the country legally.
“Haiti is in a bad place. That’s why I came here,” he said. “I’d like to stay here, with my family.” “

Despite the circumstances as an illegal Haitian immigrant still wants to stay.
 
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windeguy

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What about this:
“The stepfather’s Haitian passport expired last month, and he doesn’t know how he’ll renew it. He has no Dominican documents allowing him to remain in the country legally.
“Haiti is in a bad place. That’s why I came here,” he said. “I’d like to stay here, with my family.” “

Despite the circumstances as an illegal Haitian immigrant still wants to stay.
About that? That is what the big green buses are for.
 

chico bill

Dogs Better than People
May 6, 2016
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I say treat them with a modicum of dignity because almost all are just very poor workers, who reluctantly accept they are the doormat of the world and likely never will realize a future other than life-long poverty and massive contempt from others worldwide.

Imagine living on this earth and knowing you will never own a car, let alone being able to fill it with gasoline, that your children will always have pulga-bought clothing, you will never sleep under AC on a real mattress on sweltering night, and that your whole months salary can be taken from you on the way home from work, or a whole year of savings to pay for a visa (which is not available now) taken from your home by arrogant soulless Dominican police because they can, without repercussions.....and there is nothing you can do about it.

I came from Oklahoma to California when I was an infant after my bomber-pilot father returned from WWII with just enough in savings to drive a 20-year old car to California to live in one room of my Uncle's home. (Yes we were Okie immigrants)

My Dad worked in a gas station to support a family of 5 and we had used clothes until I was in high school. I didn't have a bed until I was 9, so I slept on quilts made by my grandmother on the living room floor. My first bicycle was one my father pieced together from broken bikes other had thrown away. While we all knew we were poor we also trusted if we worked hard, got free education we could rise above poverty and we all did, including my father.
Hatitians don't have that hope.

Yes they can be deported back to a hell on earth, maybe worse than anywhere else, but many somehow manage to smile and keep working I don't know how.
I don't see large flash mobs of them performing smash and grabs for designer handbags or jewelry, like some more privileged countries.
Yes they are illegal but they are still human. Get to know a few.
Start by securing the border, deport all who commit crimes, and allow in the ones who can contribute to this country.

As one witless leader said "Poor kids are just as bright as White kids" - and those my friends are inspiring words
 

windeguy

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The illegals from Haiti in the DR should be Haiti's problem. Not the DR's.

There is a program for work visas and there are laws as to how many can be on a job site.
Those laws should be enforced. But we all know how good Migracion is at enforcing laws.

I may have posted once or twice about Migracion not enforcing the actual laws.
 
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NALs

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"supported by Dominicans, has left Haitians vulnerable to the worst abuses, U.S. and U.N. officials"
The interesting thing is that very often the media paints it as if Dominicans aremore concerned that there are Haitians in the DR rather thsn their numbers considering you know many, if not most probably aren’t legal (whether outright illegal or with a visa not meant for what they do -only one type of visa and a temporary workers permit legally allows a foreigner to live and work in the DR.)

Yet, it was recently brought to my attention sonethkng that even I had not noticed. They paint Dominicans like that, yet most agricultural jobs go to Haitians. A large segment of construction jobs go to Haitians. The same with maids, increasingly motoconchos, guachimen, etc. The kicker in all of this is that most Haitians (legal and illegal) that work in the DR are in fact hired by small and medium size Dominicans. It may seem at first that most work for the big companies because of the large numbers these companies desl with regarding everything, but most actually are found with the little ones.

If Dominicans were as msny of these media claim, this wouldn’t be the case. They don’t make it a point to clear that there is a difference between hating soneone vs there are simply too much that appeared in a relative short amount of time, especially when the planned long term development never took into account the possibility of this happening. In the end, what ends up influencing how things occurred is what actually happens, not what is planned.

Then you look how much of the percentage of the countries where these medias are based is composed by Haitians and it becomes clear why they turn a blind eye regarding that with the DR. Not too long anout giant Brazil became worried about the “large” number of Haitians going there. As big as Brazil is, the amount of Haitians that they have is considerably less than the amount in the DR. They ahould start to complain when the Haitians amount to the percentage of their national population as is the case in the DR. When at least one place in Brazil has as many Haitians as Bávaro/Punta Cana, then we’ll talk. :censored:
 

NALs

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This reminds me of a particular forum when in Latin America Haitians mostly went to the DR and no other place in the region. Several posters from Peru, Mexico, Brazil, Chile and a few other countries were critical of Dominicans talking about the Haitian immigration issue. Then Haitians began to immigrate more than before to Peru, Brazil, Mexico, etc and these very same posters that were critical about Dominicans discussing the issue began to be critical about the same issue regarding Haitian immigration to their countries. To this day the amount of Haitians in all those countries doesn’t compare with the percentage of the DR population already composed by Haitian migrants and their offsprings. Plus, none of them are going through anything similar like over 30% of the country’s births are done by Haitian women, many recent arrivals that don’t even speak Spanish.

Now the criticism has turn to silence. If only the situation gets to the level it’s in the DR to see what they will say then.

As the saying goes, it’s one thing to call the devil. It’s something else to see him come!

Even Puerto Rico isn’t going through something similar. For one, Haitians are a rarity in PR. Then, Dominicans are the most visible foreigners and their presence pales in comparison with the presence of Haitians in the DR. It really isn’t an apples to apples comparison. I wouldn’t expect Puerto Ricans to fully understand as the other Latin Americans that were singing one tune when there were hardly any Haitians going to their countries, but completely changed the tune when Haitian immigration started to increased to those very sane countries. And again, nowhere in Latin America is near to how it’s in the DR.
 

aarhus

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The interesting thing is that very often the media paints it as if Dominicans aremore concerned that there are Haitians in the DR rather thsn their numbers considering you know many, if not most probably aren’t legal (whether outright illegal or with a visa not meant for what they do -only one type of visa and a temporary workers permit legally allows a foreigner to live and work in the DR.)

Yet, it was recently brought to my attention sonethkng that even I had not noticed. They paint Dominicans like that, yet most agricultural jobs go to Haitians. A large segment of construction jobs go to Haitians. The same with maids, increasingly motoconchos, guachimen, etc. The kicker in all of this is that most Haitians (legal and illegal) that work in the DR are in fact hired by small and medium size Dominicans. It may seem at first that most work for the big companies because of the large numbers these companies desl with regarding everything, but most actually are found with the little ones.

If Dominicans were as msny of these media claim, this wouldn’t be the case. They don’t make it a point to clear that there is a difference between hating soneone vs there are simply too much that appeared in a relative short amount of time, especially when the planned long term development never took into account the possibility of this happening. In the end, what ends up influencing how things occurred is what actually happens, not what is planned.

Then you look how much of the percentage of the countries where these medias are based is composed by Haitians and it becomes clear why they turn a blind eye regarding that with the DR. Not too long anout giant Brazil became worried about the “large” number of Haitians going there. As big as Brazil is, the amount of Haitians that they have is considerably less than the amount in the DR. They ahould start to complain when the Haitians amount to the percentage of their national population as is the case in the DR. When at least one place in Brazil has as many Haitians as Bávaro/Punta Cana, then we’ll talk. :censored:
Those small and medium sized businesses may be part of the informal economy anyway. Not reporting nomina/payroll to the TSS.
 

chico bill

Dogs Better than People
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The illegals from Haiti in the DR should be Haiti's problem. Not the DR's.

There is a program for work visas and there are laws as to how many can be on a job site.
Those laws should be enforced. But we all know how good Migracion is at enforcing laws.

I may have posted once or twice about Migracion not enforcing the actual laws.
Winde. You're white, you're an immigrant. You don't pay for Haitians here, like US taxpayers in America.
I don't recall saying one ever robbed you?

Why are you so adamant they "all become Haiti's problem"
 
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bob saunders

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Winde. You're white, you're an immigrant. You don't pay for Haitians here, like US taxpayers in America.
I don't recall saying one ever robbed you?

Why are you so adamant they "all become Haiti's problem"
Winde pays taxes so yes, he pays for Haitians receiving " free services" as do I. His color is irrelevant, and he is a citizen. Work Visa programs can be made flexible by the government, but they should be enforced. I feel for the poor Haitians and what is happening in their country, but illegals are illegals and should be treated as such.
 
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chico bill

Dogs Better than People
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Winde pays taxes so yes, he pays for Haitians receiving " free services" as do I. His color is irrelevant, and he is a citizen. Work Visa programs can be made flexible by the government, but they should be enforced. I feel for the poor Haitians and what is happening in their country, but illegals are illegals and should be treated as such.
Well I know he recently got his citizenship but that is a non factor. I'm legal too. We all pay taxes on purchases but I do not think he pays income tax here to which I was referring. You, because you have a school, probably have to pay income taxes.
In this case I think skin color is indeed a factor. It's exactly how they get singled out and rounded up. Color is a factor worldwide in every country I've lived or worked.
I am not promoting illegal crossings, yeah that's not right but none of us can understand their desperation.
But people who are obeying the law including once they are already here and after many many years here don't deserve to be robbed by police or treated like dirt.
 

aarhus

www.johnboyter.com
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I don’t think there is a difference with taxes being a citizen or permanent resident. There is no worldwide income tax.
 

NALs

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Winde. You're white, you're an immigrant. You don't pay for Haitians here, like US taxpayers in America.
I don't recall saying one ever robbed you?

Why are you so adamant they "all become Haiti's problem"
Except for Haitians and maybe Venezuelans, every other nationality of immigrants in the DR (including expats) are well below 1% each. Oh yes, in this forum expats are very visible given this website is en English and focused mainly on expats. In reality, even in Puerto Plata you can spend days without running into an expat. That’s considering Puerto Plata probably has a larger share of its population as expats than typical major Dominican size and many expats from Sosúa/Cabarete go to Puerto Plata town for several reasons (shop at Jumbo, etc.) In most of the DR you simply don’t see expats, don’t even know the DR has a few. When you see that the towns where expats are most visible are in some villages like Cabarete or small towns like Sosúa or Las Terrenas, that is saying saying something.

One interesting detail to know is from where is the average English speaking foreigners in the DR? The US* (despite the recent grow of African American, the vast majority are white)? Canada? Or from the English islands in the Caribbean (which means almost all are black)?

* Dominican-Americans should be separate from the rest of Americans since it goes without saying most with US passports living in the DR probably are Dominican-Americans and Dominicans that simply were born in the USA.
 

windeguy

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Winde. You're white, you're an immigrant. You don't pay for Haitians here, like US taxpayers in America.
I don't recall saying one ever robbed you?

Why are you so adamant they "all become Haiti's problem"
I am white, you got that right.

I only have one residence which is in the DR and I am a naturalized DR citizen.
If I don't pay for illegals here, than neither do other Dominicans.

Why ? Because I am completely against illegal aliens in either country where I am a citizen.
My wife concurs and she was born here and is Dominican.
 
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chico bill

Dogs Better than People
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I am white, you got that right.

I only have one residence which is in the DR and I am a naturalized DR citizen.
If I don't pay for illegals here, than neither do other Dominicans.

Why ? Because I am completely against illegal aliens in either country where I am a citizen.
My wife concurs and she was born here and is Dominican.

We do agree on that - we are against illegal immigration.
Blacks, as slaves, first appeared on the island in the late 1400s.

But the difference is I don't see them as nuisance 'aka aliens' to be rounded up. - I see humanity in them and I am not against them as persons, although they should not have come illegally.
I have a few Haitian friends, and one employee who my dogs like and dogs know people.

Also many Dominican families were brought here by Dominicans to work in the sugar cane fields. They've worked here for decades in a dying industry. Now what to do with them and who is responsible they are here ?

And the whole of Hispanola was once ruled by Haiti and it was Haiti rule that outlawed slave ownership in all of Hispanola.

But the question is what does the DR do now with those here?

Some we're born and raised here yet have no rights, & near impossible path to citizenship, many can't acquire birth CERTIFICATES, since Law 285 in 2004. In 2007 Resolution 012 required a check of birth parents legality. In 2013 courts stripped citizenship for anyone born to immigrant parents between 1929 and 2010 who weren't in the civil registry.
I am not familiar with more recent rulings but can you blame some confusion among Haitians.

Even if they've lived here their entire lives and don't speak Creole or French they could conceivably be sent off to a country they've never seen because their parents were immigrants.

Una problema grande for sure.
 

windeguy

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What is to be done? Simple. Deport all those who are not legally here. The DR made its laws as they are for a reason.
They should be enforced better than they are.
 
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SKY

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What is to be done? Simple. Deport all those who are not legally here. The DR made its laws as they are for a reason.
They should be enforced better than they are.
I assume you would throw anyone on DR1 that is an "overstay" as you call it into that pot........Right?....................
 
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