Have me Residencia Inversion but still confused

RG84

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May 21, 2010
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After a 6 months I finally have my residency card. The process could have been 2 months if I didn't have to wait for documents I thought I didn't need because they were not on the list of documents needed.


What I'm confused about is when I turned all my documents in, the young lady who was helping me ( she was nice and even followed up on a question I had that she couldn't answer that day) had me to make changes to myletter of guarantee because it stated I was applying for a temporary visa. She informed me that my visa, Rentista Visa is a permanent one.

Well when receiving my card I looked at the date of expiration and it is only for one year. I asked the same lady, "You told me this is permanent and is good for 10 yrs." She replied, "Yes, but the first year you have to renew and then renew every 2 years for the next 5 yrs. It will then become definitivo.

Has any one else gone thorough this process and could help me understand? I wanted to ask more questions, but I was getting light headed, I didn't eat anything in the morning and now it was 3:00.
 

RG84

Bronze
May 21, 2010
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Can a Mod change the title to "I have my Residencia Inversion but still confused." Not have me. duhh
 

oldschool

Active member
Oct 9, 2004
521
17
38
After a 6 months I finally have my residency card. The process could have been 2 months if I didn't have to wait for documents I thought I didn't need because they were not on the list of documents needed.


What I'm confused about is when I turned all my documents in, the young lady who was helping me ( she was nice and even followed up on a question I had that she couldn't answer that day) had me to make changes to myletter of guarantee because it stated I was applying for a temporary visa. She informed me that my visa, Rentista Visa is a permanent one.

Well when receiving my card I looked at the date of expiration and it is only for one year. I asked the same lady, "You told me this is permanent and is good for 10 yrs." She replied, "Yes, but the first year you have to renew and then renew every 2 years for the next 5 yrs. It will then become definitivo.

Has any one else gone thorough this process and could help me understand? I wanted to ask more questions, but I was getting light headed, I didn't eat anything in the morning and now it was 3:00.
From what I remember. When they changed the laws a few years back Provisional residencies ( Yellow Card ) need to be renewed yearly for 4 years then a permanent residency ( Blue Card ) is given which is good for longer ( I think the longer you have had the blue card the longer it can be valid for ) the last time I renewed mine it was good for 4 years...maybe longer I need to check )
 

william webster

Platinum
Jan 16, 2009
24,292
980
113
you have the better card....less renewals and (I think) easier renewals

leave it at that.

check with Buster Blowhard -- aka Cdn Gringo
He'll set you straight
 

Mauricio

Gold
Nov 18, 2002
5,607
7
38
A permanent residence card also needs to be renewed. If I remember well first every year and later with bigger intervals, difference with a temporary residence card is that the renewal is easier.
 

franco1111

Bronze
May 29, 2013
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93
48
Gringo
I have Residencia por Inversion. First card was good for one year. I renewed it. Second card was good for two years. I renewed it. So, now the third card is good for another two years. So now,I have had residencia for nearly five years. I think I have to continue to renew every two years. Until I have it for 10 years. Then I have been told they will issue one good for another 10 years (with no more renewals required).

RG84 says he expects to have permanent after five years. I have not heard this, but maybe it is true?
 

RG84

Bronze
May 21, 2010
640
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I have Residencia por Inversion. First card was good for one year. I renewed it. Second card was good for two years. I renewed it. So, now the third card is good for another two years. So now,I have had residencia for nearly five years. I think I have to continue to renew every two years. Until I have it for 10 years. Then I have been told they will issue one good for another 10 years (with no more renewals required).

RG84 says he expects to have permanent after five years. I have not heard this, but maybe it is true?
I was told that mine is Permanent now. What I'm thinking is permanent is just a title, a type. I still have to renew every two years. It seems I have the same one as you. How much was your renewal fee and did you have to take a physical?
 

RG84

Bronze
May 21, 2010
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I also wonder would the process have been easier with a lawyer. I did it all myself and it wasn't that bad. The waiting was the some of the hardest parts. Don't know if a lawyer would have made a difference because the people whom I saw with lawyers were waiting right along with me. LOL
 

franco1111

Bronze
May 29, 2013
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Gringo
I was told that mine is Permanent now. What I'm thinking is permanent is just a title, a type. I still have to renew every two years. It seems I have the same one as you. How much was your renewal fee and did you have to take a physical?
Yes, I was told mine was 'pemanent' too. It does seem to be just a title, as you say.

I only had the 'physical' (chest x-ray, blood test) the first time, for the first card. And not again for the renewals. I don't know what the fees are - I have the lawyer do it. Easier for me.
 
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franco1111

Bronze
May 29, 2013
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48
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I also wonder would the process have been easier with a lawyer. I did it all myself and it wasn't that bad. The waiting was the some of the hardest parts. Don't know if a lawyer would have made a difference because the people whom I saw with lawyers were waiting right along with me. LOL
The process with the lawyer is easy. Walk in, go to private office with what seems to be all the files for Residencia por Inversion, hand over some papers. Go get photo taken. Walk out with card. No wait. Unless there is a problem. We had a problem one time with a signature (it was not done) and we had to wait for that. But, luckily it was done within hours.

It is much less expensive to do it yourself if you have the time and speak Spanish well enough. You can ask a lawyer how much they will charge if you have them do it : )