History from two perpectives

Chip

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Jul 25, 2007
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Santiago
As I was reading a Dominican newspaper this morning I was reviewing an article about the battle of Santiago in 1844. This battle with the battle of Azua of the same year were the two first collaborated efforts by the Dominicans to repel the Haitians from their country. These battles were the direct result of the declaration of independence on February 27 of the same year.

Nonetheless, as I was reading the article in La Informacion it referenced a Gen. Pierrot who led the Haitian response to the Dominican declaration of independence. Curious, I looked up Gen. Pierrot's biography on Wikipedia and surprisingly this is what is said:

Pierrot's most pressing duty as the new president was to check the incursions of the Dominicans, who were harassing the Haitian troops along the borders. Dominican boats were also making depredations on Haiti's coasts. President Pierrot decided to open a campaign against the Dominicans, whom he considered merely as insurgents. Haitians, however, were not inclined to go to war with their neighbors, and were unwilling to support the President's views.

It is clear from the above passage that the Haitians are presented as patriotic defenders of Haiti from Dominican invaders who were reluctant to fight as opposed to oppressors who occupied Dominican soil. The excerpt apparently is from "Haiti: Her History and Her Detractors" by Jacques Nicolas L?ger in 1907.

I think it should be apparent that much of the negative criticism the Dominican Republic receives with respect to it's relations are no doubt rooted in a distorted version of history such as this alternate version presented on Wikipedia.

I believe then that only real solutions can be obtained through an accurate understanding of history and concerns from both parties as opposed to a one sided and wholly inaccurate point of view.
 

jabejuventus

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Feb 15, 2013
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One of the first things emphasized in my doctoral studies (I've been stuck on Chap 3 dissertation stage for over a year) was that such as Wikipedia are not reliable sources of accurate information.
 

Chip

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Jul 25, 2007
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Santiago
One of the first things emphasized in my doctoral studies (I've been stuck on Chap 3 dissertation stage for over a year) was that such as Wikipedia are not reliable sources of accurate information.

You are right, Wikiperdia is a part of the problem of disseminating propaganda. Nonetheless, in this particular case the reference is correct:

The next day the Council of State elected General
Pierrot President of the Republic. The new Chief of
the Executive Power was not much younger than his
predecessor, being 84 years old. His most pressing
duty was to check the incursions of the Dominicans,
who were harassing the Haitian troops along the bor-
ders. There they had elected General Santana Presi-
dent, and seized every opportunity to attack and annoy
our soldiers. Their crafts also were making depreda-
tions on our coasts.

President Pierrot decided to open a campaign against
the Dominicans, whom he considered merely as insur-
gents. The Haitians, however, not being anxious to
engage upon war with their neighbors, were unwilling
to support the President's views.


Full text of "Haiti, her history and her detractors"

Also, not too surprisingly is that the Spanish version of the same page has quite a different entry, which in fact appears to be the correct history.
 

Squat

Tropical geek in Las Terrenas
Jan 1, 2002
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Isn't it human for each party to rewrite history according to their own worldviews?
 

Chirimoya

Well-known member
Dec 9, 2002
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Isn't it human for each party to rewrite history according to their own worldviews?
My mother, who was educated in a French school, claims that their history books only mentioned the Battle of Waterloo en passant, as it were.
 

jabejuventus

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Feb 15, 2013
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You are right, Wikiperdia is a part of the problem of disseminating propaganda. Nonetheless, in this particular case the reference is correct:

The next day the Council of State elected General
Pierrot President of the Republic. The new Chief of
the Executive Power was not much younger than his
predecessor, being 84 years old. His most pressing
duty was to check the incursions of the Dominicans,
who were harassing the Haitian troops along the bor-
ders. There they had elected General Santana Presi-
dent, and seized every opportunity to attack and annoy
our soldiers. Their crafts also were making depreda-
tions on our coasts.

President Pierrot decided to open a campaign against
the Dominicans, whom he considered merely as insur-
gents. The Haitians, however, not being anxious to
engage upon war with their neighbors, were unwilling
to support the President's views.


Full text of "Haiti, her history and her detractors"

Also, not too surprisingly is that the Spanish version of the same page has quite a different entry, which in fact appears to be the correct history.

But, the doctor said, "It's a good place to start your research."
 

Chip

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Jul 25, 2007
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Santiago
Well at least in this case we know the Haitians occupied the Dominican side in 1844 as opposed to Santo Domingo being a sovereign country that was attacking Haiti.
 

drescape24

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Nov 2, 2011
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One of the first things emphasized in my doctoral studies (I've been stuck on Chap 3 dissertation stage for over a year) was that such as Wikipedia are not reliable sources of accurate information.

Please don't say wikipedia isn't accurate or reliable. Do you know how many dr1ers need a wiki or google link to make a post! What are they going to tout out to prove their point now? Oh wait, being accurate doesn't matter as long as the poster writes a book of a post. Haha. You know who you dr1ers are ...hahah

drescape24
 

Squat

Tropical geek in Las Terrenas
Jan 1, 2002
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Well at least in this case we know the Haitians occupied the Dominican side in 1844 as opposed to Santo Domingo being a sovereign country that was attacking Haiti.
In Haitian history, the fact that I always find the most intriguing is Jean-Pierre Boyer's acceptance of the payements to France. I've always believed he accepted some kind of "under the table" benefits for that. If I am not mistaken, he left Haiti afterwards and peacefully retired... in France!