Home Schooling ~ anyone have experience

arete92

Active member
Jul 5, 2018
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Hello,

We have been considering home school options for our son. I am Canadian wife is Dominican we both agree the schools here private or not are up to par with the educational expectations and more or less act as a filter so your son/daughter is not with people of lower social class.

I'm curious what Dominican law says about this... Can our son be home-schooled and still receive the necessary papers upon course completion/ exams ? does anyone additionally know if Canada would recognize homeschooling in a different country with the respected province ( Ontario ) educational standards and course work?

Thanks

P.S not completely closed to the idea of attending a private school, but from what I observe they are indeed filters and doesn't necessarily mean they'll be getting better education per say.
 
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ctrob

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Nov 9, 2006
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You should ask in the Legal Forum for the "legal in Dom" question.

But if you want to comply with North American regulations, just buy that particular North American curriculum on line. I doubt they care what the physical location is, as long as you cover the required topics - but ask them if they'll issue the diplomas under your circumstances.

You can have it shipped to a dominican EPS or someplace similar. Teach the kid, comply with all the curriculum rules, and he'll get North American diplomas for each completed grade.
 

arete92

Active member
Jul 5, 2018
293
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You should ask in the Legal Forum for the "legal in Dom" question.

But if you want to comply with North American regulations, just buy that particular North American curriculum on line. I doubt they care what the physical location is, as long as you cover the required topics - but ask them if they'll issue the diplomas under your circumstances.

You can have it shipped to a dominican EPS or someplace similar. Teach the kid, comply with all the curriculum rules, and he'll get North American diplomas for each completed grade.

ah nice didn't know you could just buy it online
 

irsav

Well-known member
Jan 26, 2019
692
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Hello,

We have been considering home school options for our son. I am Canadian wife is Dominican we both agree the schools here private or not are up to par with the educational expectations and more or less act as a filter so your son/daughter is not with people of lower social class.

I'm curious what Dominican law says about this... Can our son be home-schooled and still receive the necessary papers upon course completion/ exams ? does anyone additionally know if Canada would recognize homeschooling in a different country with the respected province ( Ontario ) educational standards and course work?

Thanks

P.S not completely closed to the idea of attending a private school, but from what I observe they are indeed filters and doesn't necessarily mean they'll be getting better education per say.

To live in this country with children of the school age - IS A VERY BAD LUCK. Highly irresponsible to your kids.
Homeschooling won`t help. We were thinking about it a lot too. For this reason only we decided against living full time here. Although we have access to some diplomatic agencies schools in SD. This option was one of the reasons for our relocation from Sosua to SD area.
 

bob saunders

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To live in this country with children of the school age - IS A VERY BAD LUCK. Highly irresponsible to your kids.
Homeschooling won`t help. We were thinking about it a lot too. For this reason only we decided against living full time here. Although we have access to some diplomatic agencies schools in SD. This option was one of the reasons for our relocation from Sosua to SD area.

Really not true at all. We have a number of former students that have complete their high school here in the DR, some at private schools and some even in the public schools that have successfully gone on to careers/university/college in Canada, USA, and Europe. One of our former students just started his internship and Kansas State University, Another is at University of Arkansas, another at Florida State, many that have degrees from Hofstra in NY.....etc. It depends on the individual. As for the OP perhaps you can find out your homeschooling information here https://www.time4learning.com/homeschool/homeschooling_in_canada.shtml
https://homeschoolcanada.ca/homeschooling-by-province/
Homeschooling is accepted in every province but the rules are a little different in each province as well. Very popular in BC , even though BC has a very good public school system, as well as a well developed charter school system. My SIL teaches in a Christian Academy in Chilliwack, BC.
My Dominican Stepson went from Grade five in our private school into Grade five Public School Courtenay British Columbia and had no issues other that an extra ESL course for three months. He now has a degree in Computer Science and is working towards a second degree, his Chartered Accounting degree in Calgary.
 
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irsav

Well-known member
Jan 26, 2019
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Really not true at all. We have a number of former students that have complete their high school here in the DR, some at private schools and some even in the public schools that have successfully gone on to careers/university/college in Canada, USA, and Europe. One of our former students just started his internship and Kansas State University, Another is at University of Arkansas, another at Florida State, many that have degrees from Hofstra in NY.....etc. It depends on the individual. As for the OP perhaps you can find out your homeschooling information here https://www.time4learning.com/homeschool/homeschooling_in_canada.shtml
https://homeschoolcanada.ca/homeschooling-by-province/
Homeschooling is accepted in every province but the rules are a little different in each province as well. Very popular in BC , even though BC has a very good public school system, as well as a well developed charter school system. My SIL teaches in a Christian Academy in Chilliwack, BC.
My Dominican Stepson went from Grade five in our private school into Grade five Public School Courtenay British Columbia and had no issues other that an extra ESL course for three months. He now has a degree in Computer Science and is working towards a second degree, his Chartered Accounting degree in Calgary.

We thoroughly investigated Sosua International School in La Mulata. Spoke with the Administration. Double checked their claims that they are " officially affiliated in the USA". Requested lists of the students who graduated. To see their academic success. And we were shocked with what we found out.
Diplomatic schools in SD are better. But driving every day to the capital back and forth - is not a legit idea. So we gave up on these plans.
99% of immigrants from the Third World countries move to America for a better education and future of their children.
Wishing all the best to the OP anyway!
 

bob saunders

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We thoroughly investigated Sosua International School in La Mulata. Spoke with the Administration. Double checked their claims that they are " officially affiliated in the USA". Requested lists of the students who graduated. To see their academic success. And we were shocked with what we found out.
Diplomatic schools in SD are better. But driving every day to the capital back and forth - is not a legit idea. So we gave up on these plans.
99% of immigrants from the Third World countries move to America for a better education and future of their children.
Wishing all the best to the OP anyway!

So you checked one school and that was it? 99% of immigrants go to the USA for dollars.
 

bob saunders

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Yes. Because SIS is considered THE BEST PRIVATE SCHOOL IN DR.
Says who:
St George is also better, as is Santiago Christian school,.....etc. If the OP doesn't mind the religious part of the schooling, there are a number of bilingual Christian schools that are pretty good in both Santo Domingo (New Horizons) and in Santiago. I have a friend whose daughter teaches in the Dominican-American school in the capital and it is pretty good as well.
 

arete92

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Jul 5, 2018
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Great info in here everyone. Bob, I do not mind the religious teachings; although not religious myself I don't see any harm - with that said, I just care that the student(s) or my son in this case are taught critical thinking skills as well as a heavy dose of science or sub-domain. Being an engineer myself these are the things I tend to value. The reason for the whole homeschooling idea was because from what I have observed from the schools here they are severly lacking in stimulating students to follow logical thought patterns.. to be fair - even in Ontario this can be lacking at some schools, but I find there is a lot of fluff here and the environments in context of learning here are not as conductive; both due to internal instional issues along with cultural and external (I can't really control this I know) but the fact that you walk in the street for 20 mins and you see enough illogical decisions and habits it tends to be contagious for some. Not complaining - I know how it is here but, just presenting my observations.
 
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Great info in here everyone. Bob, I do not mind the religious teachings; although not religious myself I don't see any harm - with that said, I just care that the student(s) or my son in this case are taught critical thinking skills as well as a heavy dose of science or sub-domain. Being an engineer myself these are the things I tend to value. The reason for the whole homeschooling idea was because from what I have observed from the schools here they are severly lacking in stimulating students to follow logical thought patterns.. to be fair - even in Ontario this can be lacking at some schools, but I find there is a lot of fluff here and the environments in context of learning here are not as conductive; both due to internal instional issues along with cultural and external (I can't really control this I know) but the fact that you walk in the street for 20 mins and you see enough illogical decisions and habits it tends to be contagious for some. Not complaining - I know how it is here but, just presenting my observations.

If you are willing to sacrifice living here and return to your home country for your child's education, why don't you also search the best schools here and investigate moving to another area of the country.

My experience is that many private schools are fine for young children. They do a good job teaching the basics of reading, writing and math. However, after 5th grade, when the teachers need a broader education in science, math concepts, world history, etc. the schools begin to fall short. There simply is not an adequate number of teachers - especially at high school level- to teach chemistry, physics, calculus, etc. I can give you a local example, although this is a public school. Jamao has a vocational school. It is equipped with all that is needed for a chemistry lab, a physics lab, a mechanics program, and I don't remember what else. All equipment is stored in wood boxes brand new. Has been there for years. There are no qualified teachers available. The school was begging me to find teachers from abroad for them to start these courses.

I would be curious to know more about the Santiago School of Robotics and Technology. I read in the news a couple of times that their students won international awards in competitions. Anyone know about this school?

Anyway, your decision is not easy. I congratulate you on taking your child's education seriously. Since it is important to you, take some time and investigate the better private schools in the country. Might be an enjoyable visit to different parts of the country while also teaching your child the importance you place on his/her education.

Good luck.
Lindsey
 

Cdn_Gringo

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Apr 29, 2014
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As Lindsay says, the very basics can be taught here in the right schools for the most part. Ultimately, it is the parents responsibility to ensure that their children's education is progressing as it should. This will probably mean some remedial work at home to solidify basic math, reading, vocabulary, geography and history.

Languages is another area of concern. While here in Latin America, Spanish is important. I seem to recall you mentioning Ontario above, so French might be more of a benefit later in life. The time to teach languages is when the kids are young as that is when the kids learn them with the least difficulty.

It's a tough call. The longer you are out of the system that your children will eventually end up in, the more of a challenge reentry and reintegration will be. I am of the opinion that this is not the country in which to pursue education if the family has other better options available to them. The DR remains a viable retirement or part time home for foreigners, but quickly begins to fall short if one needs to earn a living and raise children here.
 

bob saunders

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As Lindsay says, the very basics can be taught here in the right schools for the most part. Ultimately, it is the parents responsibility to ensure that their children's education is progressing as it should. This will probably mean some remedial work at home to solidify basic math, reading, vocabulary, geography and history.

Languages is another area of concern. While here in Latin America, Spanish is important. I seem to recall you mentioning Ontario above, so French might be more of a benefit later in life. The time to teach languages is when the kids are young as that is when the kids learn them with the least difficulty.

It's a tough call. The longer you are out of the system that your children will eventually end up in, the more of a challenge reentry and reintegration will be. I am of the opinion that this is not the country in which to pursue education if the family has other better options available to them. The DR remains a viable retirement or part time home for foreigners, but quickly begins to fall short if one needs to earn a living and raise children here.

https://stgeorge.do/upperschool/ Sounds like they teach critical thinking
 

Chirimoya

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Dec 9, 2002
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As the parent of a child who went to four good private schools in the capital and one in Punta Cana, I can say that on the whole the quality of education he received was good. There was always an element of luck of the draw when it came to teachers, because the quality varied. Having said that most of his teachers, both Dominican and foreign, were very good.

In any system or circumstances parental input is key for acquiring general knowledge through reading, watching quality programmes, exposure to arts and culture; developing personal responsibility, healthy habits, considerate behaviour and environmental awareness; learning about practical things and useful skills, especially critical thinking.
 

windeguy

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We thoroughly investigated Sosua International School in La Mulata. Spoke with the Administration. Double checked their claims that they are " officially affiliated in the USA". Requested lists of the students who graduated. To see their academic success. And we were shocked with what we found out.
Diplomatic schools in SD are better. But driving every day to the capital back and forth - is not a legit idea. So we gave up on these plans.
99% of immigrants from the Third World countries move to America for a better education and future of their children.
Wishing all the best to the OP anyway!

Uhm, what did you find out?