I Think I Need a New Barber.....

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belgiank

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Jun 13, 2009
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Fish, I may be wrong.

I think Anna is on the right side of the road, if you come from Sosua, across from the century 21 office.

The other one is in Ocean Dream Plaza, and Gorditos is the taco place there. Same plaza where the EPS office is

BelgianK
 

jrhartley

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Sep 10, 2008
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I like my man near casa angela next to the chicken place (Sosua), I enquired on the price while passing and he said 100 pesos straight off, usually they all try to up the price and then you have to go through the bargaining rigmarole (how ever you spell it)
 

Dark_Scorpion

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Aug 13, 2012
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Yes,according to the law of economics as business is slow,you lower the prices.BUT we are talking
about the dominican mentality,which is the opposite.:tired: :D

There is a thick line separating Dominicans abroad from the Locals.

Dominicans living abroad have greater experience and exposure to the outside world, giving them a balanced worldview. My family in the U.S. acts the same way that locals here act, and that is because most of them have never left the U.S. For instance, I don't even think my mother or brother knows where the DR is, I'm not kidding. My mom knows its in the Caribbean, but I'm almost willing to bet if I showed her a blank map of the Caribbean islands she wouldn't be able to pinpoint the location of the DR, despite it being the second largest island in the region...

Bronzeallspice, this phenomenon isn't just seen in local Dominicans. I'm sure the poor farmer living in Azerbaijan has the same mentality. My mother acts like many local Dominicans, she doesn't know much about the world outside her home. I've asked her about visiting the DR but I know my mom and I know she never will. A lot of it has to do with fear and people just don't want to leave their comfort zone. Dominicans who become expatriates or Americans who expatriate to the DR are unique and exceptional people. Truth is, anyone who is willing to leave the country of their birth, their comfort zone, to go to a new place where they must learn a new culture and language are exceptional. I've read that at least 70 percent of Americans never set foot outside the U.S. I'm thankful I'm not among them. Anyways, I'm reading this book on Dominican culture and I can't put it down, will probably be done with the entire book this week, I'm learning so much, glad I picked it up.
 

Dark_Scorpion

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Aug 13, 2012
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funny ! I dont like it when people try to overemphasise their firm handshake

The handshake thing is real. One time I loaned money to "friend" who had a weak handshake.....and I ended up suing him and having to take him to court over the loan. I'm not saying that everyone with a firm handshake is honest and all that, but I do believe that is ONE of the things you should analyze when meeting a person. Most of the people I've met with firm handshakes have been honest, most of them. But people with weak handshakes have always given me problems sooner or later.
 

CFA123

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May 29, 2004
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Scorp... u like the haircut, u don't have to wait in line, that's major pluses in my book.
Now, just tell him what you're willing to pay. If he accepts, fine. You've still taught him "the lesson" that you know you've been taken and you get what you want without waiting in line. Let the other schmucks go down the street and wait in line.
 

Dark_Scorpion

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Aug 13, 2012
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Wow, Scorpion, you need to relax a bit. You do not want to say the name of the barber, because people could figure out where you live? What is the big deal with that? You on the wanted list of Interpol, or what?

Anyways, my barber in Sosua charges me 75rds for trimming beard, moustache, eyebrows, nosehair, etc... Have to ask him to include the pubes next time, although sitting in an open air barbershop with my pants down. I don't want all the girls come running around the corner. I pay 125rds for hair, and the whole works.

He does call me "amigo", but that is ok, as that is the habit here, and he doesn't mean it. We have never shaken hands, but have touched fists. But next time, Scorpion, I will insist, as I also like a firm handshake. On the other hand, I would be more worried if his hands were shaking...

And now you got me worried, he also sits outside a lot, with the place empty. Mind you, not all the time. And I discovered it is a very bad idea to go to the barber on Friday afternoon, or Saturday as then all locals go.

So, my hiding friend, relax, find another barber, and start enjoying life.

BelgianK

I know I sometimes sound paranoid on these threads, but I'm just cautious. I've seen, experienced, and read enough in my life to naturally distrust people and their intentions. Living in a foreign country has only amplified my nature. I'm like a turtle
in a shell and it will be awhile before I fully stick my head out. I've read some of the horror stories of expats and tourists living here and I don't want it to happen to me.

Besides, I'm reading Dominican history, and look what happened to the Tainos when they trust the Spaniards? Yeah.....didn't turn out so good for them, did it? See, a lot of expats have to come down here and go through the school of hard knocks, but I graduated from that school while still living in the U.S. I've been stabbed in the back by people who I thought were my friends, who told me so, I've been betrayed by my own blood relatives. Now you can see why I became unhappy when that barber called me his friend, if you know what I know, you know that "friends" can be some of your most dangerous enemies. I will put it like this, my margin for error here in the DR is small. I can't afford to make serious mistakes.
 

Dark_Scorpion

Bronze
Aug 13, 2012
962
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LAWS.....there are no laws down here

OMFG....there are always laws dude! I can't believe you said that. Yes, the DR has laws, just like Russia or China or any other place. Good lord man, if you or anyone else here thinks the DR doesn't have laws you're in deep deep trouble, it is only a matter of when you get in it. You know why I'm reading this book on Dominican culture and customs? So I can understand the laws, the rules. For instance, I just learned this morning that if you are nonreligious like me, you'd better not tell a Dominican that you don't believe in God. I'm Agnostic, and now I know to keep my mouth shut about it. I could give two shts about religion or God BUT the locals here are very religious and will take great offense if you tell them you are not a believer, so don't, even if you aren't!
 

belgiank

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Jun 13, 2009
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Scorpion, I know the meaning of the word "friend", and have been back-stabbed by so-called friends as well. Even here on the island.

You are reading a book about Dominican culture, so if it does not mention that "amigo" is used a lot, without any meaning, I would throw the book away.

When I still lived in Jarabacoa I used to go to the small colmados for last-minute things, or cigarettes and such. If I went more than 3 times to one, they would start to greet me with "AMIGO!". No meaning behind it, no ulterior motive, they started to get to know you, so they greeted you. Same with the motoconchos there.

If they actually say "you are my fren", start running... lol

BelgianK
 

bronzeallspice

Platinum
Mar 26, 2012
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Dominicans living abroad have greater experience and exposure to the outside world, giving them a balanced worldview. My family in the U.S. acts the same way that locals here act, and that is because most of them have never left the U.S. For instance, I don't even think my mother or brother knows where the DR is, I'm not kidding. My mom knows its in the Caribbean, but I'm almost willing to bet if I showed her a blank map of the Caribbean islands she wouldn't be able to pinpoint the location of the DR, despite it being the second largest island in the region...

Bronzeallspice, this phenomenon isn't just seen in local Dominicans. I'm sure the poor farmer living in Azerbaijan has the same mentality. My mother acts like many local Dominicans, she doesn't know much about the world outside her home. I've asked her about visiting the DR but I know my mom and I know she never will. A lot of it has to do with fear and people just don't want to leave their comfort zone. Dominicans who become expatriates or Americans who expatriate to the DR are unique and exceptional people. Truth is, anyone who is willing to leave the country of their birth, their comfort zone, to go to a new place where they must learn a new culture and language are exceptional. I've read that at least 70 percent of Americans never set foot outside the U.S. I'm thankful I'm not among them. Anyways, I'm reading this book on Dominican culture and I can't put it down, will probably be done with the entire book this week, I'm learning so much, glad I picked it up.

What I should have said was,Dominicans who are Americanized.:)
 

hammerdown

Bronze
Apr 29, 2005
1,401
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Salon Anna is located across from Friends Rest. in downtown Cabarete.......yes CCCCCCCCC she does have a pretty good butt, but its not considered pompi
 

windeguy

Platinum
Jul 10, 2004
33,646
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This could be perfect for you...

[video=youtube;_xdNgL-TOg4]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_xdNgL-TOg4[/video]
 

Criss Colon

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Jan 2, 2002
21,843
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yahoomail.com
When I walk into any store with a bag, and they tell me I have to check it, I ask them if they think I am a thief???
They ALWAYS say "NO!".
Then I ask them why I can't carry my bag???
They NEVER have an answer.I give them one more chance to let me enter, and then I leave.
The Dominican theory of economics is this:
It is better to sell one "Widget" at 10 dollars and make a profit of 8 dollars, than to sell 10 "Widgets" at 5 dollars and make 30 dollars!
And NO ONE can change their minds!
CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
 

Givadogahome

Silver
Sep 27, 2011
4,397
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I would put the book down (or pamphlet if it about Dominican culture and enforced law) it is lying to you. Don't believe what you read or people tell you, that is a sure way of getting it wrong.
You seem a bit uptight for DR I do have to say. Your life is going to be soooooo stressful here with your requirements and demands on Dominican society. You can't live regimental (it's a mess) or over judgmental here (you will end up looking down on everyone), or over opinionated (you will be continuously moaning and people will get bored of you).

I think you need to change down a gear or two and get with the flow of things, you seem to be thinking way too much, if you do that you will not be around for long, you will get sick quick.

As far as the barber is concerned, I'd leave it with him, he doesn't deserve another shot, that is not over charging that is daylight robbery, I'd be pretty pi$$ed if I'd been taken for a mug in such a way.

Good luck with it all, just chill out a little.
 
May 5, 2007
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I went to the local barber yesterday to get my hair cut(and my mustache trimmed), and though the barber did a good job, I'm thinking of switching because I suspect he overcharges and he made several mistakes in dealing with me. When greeting him near his place of business he shook my hand and his grip was totally weak, I mean his handshake was a joke. A man with a weak handshake is a weak man that can't be trusted, and I have little respect for men who have soft handshakes.

The second mistake he made was in telling me that he is my "friend." This is only my second time using this guy's service and I don't even think he knows my first name. How on Earth can you call yourself someone's friend when you don't even know him? I'm also suspicious of people who emphasize friendship through words; if you're truly a friend you don't have to say it, you will show it. What do you guys pay for a haircut down in the DR? Letting me know the rates you pay will let me know whether I'm being overcharged, which I suspect that I am.

There is another thing about this guy that bothers me. His barbershop has been practically empty each time I've gone by. That makes me even less inclined to do business with him. If other people are not patronizing his business, why should I? Anyways, I've been pretty observant since moving down here. I size up businesses and individuals fast.....and if they don't measure up then I stop dealing with them forever. Anyways, the barber yesterday totally failed. The sad thing about it is that I was planning on using his services for many years to come, even taking my future sons there to get haircuts.

Life is really tough, huh?
 
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