Insulated Concrete Foam

Tom0910

Active member
Sep 28, 2015
419
17
38
Faster,cheaper and a LOT cooler. A great product when done right,a disaster when not done correctly,Casa Linda had major problems with quite a few homes when they first started using it,then they started applying a mesh prior to the concrete skim coat and last I heard they have had no problems since but I saw first hand the cracks in the walls of a few homes that were built with insulated foam,ugly.
 

A&B Montecristi

New member
Apr 25, 2020
5
1
3
Montecristi
Faster,cheaper and a LOT cooler. A great product when done right,a disaster when not done correctly,Casa Linda had major problems with quite a few homes when they first started using it,then they started applying a mesh prior to the concrete skim coat and last I heard they have had no problems since but I saw first hand the cracks in the walls of a few homes that were built with insulated foam,ugly.
This is great info! Thank you!! What city is Casa Linda in? I'm going to see if maybe I can contact them and see who they used.
 

etolw

Well-known member
Oct 6, 2018
702
112
63
Casa Linda is a gated community in Sosua.
Do not go there just these days after dark. It is a long and winding road from the center and the beach. Their restaurant is good, but once they turned me down and gave me a shitty table. I had an reservation.

Haters gonna hate. Have not supported them since. Guess it is quiet there now
 

ctrob

Well-known member
Nov 9, 2006
5,152
234
63
If your intention is to have a well insulated and comfortable home in the DR, there is a better way. Any time you stray from local building practices, the price goes up accordingly. And anytime you opt to use a "system" that somebody has dreamed up, you will pay more per square foot of home. With foam panels, they are insulating both sides of a concrete wall. Are they trying to insulate the concrete wall from both sides? You're paying a lot of money for a simple concrete form, and you're wasting that concrete mass that could help keep your home cool.

Whenever insulating a home, it is always best to keep the elements out of the interior - rather than try to control the temperature after the home heats up. Construction methods in the DR lend themselves perfectly to doing that.

You start with a masonry/concrete construction. Normal local techniques, and the most cost effective. Once the shell is up, you insulate the exterior of that shell, wrapping the entire masonry/concrete "mass" of concrete with a protective insulated shell. As your interior cools (from AC, from a cool floor, from cool nightly breeze) those walls and ceiling will act as a giant "flywheel" and help maintain a steady comfortable temp thruout the next day as the sun comes up and starts beating down on those walls (don't forget to insulate the roof). You'll be able to maintain that steady comfortable temp because of the insulated Blue Board wrap around the exterior.

No styrofoam on the interior of your home, only stucco and tile.
Normal building techniques, so local construction pricing, and local available labor prices
The only additional cost is adding the styrofoam exterior layer - normal blue board, no "systems" to buy
No design limitations - build as you please, then wrap with blue board/stucco

This construction method absolutely works, and you'll use a ton less AC with it. If you coupled the above method with some type of earth cooling system, you may even need a small fireplace for those frosty Caribbean nights. How cool would that be?

Here's how it looks going up. Concrete/Mansonry construction, they wrap with blue board, then a Stucco finish. Easy.


Foundation-Insulation-Parging-Detail-1.jpg
 

A&B Montecristi

New member
Apr 25, 2020
5
1
3
Montecristi
If your intention is to have a well insulated and comfortable home in the DR, there is a better way. Any time you stray from local building practices, the price goes up accordingly. And anytime you opt to use a "system" that somebody has dreamed up, you will pay more per square foot of home. With foam panels, they are insulating both sides of a concrete wall. Are they trying to insulate the concrete wall from both sides? You're paying a lot of money for a simple concrete form, and you're wasting that concrete mass that could help keep your home cool.

Whenever insulating a home, it is always best to keep the elements out of the interior - rather than try to control the temperature after the home heats up. Construction methods in the DR lend themselves perfectly to doing that.

You start with a masonry/concrete construction. Normal local techniques, and the most cost effective. Once the shell is up, you insulate the exterior of that shell, wrapping the entire masonry/concrete "mass" of concrete with a protective insulated shell. As your interior cools (from AC, from a cool floor, from cool nightly breeze) those walls and ceiling will act as a giant "flywheel" and help maintain a steady comfortable temp thruout the next day as the sun comes up and starts beating down on those walls (don't forget to insulate the roof). You'll be able to maintain that steady comfortable temp because of the insulated Blue Board wrap around the exterior.

No styrofoam on the interior of your home, only stucco and tile.
Normal building techniques, so local construction pricing, and local available labor prices
The only additional cost is adding the styrofoam exterior layer - normal blue board, no "systems" to buy
No design limitations - build as you please, then wrap with blue board/stucco

This construction method absolutely works, and you'll use a ton less AC with it. If you coupled the above method with some type of earth cooling system, you may even need a small fireplace for those frosty Caribbean nights. How cool would that be?

Here's how it looks going up. Concrete/Mansonry construction, they wrap with blue board, then a Stucco finish. Easy.


View attachment 2682
Thank you for all the information!! Our dream budget is $40,000 for 1400 sqft. We have spoken to the company regarding the insulated foam and it's about $1,000 US. We'd need to pay for labor. That's why I was wondering if anyone knew of a company that has used this material. There are experienced contractors in Santo Domingo but they won't come out here for a cheap price 😁

-Alyssa
 

janlindy

Member
Mar 8, 2011
251
1
18
there is one going up in Cabrera (narjahito???) area. have no idea of who is doing the work.