Interesting pair of videos...

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KyleMackey

Guest
More nonsense regarding the poor Haitian people. When will the Haitian government be held responsible for what it continuously does to it's own people.
What government? They steal everything and then depart for Europe, or N. America, just like Africans. That is the culture that is in the DNA.
 
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cavok

Guest
Some people got all bent out of shape when they heard the truth - Haiti is a sh*thole.
 
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Cdn_Gringo

Guest
We know that Haitians know how to stage a revolution and overthrow dictatorships that don't serve the public interest. With a population of 10 million and little in the way of a formal military, what is the caring population waiting for? The internal problems are many and the road to prosperity quite long. However, without a succession of representative govts that are committed to the public good, caring is just not enough. One could rightly say, the population doesn't care enough to do anything about their failed state.

Apparently it is easier to cut down Dominican tress, use Dominican hospitals and treat the border as if it is their personal golden brick road.
 
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PICHARDO

Guest
PICHARDO, what is your take on this video?
I would say that it's a very interesting and fresh view of the DR-Haiti debacle from a non-Dominican/Non-Biased perspective based on facts, not opinions. The underlying truths that to this point have always been selectively ignored and replaced by political correctness.
 
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cobraboy

Guest
In fairness, many of the images in the second video are post earthquake and do not necessarily represent the whole country. Not that the whole country is pristine by any stretch of the imagination.

There are many intelligent Haitians who want the best for their country and despise the corruption and criminality in their gubmint.

Problem, there aren't emough of them to make a difference.

I doubt Haiti can fix itself. The only hope would be for the planet to pool resources and take over every aspect of Haitian gubmint and infrastructure, including intense policing and military presence in every neighborhood. Have hand-picked Haitians work side-by-side with professional administrators and managers* for on-the-job training. It would take building some big prisons.

It would cost BILLIONS and take a couple of decades before taking off the training wheels.

But would that even work?




*The weakness is in who the bureaucrats are. If they are the typical PC UN-type pinheads, the plan would be a failure. The bureaucrats would have to be hard-nosed, take-no-nonsense types who aren't particulary concerned with hurt feels and are only botton-line result-orientated.
 
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cobraboy

Guest
My two visits to Haiti were eye-opening. It was both worse and better than I expected. I think I posted blog posts and three videos about those trips on DR1 before.
 
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Caonabo

Guest
No, it is not. I lived in Haiti for 5 years. I know the culture and the people. They're not very good at a lot of things, but they do care.
I am sorry to be the person to inform you, but 5 years does not make a lifetime, nor one an expert on a foreign land, it's people, or it's culture.
 
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Naked_Snake

Guest
My two visits to Haiti were eye-opening. It was both worse and better than I expected. I think I posted blog posts and three videos about those trips on DR1 before.
Repost them here again pls.
 
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cobraboy

Guest
Background:

"MotoCaribe is working on a huge project that involves filming in Haiti. To maximize time, money and content, we’ve been requesting an appointment with the Minister of Tourism of the Haitian government.

And after many months, her office called on December 17th: “Can you meet with the Minister on December 26th in her office in Port-a-Prince?”

You bet we would. We’d crawl over crushed glass to meet her.

We decided to go on Christmas Day, early in the morning, because we had an invitation for Christmas Dinner at the residence of a ranking officer of the US Embassy in Haiti.

Along the way, and on our trip in Haiti, we took some pictures and videos.

The trip was a fantastic success, and we’ll be back for the film production. And if all goes really well, we might even start an annual tour through Haiti for the truly adventurous riders.

If you ever wanted to know what crossing the Haiti-DR border and travelling in and around Port-a-Prince is like, enjoy these videos:

https://vimeo.com/83204881
 
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PICHARDO

Guest
In fairness, many of the images in the second video are post earthquake and do not necessarily represent the whole country. Not that the whole country is pristine by any stretch of the imagination.

There are many intelligent Haitians who want the best for their country and despise the corruption and criminality in their gubmint.

Problem, there aren't emough of them to make a difference.

I doubt Haiti can fix itself. The only hope would be for the planet to pool resources and take over every aspect of Haitian gubmint and infrastructure, including intense policing and military presence in every neighborhood. Have hand-picked Haitians work side-by-side with professional administrators and managers* for on-the-job training. It would take building some big prisons.

It would cost BILLIONS and take a couple of decades before taking off the training wheels.

But would that even work?




*The weakness is in who the bureaucrats are. If they are the typical PC UN-type pinheads, the plan would be a failure. The bureaucrats would have to be hard-nosed, take-no-nonsense types who aren't particulary concerned with hurt feels and are only botton-line result-orientated.

It's my educated opinion that Haiti needs an external government with a complete re-write of their constitution (one of the problems of their present status quo). I think they can copy and alter to their needs the DR's present constitution to a large degree and make the most of it. With a new Law system based more on international laws than local.

The Haitian language, is at best an incomplete young makeshift language. It's impossible to use with technical terms, forget about any higher technical/professional use. It's a language that allowed the many tribes that made up the initial state to communicate sans much education.

It's a useless language beyond that practical use today. Should it be continued spoken? Yes, why not. But not for education and all other communications in society, as a living language of their roots, nothing more.

Language is a mobility/trade need. There are two main languages in our half of the world: English and Spanish.

As for the economy, there lies the key to Haiti's becoming a functioning state.

Once a new constitution (styled to that of the DR or any other for the region) is changed and modified enough, foreign investors would be willing to sink cash into Haiti. All private money is better than loans or donations.

Let privateers fund tolled roads that interconnect the major provinces. Local infrastructure like water/sewers/electricity as well can be privateers with no government intervention.

As far as local roads go, this is where private developers will pay their interest in gold. Haiti needs redevelopment quite bad, the city center looks like cr*p. A net requirement that all development in city blocks must follow a complete revilitizing of the roads is paramount.

Just getting loans that will drawn Haiti's economy for decades on end, is not an option for the development of infrastructure. It all needs privateers. Airports, ports, etc...

Creating a bidding process open to all. It's a 10 million and growing market after all. It can only go up.

That's what I think anyhow. IMHO.
 
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NanSanPedro

Guest
It's my educated opinion that Haiti needs an external government with a complete re-write of their constitution (one of the problems of their present status quo). I think they can copy and alter to their needs the DR's present constitution to a large degree and make the most of it. With a new Law system based more on international laws than local.

The Haitian language, is at best an incomplete young makeshift language. It's impossible to use with technical terms, forget about any higher technical/professional use. It's a language that allowed the many tribes that made up the initial state to communicate sans much education.

It's a useless language beyond that practical use today. Should it be continued spoken? Yes, why not. But not for education and all other communications in society, as a living language of their roots, nothing more.

Language is a mobility/trade need. There are two main languages in our half of the world: English and Spanish.

As for the economy, there lies the key to Haiti's becoming a functioning state.

Once a new constitution (styled to that of the DR or any other for the region) is changed and modified enough, foreign investors would be willing to sink cash into Haiti. All private money is better than loans or donations.

Let privateers fund tolled roads that interconnect the major provinces. Local infrastructure like water/sewers/electricity as well can be privateers with no government intervention.

As far as local roads go, this is where private developers will pay their interest in gold. Haiti needs redevelopment quite bad, the city center looks like cr*p. A net requirement that all development in city blocks must follow a complete revilitizing of the roads is paramount.

Just getting loans that will drawn Haiti's economy for decades on end, is not an option for the development of infrastructure. It all needs privateers. Airports, ports, etc...

Creating a bidding process open to all. It's a 10 million and growing market after all. It can only go up.

That's what I think anyhow. IMHO.
I tend to agree with most of what you say. I would argue that they should adopt the French language and not Spanish, due to many already having a passing knowledge of French. Some are actually quite fluent.

The culture also has to change and foreigners need to help. No more handouts. Don't work? Don't eat. Small business loans should be much more available.

I love your idea about capitalists helping to improve the infrastructure in exchange for serious tax breaks.

We also need to ensure that taxes that are paid are equal and enforced. One of the impediments to investment is the use of a random number generator to calculate the import/export tariffs.

Corruption has to be dealt with seriously. 20 years in prison sounds about right, with maybe 3 weeks off for good behavior.

There is more that needs to be done, but this would be a great start.
 
C

Caonabo

Guest
I tend to agree with most of what you say. I would argue that they should adopt the French language and not Spanish, due to many already having a passing knowledge of French. Some are actually quite fluent.

The culture also has to change and foreigners need to help. No more handouts. Don't work? Don't eat. Small business loans should be much more available.

I love your idea about capitalists helping to improve the infrastructure in exchange for serious tax breaks.

We also need to ensure that taxes that are paid are equal and enforced. One of the impediments to investment is the use of a random number generator to calculate the import/export tariffs.

Corruption has to be dealt with seriously. 20 years in prison sounds about right, with maybe 3 weeks off for good behavior.

There is more that needs to be done, but this would be a great start.
What are your thoughts regarding Chinese investment in Haiti? For example, the capitalists you speak of originating from China?
 
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PICHARDO

Guest
I tend to agree with most of what you say. I would argue that they should adopt the French language and not Spanish, due to many already having a passing knowledge of French. Some are actually quite fluent.

The culture also has to change and foreigners need to help. No more handouts. Don't work? Don't eat. Small business loans should be much more available.

I love your idea about capitalists helping to improve the infrastructure in exchange for serious tax breaks.

We also need to ensure that taxes that are paid are equal and enforced. One of the impediments to investment is the use of a random number generator to calculate the import/export tariffs.

Corruption has to be dealt with seriously. 20 years in prison sounds about right, with maybe 3 weeks off for good behavior.

There is more that needs to be done, but this would be a great start.
Like I said, there are two major languages in this side of the hemisphere and French is not one of them.
It would be useless unless they want to become France’s anew colony.
French is only spoken by a minority of Haitians.

Time for Haiti to identify with their peers on this side of the pond.
 
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Naked_Snake

Guest
Like I said, there are two major languages in this side of the hemisphere and French is not one of them.
It would be useless unless they want to become France’s anew colony.
French is only spoken by a minority of Haitians.

Time for Haiti to identify with their peers on this side of the pond.
They would become Lusophones before that ever gets to happen, believe me.
 
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cavok

Guest
The lack of trees, especially palm trees, and vegetation is even more striking from the ground than from the air. It looks barren and arid - not tropical at all. I didn't see anything that would make me want to go there.
 
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NanSanPedro

Guest
What are your thoughts regarding Chinese investment in Haiti? For example, the capitalists you speak of originating from China?
I can't see how China would benefit. They already have an over-abundance of cheap labor, which right now is the only thing Haiti can offer (except possibly for a black tourist destination).

I would think that American, Canadian, and European textiles and light manufacturing of durable goods is where the investment is most likely to come from.