Interesting pair of videos...

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cavok

Guest
In a lot of the foreign investment projects that the Chinese make, from what I've heard, they bring their own labor with them.
 
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cobraboy

Guest
I can't see how China would benefit. They already have an over-abundance of cheap labor, which right now is the only thing Haiti can offer (except possibly for a black tourist destination).

I would think that American, Canadian, and European textiles and light manufacturing of durable goods is where the investment is most likely to come from.
If China invests in Haiti it would not be for economic reasons, but geo-political strategic reasons.

They want to test the US resolve of the Monroe Doctrine.

Getting some gold in Haiti would be a bonus.
 
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KyleMackey

Guest
I can't see how China would benefit. They already have an over-abundance of cheap labor, which right now is the only thing Haiti can offer (except possibly for a black tourist destination).

I would think that American, Canadian, and European textiles and light manufacturing of durable goods is where the investment is most likely to come from.
In this case the DR right next door is more reliable with better infrastructure.
 
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KyleMackey

Guest
In a lot of the foreign investment projects that the Chinese make, from what I've heard, they bring their own labor with them.
They do. It is their own engineering firms and Chinese workers. They also run the projects they build. If X country can't afford to pay back the loans they will confiscate the asset also. They run the entire electrical grid in 1 African country.
 
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Naked_Snake

Guest
In this case the DR right next door is more reliable with better infrastructure.
After the fracas with Félix Bautista and the Odebretch funds, I dont think they are too keen about us getting there, Grupo M FTZ notwithstanding. Although I agree that someone like Gonzalo Castillo with sufficient funds could do miracles there as he has been doing on our Southwest region.
 
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cobraboy

Guest
They do. It is their own engineering firms and Chinese workers. They also run the projects they build. If X country can't afford to pay back the loans they will confiscate the asset also. They run the entire electrical grid in 1 African country.
Didn't the ChiComs takeover the entire transportation infrastructure, or at least the entire railway system, in an African country?

Confessions of an Economic Hit Man: interesting book and a worthy read.
 
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cavok

Guest
They do. It is their own engineering firms and Chinese workers. They also run the projects they build. If X country can't afford to pay back the loans they will confiscate the asset also. They run the entire electrical grid in 1 African country.
And good luck to those countries that try to oppose the confiscation of those assets. The Chinese won't hesitate to send in their army to protect them. The Chinese are no "Mr. Nice Guy".
 
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KyleMackey

Guest
Didn't the ChiComs takeover the entire transportation infrastructure, or at least the entire railway system, in an African country?

Confessions of an Economic Hit Man: interesting book and a worthy read.
They control rail lines, transit, and shipping ports in other countries. Sometimes they have to save face and hire locals, but not in management.
 
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Caonabo

Guest
I can't see how China would benefit. They already have an over-abundance of cheap labor, which right now is the only thing Haiti can offer (except possibly for a black tourist destination).

I would think that American, Canadian, and European textiles and light manufacturing of durable goods is where the investment is most likely to come from.
So you would take these types of investments which are currently in the RD, and move them to Haiti?
 
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Caonabo

Guest
Perhaps all of the successful Haitian businessmen globally can form a conglomerate to build something of their own country, because currently there is nothing worth saving.
 
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NanSanPedro

Guest
So you would take these types of investments which are currently in the RD, and move them to Haiti?
It would take incentives to do that. My guess is the labor is cheaper there than here, but it can't be by too much because labor here is relatively inexpensive by USA standards. So the best way to incentivize would be tax rebates and/or tax abolition. It would take a lot to do, no argument. But I believe it's doable.
 
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KyleMackey

Guest
It would take incentives to do that. My guess is the labor is cheaper there than here, but it can't be by too much because labor here is relatively inexpensive by USA standards. So the best way to incentivize would be tax rebates and/or tax abolition. It would take a lot to do, no argument. But I believe it's doable.
USA and DR already have the CAFTA trade agreement in place for a long time now.
 
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Caonabo

Guest
As expected, you would have no problem taking from RD to give to Haiti. This is usually the knee jerk train of thought for most foreigners who like to enter the mix in the name of being a part of the solution. How compassionate.
(in reference to posting #53)
 
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NanSanPedro

Guest
As expected, you would have no problem taking from RD to give to Haiti. This is usually the knee jerk train of thought for most foreigners who like to enter the mix in the name of being a part of the solution. How compassionate.
(in reference to posting #53)
It's called competition and the law of supply and demand. All foreign businesses "took" from their native labor force and "gave" to the DR.

You really need to chill.
 
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Naked_Snake

Guest
It would take incentives to do that. My guess is the labor is cheaper there than here, but it can't be by too much because labor here is relatively inexpensive by USA standards. So the best way to incentivize would be tax rebates and/or tax abolition. It would take a lot to do, no argument. But I believe it's doable.
What's your opinion on the Labadee experiment?
 
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NanSanPedro

Guest
What's your opinion on the Labadee experiment?
I haven't been to Labadee in over 8 years. I'm not sure what it looks like now. I can tell you though when I was there I did not like it at all from what I saw. Haitians were excluded from their own country and there is something wrong about that.
 
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cobraboy

Guest
I haven't been to Labadee in over 8 years. I'm not sure what it looks like now. I can tell you though when I was there I did not like it at all from what I saw. Haitians were excluded from their own country and there is something wrong about that.
Just curious, but are you Haitian?
 
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Caonabo

Guest
It's called competition and the law of supply and demand. All foreign businesses "took" from their native labor force and "gave" to the DR.

You really need to chill.
No, it's called taking from others, to once again give to dear old poor Haiti. When is Haiti held responsible? When does the "taking and giving" end? For the record, I have a little bit more than five years time on this issue, and yes, some skin in the game as well.