It’s the police’s time to line up to get paid in checks

malko

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Jan 12, 2013
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I reluctantly tend to agree with you. The reality is that lying is seen as a bad thing in countries like the US. Children are taught from a very early age that it's wrong to lie, and people who consistently lie are ostracised. And in DR the values are different. Everyone dreams of being a politician so they can steal some money, not so that they can bring about change or make the country a better place.

I think this is one of the hardest parts of living here, trying to understand that people are wired differently and have different sets of ethics.

I don't agree, the real problem is the lack of consequences, in the DR.
Dominicans tend to forgive very fast and easily.
They will get annoyed/angry fast, but everything is forgotten in a matter of days.

It's risk vs reward more than ethics.
If I lie back home on a loan application at the bank, I will be found out ( probably ) and I will be in a world of pain for a very long time.
Do the same here, and you probably will not be found out, and even you were, you could just shrug it off and try it again on a few days.
 

CristoRey

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Apr 1, 2014
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I don't agree, the real problem is the lack of consequences, in the DR.
Dominicans tend to forgive very fast and easily.
They will get annoyed/angry fast, but everything is forgotten in a matter of days.

It's risk vs reward more than ethics.
If I lie back home on a loan application at the bank, I will be found out ( probably ) and I will be in a world of pain for a very long time.
Do the same here, and you probably will not be found out, and even you were, you could just shrug it off and try it again on a few days.
Welcome To Wonderland.
 

MariaRubia

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Jun 25, 2019
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It's not universal. The Dominicanos/as and Haitianos/as I count as friends are not that way at all. Now, most of my circle of friends, outside of my barrio, are from church or from a Christian organization.

I also agree. I have some very good Dominican friends here, people that I trust and respect completely and love like they are my family. I am just saying that in the course of a normal day in DR, I almost always am lied to at some point (not by my friends but by others) and nobody seems to think it matters. I struggle to see how anyone can think that stealing from a budget intended to help orphans isn't wrong, or how the first thing that some people do when they see a body lying in the road is to see if they can steal the wallet. There are just some behaviours that Dominicans generally think are OK which I will never find acceptable. And I know for a fact that some expats who have come to live here have sold up and left precisely because they have found the lack of compassion and ethics to be hard to deal with.
 

RDKNIGHT

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Mar 13, 2017
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Uh....
Ya lost me.
Not sure what I said to encourage this type of response. I'm convinced 100% it's a cultural thing. Zero to do with an individual's education or lack thereof.
Sadly lying, cheating and stealing (being clever) are all intricate parts of day to day life in this country. Zero chance it will change during the course of this current administration.
I concur ... we got a thesis from Mr Saunders.......
 

drstock

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Oct 29, 2010
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Whenever people say to me "you're so lucky to be able to live there" I always say it's actually a very hard place to live compared to somewhere like the US or Europe.
Personally, I feel pretty lucky to live here and certainly find it easier than living in Europe. It's not so hard if you do your best to keep out of trouble. Things like the dishonesty and corruption of the police I find very objectionable, but they don't spoil my life on a daily basis.
 

Grampa

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Nov 15, 2021
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Maria and Cristo, what do you find so hard and challenging bout living in the DR?

Anyone else feel free to comment if you live in the DR too.
 
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william webster

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I don't find it too onerous.... I'm careful and not in a tourist area.
I find we (ex-pats) are well accepted.....
people are tolerant of our Spanish if it's bad, helpful when/if we need it.... all in all, not difficult at all

Sure, some things are frustrating and some things can be difficult.... but many things are EASY!!

If you cultivate a good network, you'll be fine......
 

MariaRubia

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Jun 25, 2019
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Maria and Cristo, what do you find so hard and challenging bout living in the DR?

Anyone else feel free to comment if you live in the DR too.

The main thing for me is the lack of compassion. I just see so many examples of people who make it clear that they don't give a f'ck about anyone else apart from themselves every day. You see it in Dominican driving, someone is trying to change lanes and nobody tries to help them. You see it in a hospital, someone enters screaming in pain and the only thing that matters is if they have insurance, if not then get out, nobody remotely bothered. You see it anytime someone is in trouble and needs help, the general attitude is not to help and to stay away. I've thought about it long and hard what I don't like here, and I think the lack of compassion is the biggest thing.

I do business here and it just feels that the general way business is conducted is to try to find the best way to screw someone. Suppliers think that they are doing you a favor by selling you something, promises are frequently broken, nothing happens on time. And in terms of employing people, work is usually seen as a way of making money, nothing else. Very few people seem to love their jobs, most can't wait to be fired so they get their liquidacion. Doing business here is really really hard going, I don't think I've ever worked anywhere quite as difficult.

And the other thing I would throw in is how expensive it is getting here. Restaurant prices in the capital are now getting close to London or New York. The other day dinner for four in Jalao was US$ 320. And the food was not good. We went to Juan Dolio for a day at the beach, two people, lunch and a couple of beers, US$ 120. And when you start to compare the quality of the service, the quality of the food, the comfort of the chair that you're sitting at, it's just nowhere near what you get in other cities.
 

MariaRubia

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Jun 25, 2019
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I don't find it too onerous.... I'm careful and not in a tourist area.
I find we (ex-pats) are well accepted.....
people are tolerant of our Spanish if it's bad, helpful when/if we need it.... all in all, not difficult at all

Sure, some things are frustrating and some things can be difficult.... but many things are EASY!!

If you cultivate a good network, you'll be fine......

Just to add I speak Spanish fluently (I was married to a Cuban before I came here and learnt it through many years of shouting at him). And I do well here, I have good connections, I manage to get things done, I don't know any expats at all and all my friends and colleagues are Dominican.
 

keepcoming

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May 25, 2011
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The main thing for me is the lack of compassion. I just see so many examples of people who make it clear that they don't give a f'ck about anyone else apart from themselves every day. You see it in Dominican driving, someone is trying to change lanes and nobody tries to help them. You see it in a hospital, someone enters screaming in pain and the only thing that matters is if they have insurance, if not then get out, nobody remotely bothered. You see it anytime someone is in trouble and needs help, the general attitude is not to help and to stay away. I've thought about it long and hard what I don't like here, and I think the lack of compassion is the biggest thing.

I do business here and it just feels that the general way business is conducted is to try to find the best way to screw someone. Suppliers think that they are doing you a favor by selling you something, promises are frequently broken, nothing happens on time. And in terms of employing people, work is usually seen as a way of making money, nothing else. Very few people seem to love their jobs, most can't wait to be fired so they get their liquidacion. Doing business here is really really hard going, I don't think I've ever worked anywhere quite as difficult.

And the other thing I would throw in is how expensive it is getting here. Restaurant prices in the capital are now getting close to London or New York. The other day dinner for four in Jalao was US$ 320. And the food was not good. We went to Juan Dolio for a day at the beach, two people, lunch and a couple of beers, US$ 120. And when you start to compare the quality of the service, the quality of the food, the comfort of the chair that you're sitting at, it's just nowhere near what you get in other cities.
Why do it then? Why bother? I am curious because I hear it a lot. Having compassion for where you live is important. I have been here now for over 26 years ( I truly loose count). I have family members who are police (via spouse) who welcome this. It can be exhausting at times living here but, in the end, I do not let others determine my compassion/respect for living life here. Other's compassion or lack of does not reflect mine nor do I allow it too. When the negative outweighs the positive, for me it is time to move on.
 
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Big

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Apr 24, 2019
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The main thing for me is the lack of compassion. I just see so many examples of people who make it clear that they don't give a f'ck about anyone else apart from themselves every day. You see it in Dominican driving, someone is trying to change lanes and nobody tries to help them. You see it in a hospital, someone enters screaming in pain and the only thing that matters is if they have insurance, if not then get out, nobody remotely bothered. You see it anytime someone is in trouble and needs help, the general attitude is not to help and to stay away. I've thought about it long and hard what I don't like here, and I think the lack of compassion is the biggest thing.

I do business here and it just feels that the general way business is conducted is to try to find the best way to screw someone. Suppliers think that they are doing you a favor by selling you something, promises are frequently broken, nothing happens on time. And in terms of employing people, work is usually seen as a way of making money, nothing else. Very few people seem to love their jobs, most can't wait to be fired so they get their liquidacion. Doing business here is really really hard going, I don't think I've ever worked anywhere quite as difficult.

And the other thing I would throw in is how expensive it is getting here. Restaurant prices in the capital are now getting close to London or New York. The other day dinner for four in Jalao was US$ 320. And the food was not good. We went to Juan Dolio for a day at the beach, two people, lunch and a couple of beers, US$ 120. And when you start to compare the quality of the service, the quality of the food, the comfort of the chair that you're sitting at, it's just nowhere near what you get in other cities.
Ajuala and La Cassina are my go to spots in Santo Domingo. I cant get out of there for less than 150.00 U.S, (after dinner drinks 200.00 plus) The food and service however is superb.
 

MariaRubia

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Jun 25, 2019
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Why do it then? Why bother? I am curious because I hear it a lot.

To be honest I am spending less and less time here. But I do need to come as I have business and family here and it's difficult to unravel ties.

And I was asked to list the negatives which I did. There are also a lot of positives about DR.
 
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Grampa

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To be honest I am spending less and less time here. But I do need to come as I have business and family here and it's difficult to unravel ties.

And I was asked to list the negatives which I did. There are also a lot of positives about DR.
I'd love to hear your, and other's, positives too. Perhaps even more importantly than the negatives.

I tend no matter where I am to find the good things and to avoid or minimize the negatives. For me most of the negatives are the expats and tourists, and overpriced places especially when they don't deliver on the quality and service. I do my best to avoid them and don't need them for any business interests so win/win.
 

MariaRubia

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Jun 25, 2019
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I'd love to hear your, and other's, positives too. Perhaps even more importantly than the negatives.

I tend no matter where I am to find the good things and to avoid or minimize the negatives. For me most of the negatives are the expats and tourists, and overpriced places especially when they don't deliver on the quality and service. I do my best to avoid them and don't need them for any business interests so win/win.

I tend to focus on the positive as well. But sometimes this place wears you down. I'm trying to work to a deadline but nobody arrives on time. Or when they do arrive they don't have the right equipment, or they just spend hours talking to some random woman on their phone and then say they have to pop out to do a diligencia. And no matter how good your Plan B's you have, you still always need a Plan C, D and E. And it's just little things like dishonesty. Yesterday I had given a machine to one of my staff and shown him how to use it. It was working fine. He gave it back and a piece is missing, and now it won't work. Nobody else touched it, but he swears it had nothing to do with him. And it so clearly did, and now I have to deal with a) getting the part replaced and b) dealing with the fact that he thinks it's Ok to blatantly lie. In my country he would have said "oh sh!t I think I've broken the machine, I'm sorry let me get it fixed" but here you go through hours and hours of him telling you that he is a man of honour and he doesn't like the fact that I am questioning him like this and blacka blacka blacka. I had to call 19 times to speak to someone at the bank and eventually I gave up and went in, and after being told that everyone was eating their lunch and I needed to come back 2 hours later, and almost exploding, someone graced me with their presence. And just those continuous little battles, over and over and over again, it just wears you down.

It does feel good to get that off my chest.
 

drstock

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Oct 29, 2010
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And the other thing I would throw in is how expensive it is getting here. Restaurant prices in the capital are now getting close to London or New York. The other day dinner for four in Jalao was US$ 320. And the food was not good. We went to Juan Dolio for a day at the beach, two people, lunch and a couple of beers, US$ 120. And when you start to compare the quality of the service, the quality of the food, the comfort of the chair that you're sitting at, it's just nowhere near what you get in other cities.
I agree that prices here have increased recently, but I think it's the same pretty much all over the world now. I haven't been to London recently, but I can't imagine what a meal in the West End at a good restaurant must cost now. Every time I have been to the UK in recent years it has been a nasty shock how expensive everything is and I'm glad I don't have to pay UK prices.

As for eating in the DR, I never pay what you are saying, even in the capital, but then maybe I'm not such a perfectionist as you are!

Anyway, just to bring it back on-topic, maybe restaurant prices will have to come down if there aren't all these fake police getting fat salaries.
 
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