It’s the police’s time to line up to get paid in checks

bob saunders

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The main thing for me is the lack of compassion. I just see so many examples of people who make it clear that they don't give a f'ck about anyone else apart from themselves every day. You see it in Dominican driving, someone is trying to change lanes and nobody tries to help them. You see it in a hospital, someone enters screaming in pain and the only thing that matters is if they have insurance, if not then get out, nobody remotely bothered. You see it anytime someone is in trouble and needs help, the general attitude is not to help and to stay away. I've thought about it long and hard what I don't like here, and I think the lack of compassion is the biggest thing.

I do business here and it just feels that the general way business is conducted is to try to find the best way to screw someone. Suppliers think that they are doing you a favor by selling you something, promises are frequently broken, nothing happens on time. And in terms of employing people, work is usually seen as a way of making money, nothing else. Very few people seem to love their jobs, most can't wait to be fired so they get their liquidacion. Doing business here is really really hard going, I don't think I've ever worked anywhere quite as difficult.

And the other thing I would throw in is how expensive it is getting here. Restaurant prices in the capital are now getting close to London or New York. The other day dinner for four in Jalao was US$ 320. And the food was not good. We went to Juan Dolio for a day at the beach, two people, lunch and a couple of beers, US$ 120. And when you start to compare the quality of the service, the quality of the food, the comfort of the chair that you're sitting at, it's just nowhere near what you get in other cities.
Some very valid points, especially about the work ethic. My wife plays hardball with suppliers. Screw up or cheat, somebody else gets our business.
 

MariaRubia

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Jun 25, 2019
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I agree that prices here have increased recently, but I think it's the same pretty much all over the world now. I haven't been to London recently, but I can't imagine what a meal in the West End at a good restaurant must cost now. Every time I have been to the UK in recent years it has been a nasty shock how expensive everything is and I'm glad I don't have to pay UK prices.

As for eating in the DR, I never pay what you are saying, even in the capital, but then maybe I'm not such a perfectionist as you are!

Anyway, just to bring it back on-topic, maybe restaurant prices will have to come down if there aren't all these fake police getting fat salaries.

A burger in the capital is about RD$ 750 plus tax and service pretty much anywhere so RD$ 960 which equates to £12. You could find a burger pretty much anywhere in London for £12, even right in the West End. I'm not particularly a perfectionist. The food we had in Jalao was very average, four plates of food, no desserts, we did drink wine and the boys had beers.
 
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MariaRubia

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Jun 25, 2019
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Some very valid points, especially about the work ethic. My wife plays hardball with suppliers. Screw up or cheat, somebody else gets our business.

I do the same, but most don't care if they have your business or not. I tried the same with the bank, they didn't care. You stress to a supplier how much you've spent with them, how many years you've been doing business, you tell them that you have sales reps from other companies coming over to take that business away and the usual reaction is "Ah bueno, entonces eso es su decision señora".
 

CristoRey

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I do the same, but most don't care if they have your business or not. I tried the same with the bank, they didn't care. You stress to a supplier how much you've spent with them, how many years you've been doing business, you tell them that you have sales reps from other companies coming over to take that business away and the usual reaction is "Ah bueno, entonces eso es su decision señora".
I've worked in the Outsource/ Nearshore industry here for about 8 years. I would have to agree with most of what you've experienced regarding "work" and waiting to get fired.
 
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Grampa

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A burger in the capital is about RD$ 750 plus tax and service pretty much anywhere so RD$ 960 which equates to £12. You could find a burger pretty much anywhere in London for £12, even right in the West End. I'm not particularly a perfectionist. The food we had in Jalao was very average, four plates of food, no desserts, we did drink wine and the boys had beers.
If I stop to check the menu before sitting down I would likely go elsewhere. Unless of course I knew in advance that there was a reason why it might be worth the cost like atmosphere or service. I know for sure, 100% that I can find excellent restaurants where a burger with fries is no more that 500 pesos. I don't eat burgers, or fries, but it makes a good comparison since most places serve them. It's like when in Italy checking to see how much an espresso is. 1 Euro is normal, 3 - 5 is tourist trap prices. Of course some scenarios it's totally worth a 10 Euro spritz or a 5 Euro espresso like when having breakfast up on the hill across from the Coliseum or a Spritz on the Grand Canal.