Living in the Dominican Republic? Here's how to be a better expat

windeguy

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Oh, if you disagree she can not think for herself ? Is that how it works ?

Only conservatives were gifted with a brain?
The social pressure of "woke" liberals in the US is intense. Children are taught this in schools all the way through Universities at this time in the US.
This woman obviously has had some brain washing instilled in her.
 

windeguy

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A wokie (not to be confused with a wookie unless said wokie doesn't ever shave) is someone who ascribes to the woke philosophy, to wit:

1. White supremacy is a or the major problem in the western world.
2. American cops target black and brown individuals to shoot (this of course is contrary to statistics).
3. Systemic racism is keeping the black (and possibly brown) culture(s) down. Again, this is contrary to the myriad of opportunities that all people are given.
4. Whites should stop acting so white. Whatever tf that means.
5. Math is racist.

I'm sure there are more but those are the more obvious ones. The observations the alleged author made are filtered thru her woke-colored glasses. She sees what she wants to see.

Again, there is some truth to what she says in a couple of points. But she loses people, as shown by comments other than myself, when she goes overboard on the wokieisms.
Even a broken clock is correct twice a day.
 
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NALs

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In fact, the article barely mention race, the target audience is gringos which would include me. Gringa morena but still viewed as a gringa (which is fine by me).
Even if it wasn't fine with you, people would still refer to you as la gringa and say things to others such as:

Person 1: Llegó la gringa que no le gusta que le digan gringa. (Points with the lips).

Person 2: ¿Cuál?

Person 1: Esa gringa en la entrada.

Person 2: ¿La morena?

Person 1: Esa misma.

Person 2: Ay Dios mío.

Person 1: Yo te digo a tí. (Makes the face of disbelief).

Person 2: (Laugh)
 
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Africaida

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Even if it wasn't fine with you, people would still refer to you as la gringa and say things to others such as:

Person 1: Llegó la gringa que no le gusta que le digan gringa. (Points with the lips).

Person 2: ¿Cuál?

Person 1: Esa gringa en la entrada.

Person 2: ¿La morena?

Person 1: Esa misma.

Person 2: Ay Dios mío.

Person 1: Yo te digo a tí. (Makes the face of disbelief).

Person 2: (Laugh)

When I first came to Samana about 12 years ago, people would just come up and ask me (escuche que eres gringa, es verdad ? or pero morena/negra de donde vienes??) or just stare at me for hours.

It stopped now because they just assume I am African-American (more and more moving/visiting the area) which I am not. :)

I still get the stares, but don't really notice them anymore.
 

Kricke87

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Feb 16, 2021
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That would 20K for me, being a foreign woman who knows nada about cars 😪

I was trying to buy an ATV, you should see the total porquerias I was shown for 300-500 K pesos, it was insulting. If I dare point out that it is junk, they argue with me. I test drive it for 10 secondes (because they that bad) and they still argue with me. I am like at what point, did you understand that I was trying to commit suicide on a motor ?

The best one is the one that tried to convince me to rent one (brand new) for a year for the affordable price of.....800 USD/month and got mad when I told him that it made no damn sense.

I have stories for days, but that s part of life in paradise 😁
Yeah, I have stories that would last for days. I can just give you two. One where I made my to date worst car deal........ I had been here for 2 years. I had a Suzuki Grand Vitara 2004 I think it was. I had bought it for too much, like 100k overpriced, and was also scammed by the previous owner's son who "was" a lawyer (he got barred from practising law here because he was involved in some shady business) when he charged me almost three times the price for an ownership transfer. Anyways, within a year I had started having troubles with the car, and also I had a colmado at that time with a local, and we were planning on providing deliveries and also to have a truck when buying stuff for ourselves. So I wanted to sell my car to maybe buy a pick-up truck. Well anyways, I went with my father in law and some of his "friends" to try to sell it in Puerto Plata, and they offered like 100k less than it was actually worth. And just as a side point, at that time, I later found out that I had salmonella and parasites, so I was not feeling so great during those days. Anyways, so we skipped that and my father in law didn't have more time to go around and check if someone else would be able to buy it for a fair price. So I dropped him off, while his "friends" suggested that we go to a place because they'd understood that I wanted a pick-up truck, so for some stupid reason I tagged along. So outside of Cabarete there is a place called Islabon, and there is (still?) a small dealer, the owner was from Moca. So they said that we could wait for the owner to come by to look at the car and give his offer in exchange for a pick-up truck. I waited literary 3 hours in the sun, while not feeling great in general, as I felt a bit pressured to wait as they always do "he just called, he'll be here in 30 minutes", which ends up being 3 hours. Finally, he arrives, and he offers me 200k and a red old (-87) Toyota pickup in exchange. And for whatever reason, I went along with it.
To this day I cannot understand why I accepted that deal. The only thing I blame is that I was sooo naive, and I also had some serious health problems.
The Suzuki I had was easily worth 500k at that time, and although when I had bought the pick-up truck it was working, literary within one week it started having serious problems, so basically I think I spent around 100-150k on just fixing whatever was wrong with it, until I finally sold it for 125k.
So within 1 year, I went from having a Suzuki Grand Vitara, which was fairly good, it had its issues, but it would have been so much better to have stuck with it. To Having received in exchange 200k, that I spent the most part of to fixing the pick-up truck that I later sold for 125k, so in the end I had lost more than 300k on that deal.

You live and learn everyday.

The other one that is just so much shorter. One day in that colmado that I had, many times the locals was amazed that a "white guy" was working in a Colmado. But the funniest one was when a guy came in, and he just stared at me for like 1 minute, without saying anything. Until he finally asked, "Hablas español", which I then answered, "No, ni una palabra" and then laughed.

This just shows to me that first of all, a lot, especially car dealers ALWAYS try to scam you, but even more so, if you are a foreigner, and also many many Dominicans think that just because you are an immigrant, you can't speak the language at all.
 
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windeguy

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Someone will say with respect to car dealers that "it happens everywhere".

We aren't everywhere, we are here in the DR and it happens here as much or more than anywhere else.

Just learn to avoid it and get over it.
 

bob saunders

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:)It's in your wife's blood. She will never stop. But for me, I try to ask myself, who needs it more?

Totally agree with your assessment of the alleged author. It's obvious she has been taught all that BS and is unable to think for herself. Hopefully she grows up.
I bought 4 batteries today and installed them. My wife found out after I had bought them and went on a mini rant on how she should have talked to the ferreteria first and got the discount instead of the gringo price.....etc. I let her rant and then showed her the receipt, with the 8 percent discount. Haha
 
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Michael DR

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I was there and saw it first hand. The biggest difference was that the Dominican food was higher in quality than here.
You're clearing not eating in the "right" places in the DR or have no taste LOL

I have come to love good Dominican food and it's not at all hard to find in most places.
 

bob saunders

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Oh, if you disagree she can not think for herself ? Is that how it works ?

Only conservatives were gifted with a brain?
Not sure where you are coming from to get that conclusion from what he said? , I will admit there are some liberals with brains, no progressives though.:):):)
 
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marcosalm

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Nothing else happening in the DR except this worthless gibberish. Is there nothing positive about the land that we have chosen to live in (and probably die in), all you guys do is complain or bicker about this country.....it's not yours.....you're not going to change it. You are a GUEST here regardless of your nationality or citizenship. If you would like to stay.....be a little more positive and try to GIVE something positive instead of wanting everything the way that YOU want. I'm American, 38 years of military service , serving in several conflicts and countless countries around the world ......all I want is PEACE. I think I have found it here in DR ...... WHY do I feel this way, .....ACCEPTANCE .....I accept the Dominican people and their country for what they are for what it is. Yes it is what it is .... that's what you have to realize.....they are and we aren't regardless of citizenship. It's their country, culture and no matter the paperwork......you will never be. Sit back and enjoy.
 

NALs

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Nothing else happening in the DR except this worthless gibberish. Is there nothing positive about the land that we have chosen to live in (and probably die in), all you guys do is complain or bicker about this country.....it's not yours.....you're not going to change it. You are a GUEST here regardless of your nationality or citizenship. If you would like to stay.....be a little more positive and try to GIVE something positive instead of wanting everything the way that YOU want. I'm American, 38 years of military service , serving in several conflicts and countless countries around the world ......all I want is PEACE. I think I have found it here in DR ...... WHY do I feel this way, .....ACCEPTANCE .....I accept the Dominican people and their country for what they are for what it is. Yes it is what it is .... that's what you have to realize.....they are and we aren't regardless of citizenship. It's their country, culture and no matter the paperwork......you will never be. Sit back and enjoy.
The DR1 forums have been like that since ever. If it hasn't change by now, then...
 

Garyexpat

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Instead of insulting him why don't you try to provide "facts" to dispute what he posted. That would be an intelligent response if you disagree instead of just insults. Hmmmmm, perhaps because you have no facts???
 

windeguy

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From FB about the OP:

Can expats effectively move through spaces in developing countries and help to create equity? I have some hope left. So much that I wrote a guide on how to be an active ally that moves with self-awareness in the Dominican Republic.
P.S. On certain forum, I am already being called a "racist, bigoted, narrow-minded, attention-seeking, self-obsessed, Anglophobic, uber-woke author" over this article, so clearly it's worth a read
😂
😂

Read:
 
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windeguy

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Nothing else happening in the DR except this worthless gibberish. Is there nothing positive about the land that we have chosen to live in (and probably die in), all you guys do is complain or bicker about this country.....it's not yours.....you're not going to change it. You are a GUEST here regardless of your nationality or citizenship. If you would like to stay.....be a little more positive and try to GIVE something positive instead of wanting everything the way that YOU want. I'm American, 38 years of military service , serving in several conflicts and countless countries around the world ......all I want is PEACE. I think I have found it here in DR ...... WHY do I feel this way, .....ACCEPTANCE .....I accept the Dominican people and their country for what they are for what it is. Yes it is what it is .... that's what you have to realize.....they are and we aren't regardless of citizenship. It's their country, culture and no matter the paperwork......you will never be. Sit back and enjoy.
Am I, as a naturalized DR citizen still a "guest" here?

DR1 is primarily about the DR. People rarely post about good things anywhere. They just enjoy the good things and don't frequently mention them except on FB where when enjoys a good "whatever it may be at any moment any time anywhere" they post a picture of it. DR1 has never had much of that type of narcissistic behavior like Facebook has.

People post far more often about bad things and problems. That is how most forums like this work. It is what it is.

Trying to change that behavior? You are not the tail that is going to wag that dog of the constant complaining and moaning and whining,,,,

Thank you for your service!
 

bob saunders

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Nothing else happening in the DR except this worthless gibberish. Is there nothing positive about the land that we have chosen to live in (and probably die in), all you guys do is complain or bicker about this country.....it's not yours.....you're not going to change it. You are a GUEST here regardless of your nationality or citizenship. If you would like to stay.....be a little more positive and try to GIVE something positive instead of wanting everything the way that YOU want. I'm American, 38 years of military service , serving in several conflicts and countless countries around the world ......all I want is PEACE. I think I have found it here in DR ...... WHY do I feel this way, .....ACCEPTANCE .....I accept the Dominican people and their country for what they are for what it is. Yes it is what it is .... that's what you have to realize.....they are and we aren't regardless of citizenship. It's their country, culture and no matter the paperwork......you will never be. Sit back and enjoy.
I disagree, once you are a citizen you are an immigrant, and like immigrants in every other country that become citizens you are no longer a guest. I have been married to a Dominicana for 21 years. I would not say I know everything about the culture, but it is my country now.
 

windeguy

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You're clearing not eating in the "right" places in the DR or have no taste LOL

I have come to love good Dominican food and it's not at all hard to find in most places.
I have eaten Dominican food virtually everywhere I have been here in the DR for over 18 years. My family here is Dominican, after all. It is not special food for me. If I left the island, I would never say I had a craving for anything containing a plantain or yucca, rice and beans , DR beef, and other local foods that have virtually no spice other than Maggi/bouillon or salt. The pork and chicken are good when used in better recipes with actual spices and so is some of the sea food here in the land that spice forgot. It is fortunate you find it more to your liking.
 
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NY2STI

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Mar 22, 2020
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From FB about the OP:

Can expats effectively move through spaces in developing countries and help to create equity? I have some hope left. So much that I wrote a guide on how to be an active ally that moves with self-awareness in the Dominican Republic.
P.S. On certain forum, I am already being called a "racist, bigoted, narrow-minded, attention-seeking, self-obsessed, Anglophobic, uber-woke author" over this article, so clearly it's worth a read
😂
😂

Read:
Hey, that was my quote!! Thank you baby cakes, I feel honored and privileged. BTW...That line is copyrighted; send royalties!
Don't forget to dedicate your new book to me! :love:
 
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Africaida

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I disagree, once you are a citizen you are an immigrant, and like immigrants in every other country that become citizens you are no longer a guest. I have been married to a Dominicana for 21 years. I would not say I know everything about the culture, but it is my country now.
Technically, you don't have to be a citizen to be an immigrant. Agree that you no longer a "guest" though, once citizen, it's your adoptive country.
 
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Michael DR

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203
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I have eaten Dominican food virtually everywhere I have been here in the DR for over 18 years. My family here is Dominican, after all. It is not special food for me. If I left the island, I would never say I had a craving for anything containing a plantain or yucca, rice and beans , DR beef, and other local foods that have virtually no spice other than Maggi/bouillon or salt. The pork and chicken are good when used in better recipes with actual spices and so is some of the sea food here in the land that spice forgot. It is fortunate you find it more to your liking.
I rest my case, no taste.
 

Michael DR

Banned
Jun 7, 2020
203
134
43
Earth
From FB about the OP:

Can expats effectively move through spaces in developing countries and help to create equity? I have some hope left. So much that I wrote a guide on how to be an active ally that moves with self-awareness in the Dominican Republic.
P.S. On certain forum, I am already being called a "racist, bigoted, narrow-minded, attention-seeking, self-obsessed, Anglophobic, uber-woke author" over this article, so clearly it's worth a read
😂
😂

Read:

I'm not shocked! :p