Living Options for Recently Arrived Expat

David B

Active member
Aug 31, 2017
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Hi, sorry if this question has been done to death.

I'm an aussie globe-trotting with my 19yr old son and our dog.

We're departing Mexico to live in DR soon, with the intention to stay for maybe a year.

At the moment we're deciding which area to live.

So I'll add a few details of what we'd like in our chosen location and perhaps you could offer some recommendations

Preferences as follows
  • Clean (enough for swimming), dog friendly beaches that aren't packed with gringos
  • Night scene that isn't wall-to-wall pay-to-play professional girls (ill be here a while so I'd like to meet some good girls & have a gf)
  • Easy access to typical amenities like supermarkets & doctors
  • 2 bedroom accommodation choices no more than a brief bicycle ride from the beach for under US$1000/mth
  • Safe
Anywhere come to mind?

Thanks,
Pain

Puerto Plata
 

cavok

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Jun 16, 2014
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Puerto Plata
Puerto Plata would seem to tick off a lot of boxes for the OP, but, I wouldn't want to live there. I guess I just don't like cities. It seems to be very popular with Germans and Italians, but Americans and Canadians - not so much. Very few American and Canadian posters here living in Pto. Plata.
 

cavok

Silver
Jun 16, 2014
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That town has 4 disasterous hearts that are so clogged with plaque there is no hope. Callejón, el "Play", Ciénaga and Barrio Blanco. Folks may have to look at the real numbers on crime, including drug trafficking, murder and general thuggery before investing. There's no way to spin that!
Didn't you used to live in the Callejon? I think that's the problem. All those motos w/o mufflers roaring by your place popping wheelies, roosters crowing and dogs barking all night, and the neighbors blasting reggaeton and dembow at all hours, has poisoned your attitude on Cabarete and you escaped to the relative peace and tranquility of Cabrera.

Don't feel bad. This happens to quite a few gringos who come here wanting an "authentic" Dominican experience, so they move into a barrio - only to find out later that it's a little "too authenic" for them.
 

El Hijo de Manolo

It's outrageous, egregious, preposterous!
Dec 10, 2021
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Didn't you used to live in the Callejon? I think that's the problem. All those motos w/o mufflers roaring by your place popping wheelies, roosters crowing and dogs barking all night, and the neighbors blasting reggaeton and dembow at all hours, has poisoned your attitude on Cabarete and you escaped to the relative peace and tranquility of Cabrera.

Don't feel bad. This happens to quite a few gringos who come here wanting an "authentic" Dominican experience, so they move into a barrio - only to find out later that it's a little "too authenic" for them.
Must of hit a soft spot with you today :ROFLMAO:
 

RDKNIGHT

Bronze
Mar 13, 2017
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Didn't you used to live in the Callejon? I think that's the problem. All those motos w/o mufflers roaring by your place popping wheelies, roosters crowing and dogs barking all night, and the neighbors blasting reggaeton and dembow at all hours, has poisoned your attitude on Cabarete and you escaped to the relative peace and tranquility of Cabrera.

Don't feel bad. This happens to quite a few gringos who come here wanting an "authentic" Dominican experience, so they move into a barrio - only to find out later that it's a little "too authenic" for them.
isn't that the truth. I say live where you can afford ..For me I didn't come here and say I want to live in barrio to be like the locals. I worked my whole life to live somewhere nice..
 

Yourmaninvegas

Well-known member
Feb 16, 2016
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isn't that the truth. I say live where you can afford ..For me I didn't come here and say I want to live in barrio to be like the locals. I worked my whole life to live somewhere nice..
Once again you are keeping it 💯 Bro.
But sometimes you can do both. Live in a barrio to be like the locals and live somewhere nice.
My very first apartment after I moved here was in mi barrio.
I just so happened it was on the edge of it.
I had an ocean view. 🤪

EASTSIDE!!
 

El Hijo de Manolo

It's outrageous, egregious, preposterous!
Dec 10, 2021
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How about just trying to give HELPFUL answers to the OP's questions like the rest of us are doing instead of just trying to score childish, irrelevant points?
Lol. Your obsession with me is creepy. Oh, and I will continue to post my personal opinion of Cabarete, or Puerto Plata or Jimani, for that matter. You, see if we all stopped and heeded the critics we would be at a dead stop. Carry on old boy!

 

mt_net

New member
Mar 19, 2009
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Riding a bike in DR will get you runover or bike-jacked or what? Seems riding isnt recommended but not clear to me why
I haven't been in Mexico enough to know if DR drivers are truly worse than Mexican drivers ... but I would say there is much more traffic here. The sheer volume of vehicles on the road driving erratically here makes cycling a dangerous practice for me personally and I miss it.

Of course it varies WHERE in the country but in general I am always surprised that even in very off the beaten path areas you are rarely alone here.

To give some comparison, when I visited throughout Costa Rica a few years ago. I was pleasantly surprised (compared to DR) at how few vehicles there were moving on the country roads.

For me the sheer volume of vehicles on the road here is the main concern.

As a second factor, a common rule of the road here is that the larger vehicle rules the road. The larger you are the more "right of way" you are entitled too. So you can know that bikes are below motorcycles on that food chain. Just above pedestrians and dogs. It is sad but there is not a culture of respecting cyclists here IMO.
 
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cavok

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Jun 16, 2014
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Add to that the general lack of shoulders on the road which forces you to stay out in the traffic. What shoulders there are are usually in very bad condition and full of potholes. Then add in the propensity of Dominicans to double-park everywhere. I brought my bike with me when I moved here, but it's too risky and nerve wracking for me.
 

Yourmaninvegas

Well-known member
Feb 16, 2016
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You are keeping it 💯 brother @cavok
I am a witness to everything you said about the road conditions that I have seen here in the 🇩🇴
That being said that does not stop the hard core from engaging the activity.
Although I tend to see it occurring very early in the morning. In groups. Often with a vehicle follow up.
 

cavok

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Jun 16, 2014
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Very true. I see some hardcore cyclists out on Hwy 5 and in town from time to time. The overall risky and generally poor conditions just completely ruin the pleasure of cycling for me.
 

AlterEgo

Administrator
Staff member
Jan 9, 2009
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You are keeping it 💯 brother @cavok
I am a witness to everything you said about the road conditions that I have seen here in the 🇩🇴
That being said that does not stop the hard core from engaging the activity.
Although I tend to see it occurring very early in the morning. In groups. Often with a vehicle follow up.
If you’re ever over by Mirador Sur park, southern side, you might see LOTS of bikes, even lanes closed for them.
 
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NanSanPedro

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Apr 12, 2019
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Very true. I see some hardcore cyclists out on Hwy 5 and in town from time to time. The overall risky and generally poor conditions just completely ruin the pleasure of cycling for me.
I see them infrequently on La Autopistas Americas. I have never worn a bike helmet but if I were to ride on the autopista, I surely would.
 

Buzz65

Active member
Jul 13, 2017
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Why not rent a place for a month in different locations and stay longer when you find what you are looking for?