Man Drowned Perla Marina Beaches

anng3

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Jan 12, 2007
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It is all over facebook that Carter King Pierce drowned at Perla Marina beach and the
police are trying to reach his family. If anyone knows him please contact the police.
 

El Rey de Mangu

No peeky panee my love
Sep 22, 2009
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Swimming anywhere without lifeguards and rescue equipment is a risk especially if the sea conditions are rough. Too bad this country hasn't progressed to having lifeguards on all public beaches during the daylight hours.
The rip currents are serious. The surfs up bruh crowd actually knows how to navigate. Since most of them are unemployed, maybe the Ayuntamiento can get them as volunteer life guards.
 

Caonabo

Silver
Sep 27, 2017
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The rip currents are serious. The surfs up bruh crowd actually knows how to navigate. Since most of them are unemployed, maybe the Ayuntamiento can get them as volunteer life guards.
This right here is an interesting concept. While absolutely 0 excuse for the government not to have these measures already in place for a nation surrounded by coastline (Defensa Civil and 911 is not equal), it piques my interest as to how no volunteer or auxiliary service as such has yet been developed by the expatriates themselves for the communities they reside in....especially amongst those of the surfing community.

Again, just kicking it around the pitch, and no excuse for the government not to have units as such already in place. Perhaps some person may be able to gain an ear with the new administration towards this life saving measure.
 

Chirimoya

Moderator - East Coast Forum
Dec 9, 2002
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On the east coast there is/was a training programme for lifeguards coordinated by the Canadian embassy. The surf school in Macao and several resorts took part.
 
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Big

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Apr 24, 2019
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Cab bay is relatively safe. The farther east you go towards the river the more dangerous. Likewise when going west of Cab bay ( twords Sosua) the surf can be very treacherous
 

AlterEgo

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Jan 9, 2009
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Playa Najayo & South Jersey
On the east coast there is/was a training programme for lifeguards coordinated by the Canadian embassy. The surf school in Macao and several resorts took part.
Doesn’t the Dominican Red Cross still train lifeguards? Many moons ago, Mr AE received certification from them, he worked as a lifeguard at the Hispaniola before getting into the casino business circa 1972. I remember seeing his framed diploma and one from PADI (he was a diver too) in his room.
He taught swimming in DR and here too. He knows rip currents well. He used to go swim at Guibia on the malecon, and more than once he was caught in one and ended up down by Vesuvio. The key, he says, is never fight it, just let it take you.
 

El Rey de Mangu

No peeky panee my love
Sep 22, 2009
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Doesn’t the Dominican Red Cross still train lifeguards? Many moons ago, Mr AE received certification from them, he worked as a lifeguard at the Hispaniola before getting into the casino business circa 1972. I remember seeing his framed diploma and one from PADI (he was a diver too) in his room.
He taught swimming in DR and here too. He knows rip currents well. He used to go swim at Guibia on the malecon, and more than once he was caught in one and ended up down by Vesuvio. The key, he says, is never fight it, just let it take you.
Eggs actly. Ride the current - stay calm. If you know how, swim perpendicular to the outflow
 
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John Boyter

Dom Rep - Denmark
Jun 10, 2008
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johnboyter.com
Doesn’t the Dominican Red Cross still train lifeguards? Many moons ago, Mr AE received certification from them, he worked as a lifeguard at the Hispaniola before getting into the casino business circa 1972. I remember seeing his framed diploma and one from PADI (he was a diver too) in his room.
He taught swimming in DR and here too. He knows rip currents well. He used to go swim at Guibia on the malecon, and more than once he was caught in one and ended up down by Vesuvio. The key, he says, is never fight it, just let it take you.
I have heard swim into the side of it. It then takes you but you eventually get out.
 
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Jan 9, 2004
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Doesn’t the Dominican Red Cross still train lifeguards? Many moons ago, Mr AE received certification from them, he worked as a lifeguard at the Hispaniola before getting into the casino business circa 1972. I remember seeing his framed diploma and one from PADI (he was a diver too) in his room.
He taught swimming in DR and here too. He knows rip currents well. He used to go swim at Guibia on the malecon, and more than once he was caught in one and ended up down by Vesuvio. The key, he says, is never fight it, just let it take you.
Rip currents, not to be confused with undertow, can be both violent and deadly. They are the number one ocean swimming hazard. Having spent ten summers as an ocean lifeguard and been subjected to one particularly violent Rip, they can humble the best and most powerful swimmers.

I had just finished a training exercise and was exhausted as I tried to exit the water. Hit by a large rogue wave and unable to take a breath and pretty much out of air I was caught in the Rip. As was already posted, the key is to do exactly the opposite of what your instincts tell you to do.........which would be to fight the Rip current.

Extend your arms, relax your body and just let it happen. You may be underwater for a period longer than you would like, but the key is to relax, holding your breath and counting slowly 1001, 1002 etc. Take your mind off of the situation as best you can.

Eventually the Rip stops and you can then proceed to swim sideways (parallel to shore) out of the Rip area.......and then back onto shore.

Of course it is not as easy as depicted but panicking is the surest way to drown in a Rip. You exhaust all your energy and more importantly.........all your air.


Respectfully,
Playacaribe2
 

El Rey de Mangu

No peeky panee my love
Sep 22, 2009
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Something like the ocean becoming dry?

What exactly can be done to protect everyone who dies swimming in dangerous areas? Putting up signs?
Cdn said something very fundemental. Why would you be so caustic? What is long overdo in these death beaches of Cab are some well trained lifeguards. Yes, btw, in all dangerous areas. I grew up in NJ on the water. Massive lifeguard system. Less deaths in 10 years there than 3 in Cab. Your viewpoints are baffling at times
 

cavok

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Jun 16, 2014
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Maybe when the government has enough money for adequate traffic police to reduce all the senseless deaths on the roads and highways here they'll get around to lifeguards to prevent drownings(?).
 
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NanSanPedro

Well-known member
Apr 12, 2019
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Maybe when the government has enough money for adequate traffic police to reduce all the senseless deaths on the roads and highways here they'll get around to lifeguards to prevent drownings(?).
$20 see they have enough $. It’s on who and how they choose to spend it.
 

GusFring

Active member
Apr 15, 2020
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Facebook post quotes from an alleged family member claiming something other than a drowning occurred.

Comments to the effect of, how did this happen, where were his friends, why was his body photographed on the beach like that.