Maps Showing The Growth of Santo Domingo

NALs

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Jan 20, 2003
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Today, Santo Domingo is the largest urban area in the Caribbean and one of the most extensive on an east-west direction in the Americas. This wasn't always the case, in fact its a recent creation. Similar to wood structures, which as recent as the 1980's and even beginning of the 1990's most homes were made of wood, one of the trends as Dominicans see an increase in their disposable income is to rebuild the original house or a new one in cinderblock and reinforced concrete; so too has the city grown. Now building houses of wood is rare. The rebar, cement, and cinderblock business appears to be very lucrative. Like in neighboring Puerto Rico, wooden homes are definitely becoming extinct despite they still make up the cultural image of the DR and is often used to show "Dominicaness" to tourists, including offering tours of wooden homes to show the visitor the "typical" lifestyle despite studies have shown that over 90% of Dominican houses are now cement and block.

The 1924 map is the closest to what Trujillo knew of Santo Domingo when he rose to power in 1930 and 1957 the closest when he was eliminated in 1961. Santo Domingo was considered to be one of the cleanest and safest capitals in Latin America, and was noted by urbanists and architects for taking into account beauty with an emphasis in Mid-Century Modern and Art Deco styles and greenery in applying the City Beautiful concept particularly in Gascue. After Trujillo's death and following much of the 1960's, Santo Domingo was subject to a free fall as people started flooding into the city and built what they wanted where ever they wanted, not taking into account a general urban planning that would had guaranteed wide roads, specific trees lining the sidewalks, underground wiring, etc. The migration pressure certainly took what was a relatively small, calm, clean, beautiful city and in a few decades turn it into a large, noisy, littered, traffic clogged mostly bland architecture sea of cement.

The maps are approximates, not exact representations. I say this because the Santo Domingo Country Club begins to appear on the map of 1965, yet it was the first golf course built in the Dominican Republic and it happen to be a project of the US Military in the 1920's. In fact, they left in 1924 and the golf course was already built and functioning by then. It should had been in the 1936 and 1957 maps too.

The yellow area in the 1957 map is of General Andrew Airport, the first international airport of Santo Domingo. There was an airplane accident that crashed into the Mejoramiento Social neighborhood. That was the moment Trujillo ordered a new airport to replace General Andrew Airport. The new one was built on the western shore of the Caucedo Peninsula and named "Trujillo Airport". After Trujillo's death the airport had a name change and became "Las Americas Airport".





 
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cj7

Newbie
Mar 12, 2017
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Wow, I can't believe what was supposed to be homework for urban studies in university has now been shared and projected for many other things. Anything lacking in this map is my own responsibility far back when I was a student in UNIBE studying architecture. I drew these maps with passion for the history hidden under "homework" but what I wanted to do beyond that is provide a platform so that future or upcoming engineers, urbanizers, and architects understand where do we come from and how have we ended up how it is right now and what can be done to solve it for the future.

It makes me very happy that my mapping documentation is of a useful resource for the critical and analytical thinking of people that care about what happens and moves on those streets.

Cheers!

Jose Calzada
 

JD Jones

Moderator - Covid 19 in DR & North Coast
Jan 7, 2016
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Wow, I can't believe what was supposed to be homework for urban studies in university has now been shared and projected for many other things. Anything lacking in this map is my own responsibility far back when I was a student in UNIBE studying architecture. I drew these maps with passion for the history hidden under "homework" but what I wanted to do beyond that is provide a platform so that future or upcoming engineers, urbanizers, and architects understand where do we come from and how have we ended up how it is right now and what can be done to solve it for the future.

It makes me very happy that my mapping documentation is of a useful resource for the critical and analytical thinking of people that care about what happens and moves on those streets.

Cheers!

Jose Calzada
Hey Jose, welcome aboard! Great job on the maps. I hope you stick around and add more posts in the future.
 

pularvik

Member
Jan 2, 2011
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Does anyone have a recent map of SD showing where the new highway goes. I am talking about the new highway that goes off to the right as you are driving from Samana to the Duarte highway. It would seem to bring you to the north of the city. Maybe someone has a better description of it or has driven on it and can give me more information. Thanks!
 

william webster

Platinum
Jan 16, 2009
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Search here for Santo Domingo Bypass

It starts at the toll road.... before the last toll..... and goes all the way to Haina
the other side of SD-- as I understand it

It's finished now....and in use

Seems to be true to its name - A bypass..... no exits in SD proper

I might be wrong about that
 

DonDimi

New member
Nov 28, 2016
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its called Circunvalacion Santo Domingo
use waze or google gps works great
 

TropicalPaul

Bronze
Sep 3, 2013
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Search here for Santo Domingo Bypass

It starts at the toll road.... before the last toll..... and goes all the way to Haina
the other side of SD-- as I understand it

It's finished now....and in use

Seems to be true to its name - A bypass..... no exits in SD proper

I might be wrong about that

It's not finished though is it? I thought there was one section left to build so that it intersects the highway at Caucedo near to Boca Chica. That will be the big game-changer.
 

JD Jones

Moderator - Covid 19 in DR & North Coast
Jan 7, 2016
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It's not finished though is it? I thought there was one section left to build so that it intersects the highway at Caucedo near to Boca Chica. That will be the big game-changer.

My trucks are using it so I think it is as finished as it's going to get. It's connects to the new highway to Samana.
 
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