Ministry of Education defends method to hire new teachers; graduates of teacher excellence program excluded

Dolores

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The Ministry of Education insists on excluding thousands that completed higher education programs from the competition to hire teachers for the 2021-2022 public school year. The students that are being left out had completed their studies but are missing the formality of graduation to get their titles. The 2021-2022 school year begins with in-person learning as of 20 September.



Diario Libre reports that the examination for the selection of 19,181 teachers and school principals begins on 8 September 2021 and excludes graduates of the Teachers of Excellence program that sought to raise the quality of public education. The Dominican Initiative for Quality Education (IDEC) has protested the Ministry of Education decision.



Education Minister Roberto Fulcar has insisted that the competition is not exclusive and that, therefore, “the graduates of this program have had...

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bob saunders

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This is always fun (not) for us. Many of our teachers take the exams and if they pass the government at some unknown time will contact them on a Friday and ask them to report on Monday to start working, leaving us to scramble for replacements. Only good thing is no severance pay and there is a surplus of teachers.
 

JD Jones

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Bob, have you seen any of the videos of the selection process that are being uploaded? What a disaster!
 

bob saunders

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Bob, have you seen any of the videos of the selection process that are being uploaded? What a disaster!
no, but we had four teachers go yesterday and more today to La Vega, Three have said they failed, one who is very intelligent and a very good teacher. As a former exam developer when I was teaching in the Canadian military Aircraft technology school when you have a higher than say 20 percent failure it can mean; the exam was too hard, the students learned the wrong information, the wording of the questions was ambiguous or confusing, or the students are simply poor students. It can certainly be a combination of all or several, but the 100 percent failure in San Juan points to other issues, mainly failures at the university level of instruction. The government would be better off having all its potential teachers taught by Japanese, Canadian or Spanish Educators and develop their education system around that of successful educations system like those.
 

Kipling333

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It is a total disgrace that many university students have finished their studies and are simply waiting for the universities to hand over their titles either in a real or virtual graduation ceremony ..Covid is getting the blame for everything.
 

bob saunders

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It is a total disgrace that many university students have finished their studies and are simply waiting for the universities to hand over their titles either in a real or virtual graduation ceremony ..Covid is getting the blame for everything.
Agrreed, several of our employees are going to graduations next week for diplomas from April and May.
 

Auryn

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no, but we had four teachers go yesterday and more today to La Vega, Three have said they failed, one who is very intelligent and a very good teacher. As a former exam developer when I was teaching in the Canadian military Aircraft technology school when you have a higher than say 20 percent failure it can mean; the exam was too hard, the students learned the wrong information, the wording of the questions was ambiguous or confusing, or the students are simply poor students. It can certainly be a combination of all or several, but the 100 percent failure in San Juan points to other issues, mainly failures at the university level of instruction. The government would be better off having all its potential teachers taught by Japanese, Canadian or Spanish Educators and develop their education system around that of successful educations system like those.
Japan scores quite high, but has become quite notorious for teaching to the tests that place them so high. The students can do the Math problem, but don’t necessarily understand the process or application.

So far Canada still does okay, but per pupil funding has decreased by $200-$500 per pupil, per year fairly steadily. This makes a huge difference for the quality of education in many schools that are understaffed already. Elementary classes aren’t regulated to be split until there are 35 students per room in my province, some are higher than that.

I don’t know about Spain, but even with the problems in Japan or Canada, I do think some initial outside help could get the ball rolling in the right direction.
 

bob saunders

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Japan scores quite high, but has become quite notorious for teaching to the tests that place them so high. The students can do the Math problem, but don’t necessarily understand the process or application.

So far Canada still does okay, but per pupil funding has decreased by $200-$500 per pupil, per year fairly steadily. This makes a huge difference for the quality of education in many schools that are understaffed already. Elementary classes aren’t regulated to be split until there are 35 students per room in my province, some are higher than that.

I don’t know about Spain, but even with the problems in Japan or Canada, I do think some initial outside help could get the ball rolling in the right direction.
In PISA scoring Japan was #4 and Canada #6, with Spain being the highest Spanish speaking country at 34, I believe. Every province in Canada is different with funding level different as well.
 
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bob saunders

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Japan scores quite high, but has become quite notorious for teaching to the tests that place them so high. The students can do the Math problem, but don’t necessarily understand the process or application.

So far Canada still does okay, but per pupil funding has decreased by $200-$500 per pupil, per year fairly steadily. This makes a huge difference for the quality of education in many schools that are understaffed already. Elementary classes aren’t regulated to be split until there are 35 students per room in my province, some are higher than that.

I don’t know about Spain, but even with the problems in Japan or Canada, I do think some initial outside help could get the ball rolling in the right direction.
While looking for something else I found this interesting article. https://www.heritage.org/education/report/the-myth-racial-disparities-public-school-funding It is off topic so not a subject for discussion. I believe school funding is close to adequate for the DR if the funding is allocated better. The real problem is the quality of the teaching and the method used. Also because teaching is one of the better paid jobs within government in the DR and requiring as little as two years of education, many of those that become teachers have no real interest in teaching and it isn't a vocation for them, simply a pay cheque with a government pension.
 
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bob saunders

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Japan scores quite high, but has become quite notorious for teaching to the tests that place them so high. The students can do the Math problem, but don’t necessarily understand the process or application.

So far Canada still does okay, but per pupil funding has decreased by $200-$500 per pupil, per year fairly steadily. This makes a huge difference for the quality of education in many schools that are understaffed already. Elementary classes aren’t regulated to be split until there are 35 students per room in my province, some are higher than that.

I don’t know about Spain, but even with the problems in Japan or Canada, I do think some initial outside help could get the ball rolling in the right direction.\
 

Auryn

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While looking for something else I found this interesting article. https://www.heritage.org/education/report/the-myth-racial-disparities-public-school-funding It is off topic so not a subject for discussion. I believe school funding is close to adequate for the DR if the funding is allocated better. The real problem is the quality of the teaching and the method used. Also because teaching is one of the better paid jobs within government in the DR and requiring as little as two years of education, many of those that become teachers have no real interest in teaching and it isn't a vocation for them, simply a pay cheque with a government pension.
By funding, I mean providing teachers with methodology classes and access to professional development. Providing access to something as simple as a basic photocopier could free up time for teachers to access PD or spend their time more efficiently.

I mean spending the money on public campaigns about the value of education, not throwing garbage on the corner, and teaching parents who can’t read.

While I did take the time to read your article Bob, I cannot say that I agree. First of all, it focuses on racial inequalities in the US between white, Hispanic, Asian, and black students. It does not provide data from any other countries.

The comparison is flawed. In a poor district where kids go to school without food, a huge part of the budget might go to a breakfast and/or lunch program as opposed to a Science lab. When kids don’t eat, they don’t learn. So a trade off happens that isn’t always properly addressed in public education studies.

It also doesn’t consider the fact hiw allocation of funding is often a problem. As an example, the Canadian province of Alberta has a special organization for all of its school division superintendents called CASS (College of Alberta School Superintendents) This creates a top heavy, bureaucratic system that serves no real necessary purpose besides more money in the pockets of those officials. So, we have superintendants making 6 figures already receiving public education funding for their little club. Other provinces function just as well without such organizations specifically for their superintendants.

My point is: Public education funding can appear to be properly allocated when it’s spent on nonsense. In the big picture it looks to be nicely wrapped up in a bow with whatever percentage spent nationally. But that money ends up funding a school superintendents trip to Miami for a conference rather than fixing the taps in the girls bathroom in Pedro Brand (Or Calgary for that matter).
 
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Auryn

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Here is a website that provides a broad range of global education data. You can select which countries to learn about, access historical data, and compare public education funding.

Our World in Data

And from that website, a comparison between PISA scores and education funding. Note that the DR is not even on the chart.

PISA Scores vs Education Funding

It does state that high scores do not always correlate with high spending, but lower scores tend to correlate with lower spending.