Murderers, drug dealers, rapists returned to DR

Funnyyale26

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With so many people in jail in the DR, why doesn't the government implement a program of reforestation so that they can be employed doing something positive for the nation? or maybe like fixing the roads?
 

Eddy

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Why does the DR government not put in place a program to help these repatriates once they are back in the country.
Suggestion: Pick them up at the airport in a truck. Drive them to a secluded spot. Toss them off a cliff and feed the sharks. When word of that gets out, believe me no one will want to get deported back. Will lower crime rate both in the USA and DR considerably.
 

Chip

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In response to Canbon's question about a deportee Dominican being able to return to the US, the answer is when Colon baje el dedo. By far the majority of normal, law abiding Dominican's cannot get a tourist visa to the US, much less a permanent resident type.

Also, I am aware of a few apparent deportees here in Santiago that I have come across, which are typically recognized by their clothes, way of speaking, mannerisms, tatoos etc. There are actually a couple of guys at my gym who seem to fit this description, they think the f-bomb is sophisticated (they prefer to speak a gutter form of English)and have tons of tatoos but otherwise seem civil. Also, they are typically a lot less open and friendly than typical Dominicans, even some being downright rude. Ex, if someone here in Cibao greets a stranger with a "buenas tardes" if one doesn't respond it is seen as offensive - I did this to one guy who I thought was crillo but he just ignored me but after closer inspection I realized he was just another tiguere from nuevaiyoi.
 

Kyle

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With so many people in jail in the DR, why doesn't the government implement a program of reforestation so that they can be employed doing something positive for the nation? or maybe like fixing the roads?
i use to lobby for sending our US prisoners to Iraq to fight....:chinese: maybe they could have the DR prisoners repair all the storm damage every year....
 

suarezn

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Why does the DR government not put in place a program to help these repatriates once they are back in the country. They should have a system, where they must enter a halfway house type facility, make them work on chain gangs, and do regular drug testing etc., help them integrate back into society with work placement programs until they can show they are back on the straight and narrow. I would think this would be less costly in the long run compared to trying to combat their crimes, possibly incarcerating them, trials etc. after they are just let loose to do whatever with nothing to support them but their old bad habits.

It is frustrating to sit back and watch this country and its politicians let this country become so crime ridden.


Or am I
Hmmm...interesting thought (NOT). Since they didn't commit any crime in The DR AND they did serve their full sentence in The US before they were deported what do you suggest they hold them for?

This is a topic full of misinformation and yet another one of those where you have plenty of people commenting about something they only know from hearsay.

I (who happen to know quite a bunch of these deportees...just because we're from the same small town or grew up together) know that things are different than painted on the media. In addition if you think these guys don't go back to The US you're very mistaken...lots of them do (of course running a big risk that if they are caught again they will be imprisoned for just being there illegally.

BTW, the new place lots of them are migrating to now is Spain.
 

Chip

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Hmmm...interesting thought (NOT). Since they didn't commit any crime in The DR AND they did serve their full sentence in The US before they were deported what do you suggest they hold them for?

This is a topic full of misinformation and yet another one of those where you have plenty of people commenting about something they only know from hearsay.

I (who happen to know quite a bunch of these deportees...just because we're from the same small town or grew up together) know that things are different than painted on the media. In addition if you think these guys don't go back to The US you're very mistaken...lots of them do (of course running a big risk that if they are caught again they will be imprisoned for just being there illegally.

BTW, the new place lots of them are migrating to now is Spain.
Suarez, I don't think anybody is saying that they won't or can't go back to the States or Canada, or whever, just that they won't go back legally - there is a very big difference between the two.
 

LatinoRican

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As someone mentioned, these returned convicts (men and women) have served their time in U.S. prisons. They can not be held accountable in the D.R., so the local authorities send them on their way home to wherever they are from. Once in their hometown, they can not find jobs because of their criminal background. Some may try to head back to the U.S., but others soon decide that to put to use what they learned on the streets and prisons in the U.S. This may be happening in other countries too, but since DR1 is about the Dominican Republic, I have limited my comments to what concerns us. No wonder so many law abiding citizens on this board are already armed or asking how to arm themselves for whatever may come their way!
 

marliejaneca

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Sorry, suarzen, that my thoughts are not interesting to you - and yes - I don't know anything and (thankfully) do not know any deportees.

A Hildago - sorry I did not realize how many threads were already out there on this very topic. I promise from now on that I will do a search on any subject that is posted and if there is (hmm, what would you say 2 or more in the last 5 years), I will make sure not to participate, since then it will have been discussed "ad nauseum:!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Marlie:ermm:
 

amparocorp

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last time i got sentenced for first degree murder they sentenced me to life in prison and then i will be deported to my native afranistan. my buddy copped a plea deal to second degree murder and he got 25 to life and then he will be deported. rape these days can get you an easy 20, anything with a gun and you are gonna get some serious time. most of the deportees are young men who have served short sentences for drug crimes. they are not men in their 40's or 50's who have served 20+ years for murder. i'm not calling them a bunch of choir boys, nor defending them for past actions, my point is "the sky is not falling" and jack the ripper, boston strangler, ted bundy types are not the majority of deportees. most are young men who sought to make the almighty dollar the easy way, dealing drugs, theft.
and, you don't have to be a felon to be deported either. this past december 1st, 2007, early in the AM, agents from US immigration made a sweep of the greyhound bus station in albany, NY. they got a full load to deport. farming operations in upstate NY end in october-november, so what they got was a bunch of mexican farm workers who already had bus tickets to ........"drum roll".....................texas, where they get the bus back to mexico!!!!!!!!!!.....thank you for picking the apples, now we will put you in a US jail for a month or two, feed you 3 square and provide medical attention, confiscate your luggage and send you back to mexico!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!.........your tax dollars at work...............the inmates are now running the asylum.............
 

LatinoRican

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Sorry if I have ruffled some feathers by posting on the topic of the latest 118 convicted felons being returned to DR. My last comment is that these men are not farm workers being deported because they did not have an appropriate work visa. According to the Listin Diario, they were found guilty of murder, drug trafficking, rape, arson, fraud, and kidnapping among other crimes. The fact that most of them are young men, according to a previous poster, only means that they may have a long life of delinquency ahead of them. But who wants to listen to bad news? Let's have more posts about how to arm ourselves and where to buy razor wire to protect our homes instead. Those topics are much more entertaining, don't you think? Enough said.
 
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Lambada

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www.ginniebedggood.com
For those asking about prison 'after-care' programmes for deportees: after-care is only just being introduced in this country for its own ex-prisoners i.e. Casa Redentor. After care is in the remit of the Escuela Nacional Penitenciaria of the Procuraduria General:
:: Escuela Nacional Penitenciaria ::

Info on Casa Redentor here:
La Informaci?n Online | Rep?blica Dominicana

El Nacional, la voz de todos

http://www.procuraduria.gov.do/Novedades/PGR-44.doc

My guess is once a programme is well established for DR ex-prisoners then they will be able to focus on deportees. At present there are some efforts by voluntary/church groups for deportees but nothing on the Casa Redentor lines. Currently there are 7 facilities operating on the Casa Redentor model in different parts of the country. There are also separate facilities for adolescents like this one:
La Informaci?n Online | Rep?blica Dominicana

It is happening, slowly, but it IS happening.
 

A.Hidalgo

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The OP and others don't care about these rehabilitation programs. They prefer for these folks to be eliminated or vanished into thin air. Good info Lambada.
 
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suarezn

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Sorry if I have ruffled some feathers by posting on the topic of the latest 118 convicted felons being returned to DR. My last comment is that these men are not farm workers being deported because they did not have an appropriate work visa. According to the Listin Diario, they were found guilty of murder, drug trafficking, rape, arson, fraud, and kidnapping among other crimes. The fact that most of them are young men, according to a previous poster, only means that they may have a long life of delinquency ahead of them. But who wants to listen to bad news? Let's have more posts about how to arm ourselves and where to buy razor wire to protect our homes instead. Those topics are much more entertaining, don't you think? Enough said.
You haven't ruffled anyone's feathers (at least not mine). Like I said earlier this has been discussed and rehashed many times over...and like I said earlier you're just talking from hearsay and really have no clue about these deportees.
 

Fernandez

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Jan 4, 2002
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The worst possible alternative for a hard core Dominican criminal who served time in the States is to return to the Dominican Republic. They are much better protected in US jails, and the risk of their having "sung" to USA authorities makes them quite a local risk- many don't live past the year.