Next minister of Interior & Police says government will apply the law

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Dolores

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Jesús (Chú) Vásquez, the named Minister of Interior & Police in the upcoming Luis Abinader presidency, says the next government will apply the General Migration Law 285-04. He said the law was passed when he presided the Senate in 2004. “Nothing needs to be invented. Just apply the law,” he says. He says Juan Manuel Rosario, who consulted on the law back then, would work with him as Deputy Minister of Interior & Police, responsible for the migratory matters.



Vásquez says that the migration issues worsened because of the delays in the government passing the ruling to apply the law. He said during those limbo years, many more people migrated here. He says there also has not been the political will to confront the situation.



The named Interior & Police minister has been senator for María Trinidad Sánchez province from 1994 to 2010. He was the provincial governor...
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windeguy

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I will believe that when I see the overstay "fees" go away.

There are two types of people according to the law. Those who are legal and those who are not legal.
Those who over stay are not legal.

Let us see if he walks the walk.
 

user123

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I will believe that when I see the overstay "fees" go away.

There are two types of people according to the law. Those who are legal and those who are not legal.
Those who over stay are not legal.

Let us see if he walks the walk.
What's your resentment toward the over-stayers? Why do you care if I'm legal or not? I'd rather pay the "fee" whenever I decide to leave the country than go thru the process of getting the residency. Plus I'm not here taking jobs from the locals, if anything I pump at least 3-4K a month into the economy and the government has no responsibility towards me at all. Sincerely yours, NOT LEGAL 😁 😁
 

windeguy

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What's your resentment toward the over-stayers? Why do you care if I'm legal or not? I'd rather pay the "fee" whenever I decide to leave the country than go thru the process of getting the residency. Plus I'm not here taking jobs from the locals, if anything I pump at least 3-4K a month into the economy and the government has no responsibility towards me at all. Sincerely yours, NOT LEGAL 😁 😁
Where do I state anything other than facts? Where do I show anything other than information? Where I do I state any opinion?

Where did I state it has anything to do with you? But if the shoe fits...

If the law is actually enforced, that overstay fee will disappear. Is that a slight against you from me?

If you prefer to be illegal, that is entirely up to you.
 
Sep 22, 2009
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What's your resentment toward the over-stayers? Why do you care if I'm legal or not? I'd rather pay the "fee" whenever I decide to leave the country than go thru the process of getting the residency. Plus I'm not here taking jobs from the locals, if anything I pump at least 3-4K a month into the economy and the government has no responsibility towards me at all. Sincerely yours, NOT LEGAL 😁 😁
I personally had a work permit before naturalization. I don't see any issue with overstay. User123 is correct folks like him bring income, employ informal workers (domestic, motoconcho, electricians, colmados, etc). The only thing I have seen is a person's assets were frozen here on the ground and eventually lost an expensive auto. If you rent a furnished place and respect the culture and the people while contributing to the economy, God bless! Unfortunately many folks are also living clandestine lives and many times create problems. To each his own I say!
 
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John Boyter

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What's your resentment toward the over-stayers? Why do you care if I'm legal or not? I'd rather pay the "fee" whenever I decide to leave the country than go thru the process of getting the residency. Plus I'm not here taking jobs from the locals, if anything I pump at least 3-4K a month into the economy and the government has no responsibility towards me at all. Sincerely yours, NOT LEGAL 😁 😁
I don’t think you are really illegal when the government accepts it and immigration just charges you the overstay fee. Has any lawyer here on this forum claimed it was illegal?
 

windeguy

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I personally had a work permit before naturalization. I don't see any issue with overstay. User123 is correct folks like him bring income, employ informal workers (domestic, motoconcho, electricians, colmados, etc). The only thing I have seen is a person's assets were frozen here on the ground and eventually lost an expensive auto. If you rent a furnished place and respect the culture and the people while contributing to the economy, God bless! Unfortunately many folks are also living clandestine lives and many times create problems. To each his own I say!
Everyone will do what they wish and live with the consequences. Knowing what those consequences could be is important to some an insignificant to others.
 

windeguy

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You are not really illegal when the government accepts it and immigration just charges you the overstay fee.
You are 100% wrong on this. The overstay fee does not make your overstay legal. DR1's lawyer has confirmed this in other threads.
The entire reason for the new minister to say he will enforce the laws is because the overstay fee is a work around
that ignores immigration laws that the PRM wrote in 2004 just before 16 years of PLD rule which ends in about a week.

Here is the link about this work around of paying fees:


Note B under the fees is this:

b. Este pago no supone una prorroga que autorice al nacional extranjero a permanecer en el país.
Translated by Google
b. This payment (of the overstay fee) does not imply an extension that authorizes the foreign national to remain in the country.

(Payment of the overstay fee does not mean your overstay was legal)
 
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John Boyter

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You are 100% wrong on this. The overstay fee does not make your overstay legal. DR1's lawyer has confirmed this in other threads.
The entire reason for the new minister to say he will enforce the laws is because the overstay fee is a work around
that ignores immigration laws that the PRM wrote in 2004 just before 16 years of PLD rule which ends in about a week.

Here is the link about this work around of paying fees:


Note B under the fees is this:

b. Este pago no supone una prorroga que autorice al nacional extranjero a permanecer en el país.
Translated by Google
b. This payment (of the overstay fee) does not imply an extension that authorizes the foreign national to remain in the country.

(Payment of the overstay fee does not mean your overstay was legal)
I just don’t like calling something illegal when its not enforced and as pointed out many contribute to the economy. I also wish they would find a better solution both the ones overstaying snd Dominican immigration.
 

windeguy

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I just don’t like calling something illegal when its not enforced and as pointed out many contribute to the economy. I also wish they would find a better solution both the ones overstaying snd Dominican immigration.
It is illegal.

There are two types of people in the DR, those who are here legally with residency, some type of valid visa or naturalization, and those who enter and remain illegally like those over 30 days on a tourist card.

What we like is not important, what is important is the law and if it is enforced or not. The law has not been enforced. Will the law be enforced according to what the new minister says? Who knows.

What I don't like is that there is no easily attainable snowbird visa that can allow people to stay legally for up to 6 months without issue. The government does not seem to care about the fact I don't like this.
 

CristoRey

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Correct me if I'm wrong but didn't they round up a bunch of
tourist/ overstayers a few years ago? I also recall the Minister
of Tourism issuing an apology to those who were caught up
in that fiasco.
 

windeguy

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Correct me if I'm wrong but didn't they round up a bunch of
tourist/ overstayers a few years ago? I also recall the Minister
of Tourism issuing an apology to those who were caught up
in that fiasco.
Yes. That was the PLD minister at the time. The PRM takes charge in just over a week.

If the law is enforced, that could certainly happen again.
 

CristoRey

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Yes. That was the PLD minister at the time. The PRM takes charge in just over a week.

If the law is enforced, that could certainly happen again.
Interesting.
Of the 30+ gringos I know who live in the DR year round.
None of them have residency.
 
Sep 22, 2009
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Correct me if I'm wrong but didn't they round up a bunch of
tourist/ overstayers a few years ago? I also recall the Minister
of Tourism issuing an apology to those who were caught up
in that fiasco.
Wasn't that Sosua. Wasn't that part of some sting and hustle operation. A particular business owner on Clisante
 
Sep 22, 2009
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Sosua and Cabarete. It was not a particular business.
I remember there being gringos who had been involved with criminal activity. Anyway it always just seems the paddy wagon only ever had Hatians aboard. Maybe this warning from the new administration means they will be cracking down. Maybe it just means more shakedowns. Time will tell

Oh, now I recall a certain female business owner in Sosua who was scooped up in the operative. The next day she was back at her business. My facts may be fuzzy here though, confusing 2 distinct events
 

MikeFisher

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during the long PLD years the existing law was only enforced when carrying away bus loads of haitians
and when such foreigner of other than haitian nationality did come into some kinda conflict with the law here.
they couldn't clearly or easy proof your guilt, you just get taken in for beeing a illegal Immigrant(and that you def are starting from day 31 on a tourist visa),
so they could take you in for just that and if not cooperating the way they want, sit you on a plane back home on your cost/your home country's cost.
in general, the PLD did use the law solely to "control" the number of illegal Haitians in the DR.
 

windeguy

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I don’t think you are really illegal when the government accepts it and immigration just charges you the overstay fee. Has any lawyer here on this forum claimed it was illegal?
1) Yes DR1's own lawyer explained that the paying of the overstay fee does not mean you were legal. The overstay fee is an administrative work around as it was explained.

2) It is also stated on the Migracion web site that paying the overstay fee does not make your stay legal.

3) And the initial post in this thread is about finally enforcing immigration laws as written.

Coincidences? Not at all.

What happened in the past is what might be overcome by actually enforcing the laws as written if the new minister is to be believed.
 
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