Not for the Apple folks: Have any of you been infected?

Hillbilly

Moderator
Jan 1, 2002
18,946
501
113
There is a new worm going around, taking advantage of a opening in Microsoft's product. Apparently a patch was sent out but it still seems to be spreading.

I guess care, firewalls, good virus protection and common sense are surely needed in this case.

Of course a mass exodus to Apple would solve it altogether, but what is amazing is the sophistication of the new worm is supposedly very high.

HB, techie idiot
 

AnnaC

Gold
Jan 2, 2002
16,050
410
83
Do you know what the virus is called or what the email comes in as? Was it an email?

I don't open attachments anymore unless I know that someone is sending me something specific ahead of time and it's not a general forward. I got tired of emails telling to me to forward this to 25 friends or I would die by the end of the day or something like that. :laugh:
 

heldengebroed

Bronze
Mar 9, 2005
560
6
0
i ve been infected
it came as a picture in msn

msn and chat function halted

81 files infected

had to take out the hard disk and connect it to an old pc stacked with anti virus programs

greetings

johan
 

TheHun

New member
May 4, 2008
448
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0
I use mac and I did not have any virus yet. I have a virus scan just in case thought.
Once you go Mac, never go back! ;)

TheHun
 

DRob

Gold
Aug 15, 2007
8,189
509
113
I agree that Apple makes great products (it's the mentality of the company I very much dislike), but when I can get a laptop with 2 GB of memory, a dual core processor, 250 GB HD and DVD Writer for under $700 US new, it is very hard to purchase a product from Apple with equivalent hardware for more than double the price. (Apple used to have an edge in processor hardware, but now they use Intel processors like PCs).

I will stick with PCs, perhaps one day going with a Linux OS. Practically speaking, many people could already use Linux for what they need to do with a computer and not have to pay royalties to Microsoft or Apple.
[Full Disclosure: After almost two decades of constant PC use, I became a very satisfied Mac user/customer in May 2008. In addition to being my personal computer at home, it is also the plaform for my business, with three laptops, one desktop, a router/backup device, and a variety of software.]

Windy,

It is true there is no practical Mac product out there priced under $999, but it is equally true that the Mac is a vastly better computer. Several tests have been run and it was determined that a similarly equipped Mac runs PC applications better than most PCs. This is because DOS, the underlying program for Windows, is a relatively inefficient program that can only execute one task at a time.

On the other hand, OS, the Mac system, is UNIX-based. That's just a fancy way of saying it's designed to multitask, and can therefore perform the same functions as a PC in less time.

I've experienced one crash since buying a Mac. On my old virus-free PC system, it happened at least once a week. It was slower, would portal into remote access sites in it's own sweet time, ran many programs at a crawl, would start to misbehave if jiggled in the slightest, sometimes had wireless, sometimes not so much, and was otherwise quite a bit of work from this piece of work.

The Mac, on the other hand, is actually fun to use and is not plagued by any of those issues (mind you, I look at computers as tools to enhance work and communications, not as entertainment unto themselves.)

We also know the Mac is less prone to viruses, namely because any malevolent-minded idiot can learn to program in DOS in about an hour, whereas UNIX is far more challenging to program in and overcome. For example, DOS will open just about anything it sees that hits it's system. OS, on the other hand, opens nothing without permission first. No surprises. No malware. No drama.

So yeah, the barebones Mac costs less than a barebones PC. But you get what you pay for.

Finish with a little story: I go into Best Buy, a large NA electronics chain, to talk to a guy about computers. I'm in the middle of the PC section, talking to the salesman about my needs. While I'm looking at a high-end laptop, I ask him what computer he thinks would be best for the money for my needs. "Honestly," he says, "I'd walk over there," pointing at the Mac booth.

A most pleasant stroll, indeed.:chinese::chinese::chinese:

DRob :glasses:
 

Fishguy

New member
Oct 22, 2006
54
12
0
The spread of Conficker just shows how many people have a lax attitude towards computer security. The patch to avoid this was released over 3 months ago: Microsoft Security Bulletin MS08-067

If automatic updates are off (my personal preference), then update regularly.
 

ExtremeR

Silver
Mar 22, 2006
3,078
320
0
[Full Disclosure: After almost two decades of constant PC use, I became a very satisfied Mac user/customer in May 2008. In addition to being my personal computer at home, it is also the plaform for my business, with three laptops, one desktop, a router/backup device, and a variety of software.]

Windy,

It is true there is no practical Mac product out there priced under $999, but it is equally true that the Mac is a vastly better computer. Several tests have been run and it was determined that a similarly equipped Mac runs PC applications better than most PCs. This is because DOS, the underlying program for Windows, is a relatively inefficient program that can only execute one task at a time.

On the other hand, OS, the Mac system, is UNIX-based. That's just a fancy way of saying it's designed to multitask, and can therefore perform the same functions as a PC in less time.

I've experienced one crash since buying a Mac. On my old virus-free PC system, it happened at least once a week. It was slower, would portal into remote access sites in it's own sweet time, ran many programs at a crawl, would start to misbehave if jiggled in the slightest, sometimes had wireless, sometimes not so much, and was otherwise quite a bit of work from this piece of work.

The Mac, on the other hand, is actually fun to use and is not plagued by any of those issues (mind you, I look at computers as tools to enhance work and communications, not as entertainment unto themselves.)

We also know the Mac is less prone to viruses, namely because any malevolent-minded idiot can learn to program in DOS in about an hour, whereas UNIX is far more challenging to program in and overcome. For example, DOS will open just about anything it sees that hits it's system. OS, on the other hand, opens nothing without permission first. No surprises. No malware. No drama.

So yeah, the barebones Mac costs less than a barebones PC. But you get what you pay for.

Finish with a little story: I go into Best Buy, a large NA electronics chain, to talk to a guy about computers. I'm in the middle of the PC section, talking to the salesman about my needs. While I'm looking at a high-end laptop, I ask him what computer he thinks would be best for the money for my needs. "Honestly," he says, "I'd walk over there," pointing at the Mac booth.

A most pleasant stroll, indeed.:chinese::chinese::chinese:

DRob :glasses:
That is so misleading, Windows platform stopped using DOS as a base with Windows Millenium, from then Windows 2000, Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 all use NT as their base and have a built in command promt to execute in a custom manner some applications, If you want a Windows platform very efficient get the 64-bit version of the latests windows (starting with XP).
 
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margaret

Bronze
Aug 9, 2006
1,219
90
48
Do you know what the virus is called or what the email comes in as? Was it an email?

I don't open attachments anymore unless I know that someone is sending me something specific ahead of time and it's not a general forward. I got tired of emails telling to me to forward this to 25 friends or I would die by the end of the day or something like that. :laugh:
I received two emails today from a friend in the DR to my Hotmail account.

It's looks like an image file with a .gif extension but when you click on the hyperlink you see it's an .exe file! Apparently this malware sends and email to all the Hotmail contacts with the executable file, once you're infected.

receiving spam worm trojan from a friends Hotmail account - Windows Live Help
 

Ladybird

Bronze
Dec 15, 2003
1,768
24
38
dreamteamdownloads1.com
Many dangerous malware around just now

Conficker Worm Spikes, Infects 1.1 Million PCs In Less Than 24 Hours

It has been over a month since we heard much about Conficker, but the worm has reappeared with a vengeance over the past seven days. According to Finnish security company F-Secure, more than one million PCs have been infected with the worm (also known as Kido or Downadup) in the past 24 hours, with a total of 3.52 million machines infected worldwide. According to F-Secure, that 3.52 million is a conservative estimate.

The problem isn't so much with the older version of Conficker (now known as Conficker.A) but with a new flavor, dubbed Conficker.B. Ars spoke with Roger Halbheer, Chief Security Advisor of Microsoft's EMEA (Europe, Middle East, and Africa); he's been monitoring (and writing) about the current spread of infections. The skyrocketing infection rate is actually being caused by several factors; Roger describes Conficker.B as a "beast," and Microsoft has built a diagram to demonstrate how the worm functions.

Once run or given access to an unprotected machine, Conficker.B begins searching for other systems or shares within the local network that it can infect. Shared systems, removable drives, or unpatched systems are all eligible targets, as are machines with weak passwords. This last bit is an important new feature of Conficker.B; a complete list of the passwords it checks for can be found here. If Conficker.B manages to successfully guess a password, it moves in and continues hunting for new targets. Microsoft summarizes the new strain as follows:

Worm:Win32/Conficker.B is a worm that infects other computers across a network by exploiting a vulnerability in the Windows Server service (SVCHOST.EXE). If the vulnerability is successfully exploited, it could allow remote code execution when file sharing is enabled. It may also spread via removable drives and weak administrator passwords. It disables several important system services and security products.

Roger confirmed that the Malicious Software Removal Tool (MSRT) has checked for and removed Conficker.B since December 29, 2008, but it's not possible to access any Microsoft website once Conficker.B has infected a system; the worm blocks access to multiple domains based on string identification. If you've got a system that's infected, you'll need to download the latest MSRT from Microsoft on a clean system and run it manually.

Not all AV scanners currently detect Conficker.B, even if they've been updated to detect Conficker.A?I don't have a list of specific solutions that can't currently catch the new worm, but all of Microsoft's antimalware/antivirus products?Forefront, OneCare, and the Online Safety Scanner?will find Conficker.B if it's present (and you somehow haven't noticed). If there's a scrap of good news in all this, it's that Conficker.B is not a subtle worm.

Roger has provided some additional coverage on the worm that may be useful. First and foremost, he recommends installing MS08-067?this will not remove an existing infection, but it will guard against attack from either version of the agent, provided you aren't using weak passwords.
When Conficker.A first appeared, we raised the question of whether or not Microsoft should force updates in certain situations, and what those situations might be. In this case, even unilaterally enforced updates wouldn't solve the problem of weak passwords, but it would have undoubtedly cut the number of new infections we are seeing today. The size of that reduction would be the point on which the value of forced updates would turn, and of course, that's the one thing we can't predict; there are holes in existing AV products that would allow Conficker.B through, and the worm will attack and infect machines using weak passwords. Depending on how you view the situation; this second strain could reinforce the need for mandatory updates or blow a whole in the argument.

Part of the reason for the problem, however, must inevitably come back upon the users, IT administrators, or managers that opted not to install the patch. As Roger writes: "If you decide not to roll out a security update which is so critical that we decide to go out of band, you play Russian Roulette with your network...The same is actually true if you do not run and maintain an appropriate Anti-Malware solution...Now, if we look at Conficker.B: This is really an ugly beast: You need just one infected machine in your network in order to have it spread across your network fast and aggressively. You can get it even through a USB-stick...it just needs one unpatched/infected machine."

Indeed. Based on the characteristics of a worm such as this, even mandatory updates would only be one facet of prevention.

I managed to clear down and out this beast through the Malware Protection Centre.
Malware Protection Center - Entry: Worm:Win32/Alcan.D

This is what it picked up:

Worm:Win32/Alcan.D is a worm that spreads via peer-to-peer (P2P) file sharing networks. Worm:Win32/Alcan.D downloads and runs files from remote websites and may interfere with security software installed on the system.

Backdoor:Win32/RBot
Win32/IRCBot.worm.variant (AhnLab)
W32/Ircbot.1!Generic (Authentium (Command))
Win32/Rbot!generic (CA)
Win32/Rbot.Y (ESET)
Backdoor.Win32.Rbot.gen (Kaspersky)
W32/Sdbot.worm.gen.g (McAfee)
W32/Spybot.BPUM (Norman)
W32/Rbot-GR (Sophos)
W32.Spybot.Worm (Symantec)
WORM_SPYBOT.GEN (Trend Micro)

AVG did not detect/block any of it

Some more help here;
StopBadware.org - How can I get rid of badware?

However, there is a much more dangerous virus spreading throughout the world right now - Antivirus - it appears from any site warning that your computer has been infected and click a button to detect and clear. It is presented on the normal WINDOWS format with the Windows emblem. DO NOT be tempted. If you click on any button on that warning sign, it immediately downloads onto every part of your PC and clings. You cant clear it completely even with Microsofts help or AVG etc. You think you have cleared it but its STILL there. There is only one way - Kasperskys, the best in the world. It not only found the remains on my laptop of that brute, it cleared out sites that had it and cleaned up my laptop. The difference was VERY noticeable in both speed and performance. I highly recommend it and you can have a 30 free trial. It is very expensive but it is worth it, you get what you pay for and these days there is so much Malware out there, your norm antivirus.spyware detectors wont pick them all up. I only got it because I was working and I had so much to do, I was using my laptop and my SuperMACBook at the same time for referrals.

Once you have a MAC - you never go back!!!!!!!!!!!

Windeguy you are incorrect about pricing. I bought my nearly new Macbook for $800. There are also lots of reconditionned ones for sale from Apple,
(Get better soon Steve)

Take care of your equipment. All these Malware about just now are very sophisticated.

Good luck