NY pizza in Santiago

Chip

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Jul 25, 2007
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Santiago
Granted I've never been to the Big Apple but have eaten NY style pizza is Orlando and can say Santiago now has authentic NY pizza. A friend of the owner told me about it and apparently the guy had a restaurant in NY. It's called Monchi's and is next to Institute JFK on JP duarte. It's RD500 for a big one and you won't be disappointed.
 

mike l

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Sep 4, 2007
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Granted I've never been to the Big Apple but have eaten NY style pizza is Orlando and can say Santiago now has authentic NY pizza. A friend of the owner told me about it and apparently the guy had a restaurant in NY. It's called Monchi's and is next to Institute JFK on JP duarte. It's RD500 for a big one and you won't be disappointed.

Let's hope so but what makes NY pizza unique is the water that is used in the dough as NY has some of the purest drinking water you can get
 
May 29, 2006
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Chip, do you know what kind of oven they are using? The conveyor ones are starting to take over now because they are much easier, but they are very pricey.

Let's hope so but what makes NY pizza unique is the water that is used in the dough as NY has some of the purest drinking water you can get

I dunno. I've made NYC style pizza professionally and what matters is the ingredients, the equipment, the technique, and prob most importantly, the flour, which in NYC is most commonly Gold Medal ALL TRUMPS, a high gluten flour with malted barley in it. The malted barley adds a beer flavor to the crust and also helps to keep the yeast lively. Water just isn't that big of a factor, though it makes a good story.

You need a stone deck oven, not a cheap steel deck oven as in most of the DR. Any pizza cooked on a greased baking pan or on a steel deck isn't going to have a proper NYC crust with the "leoparding" or slight char that adds flavor. The stone deck ovens absorb the steam from the bottom of the crust, but a steel deck can't because it's not porous. No stone deck, and it just isn't going to be a NYC crust.

Let's hope the new guy Santiago can raise the bar...
 

the gorgon

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Sep 16, 2010
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Chip, do you know what kind of oven they are using? The conveyor ones are starting to take over now because they are much easier, but they are very pricey.



I dunno. I've made NYC style pizza professionally and what matters is the ingredients, the equipment, the technique, and prob most importantly, the flour, which in NYC is most commonly Gold Medal ALL TRUMPS, a high gluten flour with malted barley in it. The malted barley adds a beer flavor to the crust and also helps to keep the yeast lively. Water just isn't that big of a factor, though it makes a good story.

You need a stone deck oven, not a cheap steel deck oven as in most of the DR. Any pizza cooked on a greased baking pan or on a steel deck isn't going to have a proper NYC crust with the "leoparding" or slight char that adds flavor. The stone deck ovens absorb the steam from the bottom of the crust, but a steel deck can't because it's not porous. No stone deck, and it just isn't going to be a NYC crust.

Let's hope the new guy Santiago can raise the bar...

well, to his credit, he did say he has never been to NYC....
 
May 29, 2006
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There are prob a couple good pizza places in FL with all of the people retiring from NYC, provided they can get decent flour. I'd also be worried about finding good help.

I live in a collegetown with well more than 50 pizza shops, and only three are close to to NYC quality. Hard to compete with $5 Dominoes, even though it's crap. Might as well get frozen and bake it. Meanwhile, a large slice of the good stuff is $3 and worth every penny.
 

dv8

Gold
Sep 27, 2006
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I dunno. I've made NYC style pizza professionally and what matters is the ingredients, the equipment, the technique, and prob most importantly, the flour, which in NYC is most commonly Gold Medal ALL TRUMPS, a high gluten flour with malted barley in it. The malted barley adds a beer flavor to the crust and also helps to keep the yeast lively. Water just isn't that big of a factor, though it makes a good story.

interesting. i make my own pizza too, i use gold medal flour and beer instead of water. of course it's all done in a normal oven so i am not anywhere close to a good pizza but this one is much better than most sold in DR. any tips on how to improve? i use home made sauce and i do not load it with ingredients.
 

the gorgon

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Sep 16, 2010
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interesting. i make my own pizza too, i use gold medal flour and beer instead of water. of course it's all done in a normal oven so i am not anywhere close to a good pizza but this one is much better than most sold in DR. any tips on how to improve? i use home made sauce and i do not load it with ingredients.

do you have a pizza stone? if you are using a regular oven, it helps
 

Chip

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Jul 25, 2007
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Santiago
The pizza at Monchi's is the best I've had anywhere in the DR and better than many places in the States.
 

Expat13

Silver
Jun 7, 2008
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Now if only a "gluten free" pizza in the DR. Would be cool to see a gluten free restaurant pop up one day in SD.
 

Luperon

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Ideally you also need an ITALIAN who knows how to throw the dough!

shortage-of-6-000-pizza-makers-in-italy-1367274102-4583.jpg
 

dv8

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Sep 27, 2006
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do you have a pizza stone? if you are using a regular oven, it helps

nope, we are using regular tray. but i looked up pizza stones on amazon just now... hmm... may be a good idea... shipping weight is high, thou... maybe i will wait until my in laws go to the states again and ask them to bring it over. looks very interesting...

i presume it also matters that my oven heats up unevenly, especially when there is no power and the fan inside is not working. baking here is not that easy.
 

Taino808

Bronze
Oct 10, 2010
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Looks interesting, as a self professed pizza connoisseur, I'll be swinging by there later on this afternoon for a bite or two.
 

the gorgon

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Sep 16, 2010
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nope, we are using regular tray. but i looked up pizza stones on amazon just now... hmm... may be a good idea... shipping weight is high, thou... maybe i will wait until my in laws go to the states again and ask them to bring it over. looks very interesting...

i presume it also matters that my oven heats up unevenly, especially when there is no power and the fan inside is not working. baking here is not that easy.

the heat distribution from a pizza stone makes for a far better crust. it also has something to do with the moisture retention in the dough.
 

Expat13

Silver
Jun 7, 2008
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nope, we are using regular tray. but i looked up pizza stones on amazon just now... hmm... may be a good idea... shipping weight is high, thou... maybe i will wait until my in laws go to the states again and ask them to bring it over. looks very interesting...

i presume it also matters that my oven heats up unevenly, especially when there is no power and the fan inside is not working. baking here is not that easy.

There is an easy DIY version of which the DR is plentiful. Lots of stone/clay tiles here. Buy the stone tiles and place in oven. See link for an example How to Make a 3 Dollar Pizza Stone | The Paupered Chef
 

the gorgon

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Sep 16, 2010
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Looks interesting, as a self professed pizza connoisseur, I'll be swinging by there later on this afternoon for a bite or two.

yes, really interesting, especially those irregular bubbles on the outside of the crust. you sure as heck cannot fold the slice with two fingers, and, if you can't, it is not NY pizza.
 

Taino808

Bronze
Oct 10, 2010
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yes, really interesting, especially those irregular bubbles on the outside of the crust. you sure as heck cannot fold the slice with two fingers, and, if you can't, it is not NY pizza.


I'm not one to judge something from a simple picture, I rather go there for myself and actually try it out, before making up my mind about whether I like it or not.
 

dv8

Gold
Sep 27, 2006
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ok, the thing is i ain't a specialist. i prepare pizza in a tray and into hot oven it goes. i am not sure i am capable of making a pizza on a piece of wood and then slide it on a hot stone/pan that is already in the oven. this is a level above me.
but i think i may give it a go and at least try. it seems that pizza making requires some investment in tools, eh? special trays, a shovel...