Ocean Temperatures

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bob saunders

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No sane person claims carbon fuels should be forsaken for these exact reasons you state. However, why not use them for these purposes and at least try to cut them where we can? Electricity production and personal vehicles being the obvious. And your statement about climate scientists all about the $ is pure bunk IMO. Maybe a very vast minority see profits as their motive but I would bet the house most see science and concern for future generations instead.
Sure , when full nuclear power generation is used, grid updated, then we can lower fossil fuel use.
 
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XQT

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We will always have plastics, unless you want everything to return to steel, we will always need asphalt, jet fuel, caulking, solvents, fertilizer, cell phones, epoxies, paint, industrial belts and lubricants, nail polish, antiseptics, solar panels, cell phone antennas on towers, wind turbine blades, roofing, vinyl and rubber - so fossil fuel is not going away, not in the next 200 years.

In fact there are at least 6,000 everyday products that require fossil fuel (oil or N. gas).

The dream of an world devoid of oil being pumped is a fantasy and so may lemmings are shutting down roads in Europe to end all fossil fuels - and probably coordinated the protests on their cell phones.

Zero Carbon is impossible - but if you just buy some of Al Gores carbon credits and say 3 hail Marys you will be absolved of fossil fuel sin.
A lot of it are political dreams.
Yes we are a long way from operating without fossil fuels.
Modern hybrid cars have reduced emissions substantially, even regular combustion engines excluding passenger car diesel.

At the moment many EV's cost more to fuel than gasoline.
If ever there would be only EV's people would have a rude awakening.

Paying installation of private charging stations in houses and condos.
Paying for public charging stations.
Construction of EV's is not environmentally friendly neither is disposal.
Electricity rates will go up substantially once everyone is hooked in.

At the moment electric power grids are insufficient and need major expansion,
And we have to answer how the are powered.
Each country has different challenges, northern climates, no hydro power, few or no natural resources.
We are a long way from generating electric power from just solar and wind sources.
Bridge technologies are needed and continued use of fossil fuels.

Use EV's and include combustion engines and all renewable sources when possible.
Use central heating power plants for condos in cities.
Most importantly have efficient public transit.
Subways, trams, light urban rail and fast long distance rail.

Modern public transit infrastructure will be the most important for the environment.
Yet many governments are not investing in modern infrastructure.
Canada has very poor performance in public transit expansion as a G7 member,
Yet a lot of talk about zero carbon cap.

Sure Bob you can hop on a bus and be stuck in the Jam.
Better stay in Jarabacoa, less worries.

Ocean temperatures and climate are a concern.
Yet no need to panic.
We may be long extinct before our activities make the planets climate uninhabitable.
During the roughly 174 million years that dinosaurs existed, the world changed greatly.
We are a LONG way from equaling dinosaur existence.

Good luck to you all, have some fun in the DR or elsewhere in the world.
 

XQT

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Yes change is constant and what may considered as warm places now maybe considered cold places in the next decades.

I lived in Oregon for several years and in the winter of 2008 it was one of the coldest on record.
Portland was snowed in, as was the entire Willamette Valley, which usually has temperate winters - then came an ice storm.

I could not get from Portland to Bend to visit my elderly parents even with chains and my 4-wheel drive for several weeks.
So why was it one of the worst winters ? Who knows - weather always changes.

You should have moved them to Eugene or Roseburg for better accessibility. :)
 

XQT

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Fair enough on your statement - although there are plenty of protesters in Europe who want to "Just Stop Oil", demanding all fossil fuel be terminated. They are of course nose-ring wearing, purple-haired dunderheads

And renewables do make up to 18% of electricity in the US - 'during daylight summer hours'

However renewables only produce electricity, but none of the other 6,000 items that oil is used to produce, which includes the solar panels on a roof to feedback to the grid. Some utilities in some states and some municipalities are blocking permits on solar hookups back to grids. California is about to implement a tax of up $600/year on any new rooftop solar system.

And to charge those electric cars at night (95% of EVs are charged at night when solar power leaves the grid)
It takes roughly 70 pounds of coal to produce the energy required to charge a 66 kWh electric car battery and would take 8-10 gallons of a barrel of oil ( 22% of a 42 gallon barrel of oil ). This equates to 4 gallons of gasoline if it were refined for fuel.

A full full 295 mile range charge on a Tesla at a Supercharge station costs $6.37 per 100 miles and requires ~ 2 hours (if a spot is available).
A 2023 Hyundai Elantra hybrid (non-plug in model) gets 50 mpg average on gasoline and requires 7 minutes to fill. (55 mpg on highway)

So in Palm Beach, Florida, at $3.65 a gallon, the cost to go 100 miles in a Elantra is $7.30 (93 cents more than a Tesla per 100 miles), however your total range will be 550 miles between fuel fill-ups, while your range on a Tesla Model Y is about 295 miles of range, (ideal with a new battery, using no AC or heat), less distance in cold weather.

So you would be about 140 miles (two hours of driving) behind the Elantra on spring time cross country drive after the first 6.2 hours of the trip, at a driving speed 70 mph.
Or 20 hours behind on a 3,000 mile trip which would be over two days later if driving only 8 hours per day.
This is why it isn't practical now for tractor trailer rigs to go electric, although there are many experimental big rigs being tested.
They can drive a maximum of 11 hours/day by law and they get paid per mile of trip, so they don't want to be parked, even an hour, to recharge.

Interestingly there are people now selling conversion kits for natural gas home generators to charge EVs.

A first step would be to eliminate coal power electric plants and convert them to gas turbine plants.
A process underway in the US for example and then stopped by the coal baron lobby.

Ev's may be ok in urban environments for those who can afford them and who have home charging stations.
Large distances in Canada and the US and cold winters make EV's less than optimal.

Mid-priced ICE cars cost $11 to drive 100 miles; comparable EVs cost $12 to $16 depending on charging modality

Overview of Findings by Vehicle Type, Q2 2023

  • Entry-priced cars and crossovers: In the entry-priced segment, gas-powered cars were the most economical to fuel at around $9.78 per 100 purposeful miles. That’s significantly more affordable than an entry-priced EV charged mostly at home ($12.55), and it’s a dramatic savings over an EV charged mostly at commercial charging stations ($15.97).
  • Mid-priced cars and crossovers: ICE vehicles were also more affordable to fuel in this segment, at approximately $11.08 per 100 miles. This cost is lower than that for primarily home EV charging ($12.62) and for mostly commercial EV charging ($16.10).
  • Luxury-priced cars and crossovers: In the luxury segment, electric vehicles charged mostly at home were the most economical. High-end EV drivers paid around $13.50 per 100 miles, as opposed to the $17.56 it would have cost to fuel a comparable ICE car. Luxury EV drivers charging mostly commercially, however, paid slightly more than they would have in an ICE vehicle ($17.81).
  • Pickup trucks: At around $17.10 per 100 miles, diesel-powered trucks were less expensive to fuel than their gas or electric counterparts. Gasoline-powered pickups cost about $17.58 to fuel, while EV trucks charged mostly at home cost $17.72. Drivers of electric pickups who needed to charge commercially most of the time found themselves paying about $26.38—exceeding their diesel counterparts by about $9.
 

XQT

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Sure , when full nuclear power generation is used, grid updated, then we can lower fossil fuel use.
Obviously nuclear waste storage is still a problem.

Yet one should not discount nuclear energy and advancement of this technology.
Germany with very few natural resources and coal has a big problem, Japan another country lacking natural resources.
Getting out of coal, nuclear power, cutting Russian gas, resulted in major problems for German industry and citizens.

Nuclear micro reactors may be a technology moving forward, also for the DR.
Nuclear is getting smaller … and it’s opening up some big opportunities for the industry.

A handful of microreactor designs are under development in the United States, and they could be ready to roll out within the next decade.

These compact reactors will be small enough to transport by truck and could help solve energy challenges in a number of areas, ranging from remote commercial or residential locations to military bases.


 

XQT

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Except it takes more than 50 years now to get a nuclear power plant from idea to ribbon cutting
Yet it was a decision of the German government to shut down modern operating nuclear power plants.
The could have continued running as a bridge.
In winter a large part of electrical power generation came through increased use of coal,
One of the worst polluting fuels.
Also power was shared from French nuclear power plants.

The DR should focus to eliminate coal use and switch to gas turbine power plants.
Maybe micro nuclear could be included.
 
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ben jammin

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This guy's nearly 60? If he's the poster child for fast driving and hard living then count me out :oops:
 

chico bill

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El Hijo de Manolo

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Ocean temperatures and climate are a concern.
Yet no need to panic.
The Earth's core, not the atmosphere, is, and always has been, responsible for global catastrophe. It will be the Earth's core and the sun's heat or an asteroid that will bring about the Earth's finality. The sun will much outlast poor Earth.
 

XQT

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And so this is how I feel about EVs, except i'm way past 60:


If way past 60 you will make it without EV's, especially in the DR.

And this is just for short 500 mile trips.
US and CAN cover large distances for road trips.
Maybe they will try to shame us for flying and driving??

Business Insider Business Insider

I took 2 500-mile drives in electric SUVs and experienced the good, the bad, and the ugly of EV road tripping​


 

XQT

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The Earth's core, not the atmosphere, is, and always has been, responsible for global catastrophe. It will be the Earth's core and the sun's heat or an asteroid that will bring about the Earth's finality. The sun will much outlast poor Earth.
To quote a thoughtful guy,
"Folks let me make this simple. For 4.5 billion years, species, land and oceans have come and gone. One day the Earth will be a dead planet. The human effect on the Earth is less than notable. We will be sucked into a black hole (the sun), be hit by an asteroid, or the core will melt the Earth billions of years before the human element can cause the same level of damage."

First let's see if we can equal the Dinosaurs 175 million years??
 

NanSanPedro

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To quote a thoughtful guy,
"Folks let me make this simple. For 4.5 billion years, species, land and oceans have come and gone. One day the Earth will be a dead planet. The human effect on the Earth is less than notable. We will be sucked into a black hole (the sun), be hit by an asteroid, or the core will melt the Earth billions of years before the human element can cause the same level of damage."

First let's see if we can equal the Dinosaurs 175 million years??
We already know what's going to happen. We just don't know when.
 

El Hijo de Manolo

It's outrageous, egregious, preposterous!
Dec 10, 2021
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To quote a thoughtful guy,
"Folks let me make this simple. For 4.5 billion years, species, land and oceans have come and gone. One day the Earth will be a dead planet. The human effect on the Earth is less than notable. We will be sucked into a black hole (the sun), be hit by an asteroid, or the core will melt the Earth billions of years before the human element can cause the same level of damage."

First let's see if we can equal the Dinosaurs 175 million years??
Impossible
 

Gadfly

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In about 5 billion years, the Sun is due to turn into a red giant. The core of the star will shrink, but its outer layers will expand out to the orbit of Mars, engulfing our planet in the process. If it's even still there. No super nova - black hole scenario. Global warming to the max
 

XQT

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Daily Global 5km Satellite Coral Bleaching Heat Stress HotSpot


‘Huge’ coral bleaching unfolding across the Americas prompts fears of global tragedy​

Scientists stunned by unprecedented heat-stress event say they can only hope it ‘motivates and unites people’
Corals across several countries are bleaching and dying en masse from unprecedented levels of heat stress, prompting fears that an unfolding tragedy in Central America, North America and the Caribbean could become a global event.


Dominican Republic
Geographic Distribution and Extent of Coral Reefs: The Dominican Republic has 1576 km of coast including the islands of Saona, Catalina, Beata and the Cayos Siete Hermanos, with coral reefs along 166 km and mangroves along 377 km. The longest reef (64.2 km) is to the northwest of Montecristi. Most of these are fringing reefs, but there are also 2 barrier reefs, numerous patch reefs, and 4 large offshore banks. On the east and northwest coasts, there are broad coastal shallow platforms with barrier reefs. In most other places, high turbidity prevents reefs from forming.
Status of coral reefs prior to 2005: CARICOMP data show that coral cover rose from 8.2% in 2000 to 11.5% in 2001 and Reef Check surveys showed mean coral cover of 19.4% at Bayahibe in 2004.
Impacts of Coral Bleaching in 2005: Reef Check surveys recorded significant bleaching at all sites surveyed during September/October 2005. Bleaching affected as much as 68% of live corals, with the majority of colonies being entirely bleached. The average mortality was 11% across all sites surveyed, but there was great variation between sites with mortality ranging
78
The Effects of Coral Bleaching in the Northern Caribbean and Western Atlantic
between 0% and 38%. Significant bleaching also occurred between late May and the end of August 2006, with bleaching affecting between 66% and 85% of living coral cover and individual colonies exhibiting bleaching over 50-95% of their surface areas.
 
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