Old World Spanish Words.

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M.A.R.

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Has anyone had the opportunity to be around older folks who still use those old Spanish words.

My father's 85+ years old cousin uses these old words and today I finally got the right spelling of this one - he says "faidequera" and it should be faltriquera which means 1. f. Bolsillo de las prendas de vestir.
2. f. Bolsillo que se atan las mujeres a la cintura y llevan colgando
debajo del vestido o delantal.

translation - pockets (clothes) or pockets women would tie to their waists under their dresses or aprons.

...........and I would always laughed when him and his wife would say "blume", (bloomers), and Mexicans say "calzones" for panties.
 

Marianopolita

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Great topic-

M.A.R-

This is a great topic as it relates to the Spanish language. You titled the thread "Old World Spanish Words" but in linguistic terms the topic is called arca?smos. In the Spanish language today there are still many that have not gone out of use in Latin America and according to studies done by modern day linguists Mexico is one of the countries with the highest numbers of "arca?smos" still prevalently used today but all Latin American countries still have vestiges of archaic vocabulary, grammar and phonetic aspects relating to the pronunciation of words.

The archaisms go back to colonization. The vocabulary was brought from the colonizers and remained part of the lexical mosaic of many LA countries. Today the usage of archaisms tends to be among the older generation, in rural areas (los campos), among less educated speakers, in literature by some authors etc. linguistic studies reveal more classifications.

If you are interested in this area of study of the Spanish language I encourage you to pursue it. There's plenty of information in written form (essays) if you are curious about "arca?smos" in the spoken language today. Some grammarians call these archaic forms "inculto" whether it's vocabulary like the examples in your first post, or archaic grammatical forms or phonetic changes in words.

Two years ago I bought a book that covers various aspects of Spanish that I was not looking for specifically. I was browsing and found it interesting. It's not an exhaustive resource by any means but the topics covered in brief are informative and precise. Arca?smos is one of the topics and it lists a few of the ones that are commonly heard still today in Spain and Latin America and their equivalent modern day forms.

Here are some examples of vocabulary archaisms: naiden = nadie, aldrede= adrede, delantar= delantal, haiga= haya, onque= aunque, vide= vi, trompezar= tropezar and many more. The book I am currently reading by D. Chaviano has quite a few because they tie in with the characters depicted.

The book is a small reference but very good. Here is the title if you are interested:

Espa?ol para los hispanos
By P. Baker
ISBN 0-8442-716-3
NTC National Textbook Company

_________________________

-LDG.
 
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Mirador

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Here are some examples of vocabulary archaisms: naiden = nadie, aldrede= adrede, delantar= delantal, haiga= haya, onque= aunque, vide= vi, trompezar= tropezar and many more.

In some of the backwood villages of the DR South West, there are people who still talk like there in the 16th century. They will say things like "vamo a dir" (instead of the modern "vamos a ir")...
 

M.A.R.

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M.A.R-



The book is a small reference but very good. Here is the title if you are interested:

Espa?ol para los hispanos
By P. Baker
ISBN 0-8442-716-3
NTC National Textbook Company

_________________________

-LDG.


I'll go and buy it, thanks Lesly, very interesting.

The older folks did used these words but unfortunatly there are not that many left.

Other Words:
Muda - an additional change of clothes
Alforja - food carried for a road trip.
 

Norma Rosa

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I'll go and buy it, thanks Lesly, very interesting.

The older folks did used these words but unfortunatly there are not that many left.

Other Words:
Muda - an additional change of clothes
Alforja - food carried for a road trip.

Thanks for the thread, MAR.
El Cibao is an area where many arcaisms are heard.
My parents used "muda". They used "alforja" to refer to the bag in which food is carried. I believe "alforja" comes to us from the Arabs.
You mention "blumers" on post #1. Where I grew up we say "blumen".

Other words:
tisana (t?)
alpargatas (sandalias)

Here to help and learn,
Norma
 

Norma Rosa

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MAR,
I looked up the word "alforja". It is a bag (saco) closed at both extremes with an opening in the center; It is also the food carried for a road trip, as you stated above.

Here to learn and help,
Norma
 

Mirador

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C?rdoba.
Lejana y sola.

Jaca negra, luna grande,
y aceitunas en mi alforja.
Aunque sepa los caminos
yo nunca llegar? a C?rdoba.

Por el llano, por el viento,
jaca negra, luna roja.
La muerte me est? mirando
desde las torres de C?rdoba.

?Ay qu? camino tan largo!
?Ay mi jaca valerosa!
?Ay, que la muerte me espera,
antes de llegar a C?rdoba!

C?rdoba.
Lejana y sola.


Federico Garc?a Lorca (1898-1936)​
 

Chirimoya

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Dec 9, 2002
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alpargatas (sandalias)
The word Alpargatas (another word of Arabic origin) is alive and well in Spain - meaning those canvas shoes with rope soles that are typical of the Basque region. Known as espadrilles in English.
 

Norma Rosa

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C?rdoba.
Lejana y sola.

Jaca negra, luna grande,
y aceitunas en mi alforja.
Aunque sepa los caminos
yo nunca llegar? a C?rdoba.

Por el llano, por el viento,
jaca negra, luna roja.
La muerte me est? mirando
desde las torres de C?rdoba.

?Ay qu? camino tan largo!
?Ay mi jaca valerosa!
?Ay, que la muerte me espera,
antes de llegar a C?rdoba!

C?rdoba.
Lejana y sola.


Federico Garc?a Lorca (1898-1936)​

Ah, the man -Mr. Lorca! Gracias, Mirador.

Poetry lovers, why don't we have a section on poetry?
 

M.A.R.

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Feb 18, 2006
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Ah, the man -Mr. Lorca! Gracias, Mirador.

Poetry lovers, why don't we have a section on poetry?

I like that poem, I think you idea is great Norma.

Would it have to be only Dominican poets?

One word that I'm trying to figure out, because of course in the campos, well in the DR, many things are mispronounced, the word "alforja" as in bags could be used to discribe this but in the campos they say "la saigana" (cibaeno, of course, :)) those bags that are made of "guano" straw put over the donkey to carry stuff, I can't figure out what is the real word in "la saigana" ????????
 
May 31, 2005
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The word Alpargatas (another word of Arabic origin) is alive and well in Spain - meaning those canvas shoes with rope soles that are typical of the Basque region. Known as espadrilles in English.

That is what I grew up thinking alpargatas were. The canvas shoes with rope soles. I never called alpargatas sandals.

I grew up in Santo Domingo by the way.
 

Norma Rosa

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Feb 20, 2007
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I like that poem, I think you idea is great Norma.

Would it have to be only Dominican poets?

One word that I'm trying to figure out, because of course in the campos, well in the DR, many things are mispronounced, the word "alforja" as in bags could be used to discribe this but in the campos they say "la saigana" (cibaeno, of course, :)) those bags that are made of "guano" straw put over the donkey to carry stuff, I can't figure out what is the real word in "la saigana" ????????

El ?lgana, (las ?lganas) is what you are referring to.

Let's talk with the Mod. about the poetry section.
 

Norma Rosa

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That is what I grew up thinking alpargatas were. The canvas shoes with rope soles. I never called alpargatas sandals.

I grew up in Santo Domingo by the way.

You might be right. (Maybe I shouldn't have used the word sandalias.) However, I do remember that any type of "chancletas" were called alpargatas. The word also took a negative connotation since it was applied to any shoes in a very bad condition.
 

Mirador

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Some times I go into "old fashioned" mode, and ask my wife to please bring me my "pantuflas" (slippers) from under our bed, and on the way, please pick up my "espejuelos" (eye glasses) from my desk so I can read el "caribe" (which is an archaic generic Dominican term for any newspaper). My country-raised wife is so young, that once, while watching an old movie on TV, she asked me what was that black clunky device with a dial on a table (she had never seen a phone without pushbuttons in her entire life). She's 24, and I'm 60, and we have a 6 year-old child. OK, go ahead and say it, I should be serving 10-20 and registered as a sex-offender...;-).
 

something_of_the_night

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Some times I go into "old fashioned" mode, and ask my wife to please bring me my "pantuflas" (slippers) from under our bed, and on the way, please pick up my "espejuelos" (eye glasses) from my desk so I can read el "caribe" (which is an archaic generic Dominican term for any newspaper). My country-raised wife is so young, that once, while watching an old movie on TV, she asked me what was that black clunky device with a dial on a table (she had never seen a phone without pushbuttons in her entire life). She's 24, and I'm 60, and we have a 6 year-old child. OK, go ahead and say it, I should be serving 10-20 and registered as a sex-offender...;-).

...and do you remember when all brands of blue jeans were called 'rodeo'?

And, is papuch? still being used? How 'bout chalina and t?bano?

Do they still sell habaneros gruesos y habaneros finos?
 
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