Old World Spanish Words.

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M.A.R.

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Feb 18, 2006
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Some times I go into "old fashioned" mode, and ask my wife to please bring me my "pantuflas" (slippers) from under our bed, and on the way, please pick up my "espejuelos" (eye glasses) from my desk so I can read el "caribe" (which is an archaic generic Dominican term for any newspaper). My country-raised wife is so young, that once, while watching an old movie on TV, she asked me what was that black clunky device with a dial on a table (she had never seen a phone without pushbuttons in her entire life). She's 24, and I'm 60, and we have a 6 year-old child. OK, go ahead and say it, I should be serving 10-20 and registered as a sex-offender...;-).

oh lord :rolleyes: como la conseguiste, con un hechizo de esos que te sabes?:cheeky:
 

Norma Rosa

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Feb 20, 2007
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El ?lgana, (las ?lganas) is what you are referring to.

QUOTE]

I tried looking for that word in the Dictionary before I asked the question and I couldn't find it, even with the accent, could you post the definition?

MAR, I looked up the word in many dictionaries but can not find it. Maybe it is an "indigenismo" or even a "dominicanismo."
You gave the definition above. It is sort of a saddle bag made of "guano" (one pouch on each side).
 
C

Chip00

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Has anybody mentioned the word pulperia...now colmado or bodega.

I hear "pulperia" and a lot in the campo in Moca.

I also hear "chucheria" which I understand means stuff that they sell in a colmado.
 

2LeftFeet

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Dec 1, 2006
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Are these words more of a Dominican heritage or would anyone use them? I know colmado is primarily Dominican?

Thanks
 

something_of_the_night

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And whatever happened to aeroplano?

Well, thanks to the good culture-conscious folks in France, we fly aviones.
 
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Pib

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hey say "la saigana" (cibaeno, of course,
The correct spelling would be las ?rganas. ?rgana is, according to RAE, out of use, and they don't even provide the meaning, but say that its related to the word ?rgano, which was an instrument to lift heavy loads. Maybe the word came to acquire its meaning (in the D.R.) long ago and still survives here because of that.

I can read el "caribe" (which is an archaic generic Dominican term for any newspaper).
El Caribe is the name of one of the country's oldest newspaper, it is now a generic name, same as 'list?n' (and kotex, Ace, and many others I can't remember now).

An authentic arcaic word that seems to be only used here, and in a specific region of the country at that is aguaitar. And yes, it's spelled just like that.

?Aguaita mama!
 

Pib

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Maybe the word came to acquire its meaning (in the D.R.) long ago and still survives here because of that.
I guess this is wrong. Apparently in Argentina ?rgana is the same as here.

Cuando los v?veres y los jinetes son muchos, alivia el viaje un animal de carga, llamado chaznero (deriva de chazna: montura-apero ajustado con [Argana de frente] una cincha que sostendr? los porta-carga), en el pueden colocarse una chigua (red de cuero con borde de madera: el molle es muy utilizado) o una ?rgana (especie de alforja grande, de cuero, muy resistente y cabedora).

Consejas para el cerro
 

Chirimoya

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Dec 9, 2002
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"Apear/apearse" (to get down from) and "acechar" (to observe) are all but obsolete in Spain but still common here.

Coincidentally a friend just sent me an article she wrote, which contains the following paragraph:
Espadrilles ? the good old-fashioned ?alpargatas? ? are not a sign of progress. The uppers are made out of cloth and the soles out of some kind of hemp-like material. Their only concession to the twentieth century came in the form of a thin rubber layer on the sole that, as often as not, parts company with the hemp and has to be glued back on. Yet, for a woman whose feet have developed a mind of their own over the past few years, they serve me far better than expensive sandals have done. They are cool, comfortable and cheap enough for me to get a batch of them every summer if need be.
 

M.A.R.

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Wonderful Pib, thanks for this, its exactly what it is but of course in the campos of the DR they are made of "guano". I guess the word had to come from Spain to both the DR and Argentina.

Cuando los v?veres y los jinetes son muchos, alivia el viaje un animal de carga, llamado chaznero (deriva de chazna: montura-apero ajustado con [Argana de frente] una cincha que sostendr? los porta-carga), en el pueden colocarse una chigua (red de cuero con borde de madera: el molle es muy utilizado) o una ?rgana (especie de alforja grande, de cuero, muy resistente y cabedora).
 

Pib

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Espadrilles ? the good old-fashioned ?alpargatas? ? are not a sign of progress. The uppers are made out of cloth and the soles out of some kind of hemp-like material. Their only concession to the twentieth century came in the form of a thin rubber layer on the sole that, as often as not, parts company with the hemp and has to be glued back on. Yet, for a woman whose feet have developed a mind of their own over the past few years, they serve me far better than expensive sandals have done. They are cool, comfortable and cheap enough for me to get a batch of them every summer if need be.
Said of something that is not well-defined: "como la mulata, que no es blanca ni es prieta. Y como la alpargata, que no es zapato ni es chancleta".
 

Norma Rosa

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The correct spelling would be las ?rganas. ?rgana is, according to RAE, out of use, and they don't even provide the meaning, but say that its related to the word ?rgano, which was an instrument to lift heavy loads. Maybe the word came to acquire its meaning (in the D.R.) long ago and still survives here because of that.

?Aguaita mama!

MAR, I did look up the word with "l" and "r" and did find the definition above given, however, I was not satisfied with it since "?rgano" is a machine.

1. m. M?quina a modo de gr?a para subir piedras o cosas de mucho peso. (RAE)

It might have come from it, who knows.
 

Pib

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We know that the word existed but is archaic. We know that it is also used in Argentina to mean the same thing, thus we can conclude that at some point, when it was widely-used it meant what it means now in the D.R and Argentina (couldn't find a cite about other countries, but Argentinian and Dominican Spanish are as far apart as they could be).

Sherlock Pib :)
 

Norma Rosa

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(and kotex, Ace, and many others I can't remember now).

My observation is that, when a foreign product first enters the island, its brand name is considered the product itself.

Few years ago, while visiting my sister in the DR, her daughter said, "No hay Ace" which translates as there is no soap.

cutex=nail polish

.
 

Motorcycler

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Here are a couple of cantabric vasque words that crossed over into the old culture. When young I used to hear it all the time, today it is pretty much history though it is still heard.

"equelequ?" = eso mismo (used to signify consent or approval of something said)

"abur"= adios (goodbye, see you later)
 
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