On January 26 they will decide whether to send Kenyan troops to Haiti

windeguy

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Whoopsie! Those pesky courts again:

Already old news that is, but yes... that was their "last chance".

What's next, what's next, what's next....

Nobody is dumb enough to go in and try to fix it, so is there the will for change to come from within?
And can the DR contain what might bleed into the DR?
 
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NanSanPedro

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It was the French that screwed Haiti. Let them fix it.
While yea, the French started the f-up that is Haiti, the USA had a lot to do with it as well. From my limited readings, the Wilson occupation from 1915 until 1934 also devastated the country. I'm fairly certain the USA stole Haiti's gold which seriously helped to keep them a 4th world country.
 

cavok

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While yea, the French started the f-up that is Haiti, the USA had a lot to do with it as well. From my limited readings, the Wilson occupation from 1915 until 1934 also devastated the country. I'm fairly certain the USA stole Haiti's gold which seriously helped to keep them a 4th world country.
Well, I guess you could add that to earthquakes, hurricanes diseases, and corrupt presidents that looted Haiti way more than any gold the US might have stolen, but I think it was the massive reparations that Haiti had to pay France for its freedom which took over a hundred years to pay off that put them on a path thy have never been able to recover from.
 
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bob saunders

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While yea, the French started the f-up that is Haiti, the USA had a lot to do with it as well. From my limited readings, the Wilson occupation from 1915 until 1934 also devastated the country. I'm fairly certain the USA stole Haiti's gold which seriously helped to keep them a 4th world country.
I disagree, while the outside actors certainly didn't help Haiti too much, most of the blame for Haiti's problems are because of Haitians.
 
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CristoRey

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While yea, the French started the f-up that is Haiti, the USA had a lot to do with it as well. From my limited readings, the Wilson occupation from 1915 until 1934 also devastated the country. I'm fairly certain the USA stole Haiti's gold which seriously helped to keep them a 4th world country.
The French had Haiti in a no-win situation long before 1915. Most of their current/ modern day problems can be traced back to one man, François Duvalier aka Papa Doc, just like a lot of the Dominican Republic's current/ mordern day problems be traced back to Rafael Trujillo.
 

USA DOC

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Already old news that is, but yes... that was their "last chance".

What's next, what's next, what's next....

Nobody is dumb enough to go in and try to fix it, so is there the will for change to come from within?
And can the DR contain what might bleed into the DR?
It has been bleeding into the DR for years... and how does the DR government contain it, so far little to nothing
 
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windeguy

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It has been bleeding into the DR for years... and how does the DR government contain it, so far little to nothing
Yes, but I am talking about keeping major issues contained in Haiti. We all know about the deportations and returns of Haitians that I nicknamed Project Boomerang. And about the Haitian births in DR hospitals that are a tax drain...

But this is about containing the violence, shootings and kidnappings within Haiti so DR citizens don't become collateral damage to this perpetual failed state without hope of improvement in our lifetime.
 

windeguy

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Doesn't look like there is a Plan B with Keny out of the picture:


But after the Security Council passed the resolution for a non-U.N. multinational armed force, the High Court in Kenya put a hold on the deployment until it could hear the challenge.

Stéphane Dujarric, spokesman for U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres, said the need for the multinational force “remains extremely high.” He reminded journalists at a press briefing that it was not the U.N. that designated Kenya for help, but the country’s own authorities who stepped forward.

“We need urgent action. We need urgent funding and we hope that member states will continue to do their part and then some,” he said during a press briefing in New York.

On Thursday, members of the Security Council expressed worries about the spreading violence in the troubled Caribbean nation. Diplomats, including Haiti’s foreign minister, Jean Victor Geneus, pleaded for the rapid deployment of the Multinational Security Support mission. The situation, he said, has gotten sadder and bleaker with the security and humanitarian situation deteriorating.


“The Haitian people can’t take it anymore,” Geneus said.

Last year, Haiti saw gang-related killings double, he said, to at least 5,000 people and kidnappings soared to more than 2,900. As many as 37 police officers were killed by gangs.

“In our country, statistics are sometimes problematic, and so the reality is probably worse,” Geneus said. “The situation has prompted over 200,000 people to become internally displaced; they’ve fled their neighborhoods, their homes, which are sometimes being settled by the gangs.”

In response to the Kenya court’s ruling, the president of the Chamber of Deputies in the Dominican Republic, Alfredo Pacheco, said his nation, which shares the island of Hispaniola with Haiti, will need to tighten security measures to prevent a spillover of the spreading violence. Increased tensions along the border this week led to a shutdown of Ounanminthe, the northern Haitian city bordering the Dominican town of Dajabón, by protesters seeking to remove Prime Minister Ariel Henry from power.


“Every day, the situation in Haiti becomes incredibly more complicated,” Pacheco told journalists. “We have to agree that the international community is perhaps underestimating the problems occurring in Haiti.”

In addition to escalating gang violence and kidnappings, a former rebel leader and convicted felon who 20 years ago launched a violent coup against the president has launched “a revolution” to oust Henry.

Guy Philippe is demanding the resignation of Henry, who has been governing since President Jovenel Moïse was assassinated on July 7, 2021 inside his bedroom in the hills above Port-au-Prince. Earlier this week, Philippe’s supporters marched through the streets of Haiti’s Central Plateau shutting down government offices. They are attempting to make their way into Port-au-Prince by crossing gang-controlled territory.

On Thursday, the Dominican Republic expressed concerns about Philippe’s tactics during the Security Council’s session on Haiti. Foreign Minister Roberto Alvarez, pleading for the rapid deployment of a force to help Haiti, said “the situation has been ripe for the emergence of new political movers who, putting themselves forward as messiahs, are acting opportunistically and are damaging and destabilizing as the gangs.”


“These sectors have gone so far as to call for an insurrection and for civil disobedience,” Alvarez said. “We firmly reject these extremely harmful influences for Haitian democracy.”

But much of the focus at the U.N. meeting was on the armed gangs, with representatives insisting that to confront the challenges in Haiti and put an end to the violence the multinational security support mission must be deployed as soon as possible. They argued that any delay in the deployment threatens any opportunity for the restoration of security to Haiti.

Tirana Hassan, executive director of Human Rights Watch, told the Security Council that Haitians told her group about struggling to feed their families in the midst of the violence, and while aware of past problems Haitians have faced with foreign forces, “they recognize that international support is needed now.”

In addition to Kenya, several African and Caribbean countries, including Jamaica, volunteered to field the mission. But they were considered too small to lead the effort.

Kenya’s permanent representative to the U.N., Martin Kimani, told the Council that his government has made significant progress in preparing for the mission. But he also acknowledged that there remain gaps in funding and equipment.

So far, the government of Henry, who pressed for international help after gangs took control of the country’s main fuel terminal in Port-au-Prince in the fall of 2022, has remained silent on Friday’s news from Kenya.

Others said they were disappointed with the court’s decision, although some Haiti observers said they were not surprised given concerns about past international forces and the ongoing political crisis in Haiti. Despite repeated calls from the international community, Henry and his opponents have been unable to reach an agreement on how to move ahead with long overdue elections.

“The Kenya-led international intervention could have brought some relief and improved access to critical public infrastructure such as roads, administration buildings, hospitals, schools, and markets,” said Laurent Uwumuremyi, the director of Mercy Corps., an international aid agency working in Haiti. “However, based on past experience with international missions ..., international interventions have had disastrous consequences.”

“Solutions for Haiti, including those to bolster the Haitian National Police and the army to tamp down violence and return some semblance of security, should be led by Haitians,” Uwumuremyi added.

The effort to send a multinational force to Haiti was led by the United States, which was seeking a way to avoid sending another U.N. peacekeeping mission to Haiti. As part of its campaign to get other nations to support the measure, the U.S. stressed that it would be a law enforcement, not a military effort.

The decision by the high court in Nairobi blocking the participation of Kenya’s police raises difficult questions for supporters of the multinational force, including whether to push for the deployment of a traditional U.N. peacekeeping mission, and whether Kenya could still lead the effort using troops instead of police.

©2024 Miami Herald. Visit miamiherald.com. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
 

windeguy

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Edwin Paraison, a former Haitian diplomat and executive director of a foundation that seeks to strengthen ties between neighboring Haiti and the Dominican Republic, said he would be surprised if international leaders did not have an alternative plan .
I doubt there is a Plan B
The ruling, however, would allow Haiti to apply its own solutions against violence , he added, noting that he believes it has sufficient resources .
Sufficient resources for that? Well, have at it and let us know how that goes.
 

XQT

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Well, I guess you could add that to earthquakes, hurricanes diseases, and corrupt presidents that looted Haiti way more than any gold the US might have stolen, but I think it was the massive reparations that Haiti had to pay France for its freedom which took over a hundred years to pay off that put them on a path thy have never been able to recover from.
It's the easy way out whining about colonialism.
Long before colonialism human history is written by conquest, subjugation, and colonialism by Mongols, Chinese, Muslems and many others throughout history.
Including migration from Africa to Europe, Asia and across the Bering Straight to North and South America.
It's the way of humans, which still continues today.

The worst damage done to Haiti is by Haitians, including those who have received shelter in foreign countries, become rich and now still are destabilizing Haiti.
Time Haitians take responsibility and organize their affairs, as many other Nations have done.

Should Kenyan troops enter and try to control Haiti, just because they are black Africans?
Enough billions of international aid have been wasted on Haiti, just to be stolen by Haitians in power.

Kenya and all of Africa under self control is mired in corruption, along tribal lines, religious lines stealing billions of aid money.
Read African history before white man ever arrived in Africa.
Wars and Kings, slavery and warfare were common.
Human psyche and history.

I just hope that the DR can protect itself from Haitian refugees and criminals.

Just go to overburdened DR clinics and medical centres, see how they are overburdened with Haitians, including those giving birth in the DR.
The DR has no financial resources to organize its own country.
No money for simple tasks,
like filling pot holes or sidewalks.
 
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XQT

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I'm sure there are many diseases not yet present in Haiti. The last contribution of the UN was leaving Haiti with cholera.

Btw, it's Juan Pablo Duarte's birthday. Supposedly, today is when the Kenyan ordeal is decided.

Well,
If one does not like the UN, don't accept its help, international aid, or money from the IMF.
Arrange your own affairs.
No-one is forced to participate in the UN or pay for it.
Time for the UN to be reformed in many ways.

As to cholera in Haiti.
The U.N.'s acknowledgement was first reported by the New York Times.

The beginning of the epidemic in Haiti was swift and catastrophic. Here's how Richard Knox described the outbreak for NPR in 2013:

"Suddenly, the first cases appeared in the central highlands near a camp for United Nations peacekeeping forces. ...
"The disease struck with explosive force. Within two days of the first cases, a hospital 60 miles away was admitting a new cholera patient every 3 1/2 minutes.
" 'Part of the reason we think the outbreak grew so quickly was the Haitian population had no immunity to cholera,' says Daniele Lantagne, an environmental engineer at Tufts University. 'Something like when the Europeans brought smallpox to the Americas, and it burned through the native populations.' "
Why The U.N. Is Being Sued Over Haiti's Cholera Epidemic

GOATS AND SODA

Why The U.N. Is Being Sued Over Haiti's Cholera Epidemic

Before 2010, cholera had been unknown in Haiti for at least a century. And the impoverished, earthquake-devastated country was already struggling with water and sanitation.

A panel of experts appointed by the U.N. found that the strain of cholera that popped up in Haiti was "a perfect match" for a strain found in Nepal. Nepalese peacekeepers were staying at the U.N. camp, and poor sanitation sent sewage from the camp into local waterways.

Activists always like to spin facts.
One thing for sure the spread of Cholera was not intentional, nor was the introduction of smallpox to the Americas.

I imagine Nepalese peacekeepers may not be the most advanced and knowledgeable in sanitary management.
Most people have figured out not to have waste facilities close to their kitchens or water sources.

The founding fathers birthday was celebrated with loud praties into the wee hours and a lot of drinking.
It will continue tonight and on Monday.
I doubt much thought is spend on thinking about the reason for the holiday and Duartes accomplishments.
Happy birthday.

Strange how people are hyper critical of human history.
How people want outside help and yet whine about it.
 

windeguy

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Agreed. Just as long as they aren’t from China, Russia or Cuba.
Add North Korea,

Problem is nobody sane will go in to police the situation. Why do something doomed to failure?

Some things cannot be fixed. Haiti is one of those things. People need to admit that.
 

Big

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Add North Korea,

Problem is nobody sane will go in to police the situation. Why do something doomed to failure?

Some things cannot be fixed. Haiti is one of those things. People need to admit that.
add it to the long list of countries that are exercises in futility.