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2dlight

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Jun 3, 2004
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I've just read a very brief article(in Spanish) where the Procuraduria General de La Republica, along with other entities, is having a workshop to combat online child pornography.The word "online" was used five times. My question for those who know is: how does the average non-English-speaking reader pronounce "online" in Spanish?
 

Lucifer

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Jun 26, 2012
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Pornografía por Internet, or child pornography in specific: pornografía infantil

Others prefer to say 'en línea'.
 

Marianopolita

Former Spanish forum Mod 2010-2021
Dec 26, 2003
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I've just read a very brief article(in Spanish) where the Procuraduria General de La Republica, along with other entities, is having a workshop to combat online child pornography.The word "online" was used five times. My question for those who know is: how does the average non-English-speaking reader pronounce "online" in Spanish?


Correct me if I am wrong but I think you are asking how does a Spanish speaker say the word online when it is written in English in a Spanish article. I have yet to hear anyone say it but I would imagine it would be the same way like when they try to pronounce other English words that you hear used in Spanish maybe with an attempt with Spanish phonetics. En línea is the equivalent in Spanish but when Spanish speakers use English words the creativity is limitless. Just think money=moni. Chances are they have their way of saying online.  Oddly enough even in a city like Miami I have never heard it used and if so the person probably speaks some English.  


-MP.
 

2dlight

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Jun 3, 2004
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Correct me if I am wrong but I think you are asking how does a Spanish speaker say the word online when it is written in English in a Spanish article. I have yet to hear anyone say it but I would imagine it would be the same way like when they try to pronounce other English words that you hear used in Spanish maybe with an attempt with Spanish phonetics. En línea is the equivalent in Spanish but when Spanish speakers use English words the creativity is limitless. Just think money=moni. Chances are they have their way of saying online.  Oddly enough even in a city like Miami I have never heard it used and if so the person probably speaks some English.  


-MP.
You are correct. That is exactly what I want to know since I've not heard it either. I hear Wifi pronounced as one would in English but "online" not once. I have heard "estoy conectado/a" though. Thanks for the input.
 

Chirimoya

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Dec 9, 2002
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In Spain wi-fi is pronounced wee-fee and Gmail is khay-mah-eel. :D

In general, online, en línea and digital can be interchangeable, depending on context.
 

Marianopolita

Former Spanish forum Mod 2010-2021
Dec 26, 2003
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You are correct. That is exactly what I want to know since I've not heard it either. I hear Wifi pronounced as one would in English but "online" not once. I have heard "estoy conectado/a" though. Thanks for the input.


I will be listening out now for sure.

One point I wanted to add. In addition to estoy conectado/a as you mentioned. What is also common is the simple estoy en internet. I think that is what I hear the most.

Agreed wifi is said in Spanish as it is in English in my experience or at least in many cities in North America where Spanish is spoken.


-MP.
 

Marianopolita

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In Spain wi-fi is pronounced wee-fee and Gmail is khay-mah-eel. :D

In general, online, en línea and digital can be interchangeable, depending on context.

I think those are examples of the fact that there is less English in Spain.

Wee-fee. I have never heard that in Spanish. The norm is A ver si tienen wifi para conectarnos pronounced the same way as in English. I can already envision the reaction if someone were to say wee-fee on this side of the pond. 


That is technology for you. All these new words in English don’t necessarily follow the tradional rules of pronounciation.



-MP.
 

Chirimoya

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As a rule anglicismos in Spain tend to be pronounced phonetically or adapted. I've been watching Spanish series on Netflix and they definitely do say "wee-fee".

Hamburger is pronounced "jamburguer" or translated to hamburguesa - as opposed to "jamberguer" in Latin America. The term "hot dog" exists but is less common than in Latin America. In Spain it's usually perro caliente.
Donut is pronounced as written (DO-NOOT) or translated to rosquilla, while in Latin America it's pronounced "dona".

Right now I can only think of these food-related examples but I'm sure there are many more from tech.
 

Marianopolita

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As a rule anglicismos in Spain tend to be pronounced phonetically or adapted. I've been watching Spanish series on Netflix and they definitely do say "wee-fee".

Hamburger is pronounced "jamburguer" or translated to hamburguesa - as opposed to "jamberguer" in Latin America. The term "hot dog" exists but is less common than in Latin America. In Spain it's usually perro caliente.
Donut is pronounced as written (DO-NOOT) or translated to rosquilla, while in Latin America it's pronounced "dona".

Right now I can only think of these food-related examples but I'm sure there are many more from tech.


Even without a rule it is obvious there is not much English influence in Spain compared to the US which has a large Spanish market. There are more Spanish speakers in the US than in Spain with approx 41 million. That being said the US is an English nation with a clear unofficial second language needless to go into detail how one language has an impact on the other. Perro caliente for hot dog in my opinion is too literal and just one of the many words that when translated from the source to target language is best left in its original form. Hot dog in English is very common in Latin America. Dona is used in Latin America but even so you need to know where. Many countries have their own way of saying doughnut.  

Spanish is trying to keep up with the tech industry while there are many anglicisms there are phonetic equivalent translated words. For example, tuitearun tuit, un texto although I find speakers just simply say un text. What I like to do is just search for a random tech article in Spanish on the web and read it. You will learn plenty of terms. Anglicisms in technology are fine with me because they are truly new words that have come into the language. What I find more lazy on the speaker’s part is when one anglicizes a word that has an existing Spanish equivalent. For example, in bilingual environments people that say printear instead of the correct word imprimir. It is one thing if you don’t know but to invent a word for no reason does not make sense to me.


-MP.
 

2dlight

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Jun 3, 2004
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I was asked yesterday what "taguea" meant. I asked in what context as I've never heard/seen the word before. The person was watching a video and was being encouraged to click on the "tag" option. Another tech term is "Haz click" and "cliquea" for click. Don't know if this is usage is common. A word used by many Mexicans, in California at least, is  "una troca" for the word truck.
 

Marianopolita

Former Spanish forum Mod 2010-2021
Dec 26, 2003
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I was asked yesterday what "taguea" meant. I asked in what context as I've never heard/seen the word before. The person was watching a video and was being encouraged to click on the "tag" option. Another tech term is "Haz click" and "cliquea" for click. Don't know if this is usage is common. A word used by many Mexicans, in California at least, is  "una troca" for the word truck.

Taguear is new for me but easy to see the origin and it follows the rules of grammar. New verbs of foreign origin or that originate from technology become AR ending verbs or 1st conjugation verb group. Haz click I know, use and hear a lot more than cliquearTroca is official Spanglish said to originate in NYC and surrounding area by the Puerto Rican community. Other vocabulary associated with PR Spanglish is rufoyardajanguear just to name a few. I saw a sign many years ago on an apartment building in Brooklyn- No jangueen meaning No loitering. 


To note NYC Spanglish is different from Miami Spanglish.


-MP.
 

2dlight

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Jun 3, 2004
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Yes MP, I spent 13 years in Washington Heights and experienced first-hand the language contributions of various immigrant groups. My mother worked sewing in the garment district in the early 60's and there were work-specific terms only heard in that environment such as "pisue' " or piece-work: being paid by the unit sewed. That method encouraged the workers to sew at maximum speed to earn more money. Rufo, yarda, janguear were already in vogue then. Here is a challenge; jolop or jolopero are what in English?
 

Chirimoya

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Dec 9, 2002
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Taguear is new for me but easy to see the origin and it follows the rules of grammar. New verbs of foreign origin or that originate from technology become AR ending verbs or 1st conjugation verb group. Haz click I know, use and hear a lot more than cliquear.

To click is also pinchar as in pinchar en el enlace. We're more likely to say hacer (o dar) click en el link.
See also ratón vs. mouse, pronounced "maus" of course.
 

bob saunders

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Jan 1, 2002
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Correct me if I am wrong but I think you are asking how does a Spanish speaker say the word online when it is written in English in a Spanish article. I have yet to hear anyone say it but I would imagine it would be the same way like when they try to pronounce other English words that you hear used in Spanish maybe with an attempt with Spanish phonetics. En línea is the equivalent in Spanish but when Spanish speakers use English words the creativity is limitless. Just think money=moni. Chances are they have their way of saying online.  Oddly enough even in a city like Miami I have never heard it used and if so the person probably speaks some English.  


-MP.

I have heard my wife's secretary say online a number of times and it is pretty close to how an English speakers says it, and she doesnt speak much English, however she doesnt drop letters from the end of words like many Dominicans.
 

Marianopolita

Former Spanish forum Mod 2010-2021
Dec 26, 2003
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To click is also pinchar as in pinchar en el enlace. We're more likely to say hacer (o dar) click en el link.
See also ratón vs. mouse, pronounced "maus" of course.



I think I have seen pinchar in instructions as in pinchar aquí but not often or maybe I am not paying attention. Yes, I have seen both ratón and mouse. 


-MP.
 

Marianopolita

Former Spanish forum Mod 2010-2021
Dec 26, 2003
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Yes MP, I spent 13 years in Washington Heights and experienced first-hand the language contributions of various immigrant groups. My mother worked sewing in the garment district in the early 60's and there were work-specific terms only heard in that environment such as "pisue' " or piece-work: being paid by the unit sewed. That method encouraged the workers to sew at maximum speed to earn more money. Rufo, yarda, janguear were already in vogue then. Here is a challenge; jolop or jolopero are what in English?


I don’t speak Spanglish. I know a few words from what I have seen and heard but in general I don’t speak it. I actually find deciphering it harder than the original world itself. However, it is known to be language among speakers with a common element. Minimum speaking skills in one of the languages thus a way of communication amongst them. Lack of full command of either it depends. I am not sure why Puerto Ricans need to resort to words like janguear coming from a Spanish-speaking island. It just takes a few to get it started and it becomes a form of speech.


Lucifer already posted a response to your question. In my opinion, not easy to decipher jolop yes, jolopero no.


-MP.