Passing through NYC’s “Little DR”

NALs

Economist by Profession
Jan 20, 2003
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Wasn't takin' 'bout pilgrimage.

But I guess you never heard of Greenspan, or Keynes, or Friedman and/or the Chicago Boys from Chile.

If I was interested in economics, I would surely look around Greenspan's childhood neighborhood. Unless you think that WH has always been inhabited by Dominicans only.
The old “trying to show the other that you know what the other is about,” but in reality the opposite is true. It should be a hint why time passes and certain things don’t change despite logic implies it should. Of course, for change to happen, the premise must be spot on. There is no way around that. This is the old “buscar la quinta pata al gato.”

Anyone that participate’s here for a long time has to simply ignore this. Many people here have a need to confirm their own underlying belief, even when that belief is wrong. Food for thought!

Since you appear to be an expert of seeing things that aren’t there, perhaps you know of a normal cat with 5 legs.
 

Lucifer

Silver
Jun 26, 2012
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The old “trying to show the other that you know what the other is about,” but in reality the opposite is true. It should be a hint why time passes and certain things don’t change despite logic implies it should. Of course, for change to happen, the premise must be spot on. There is no way around that. This is the old “buscar la quinta pata al gato.”

Anyone that participate’s here for a long time has to simply ignore this. Many people here have a need to confirm their own underlying belief, even when that belief is wrong. Food for thought!

Since you appear to be an expert of seeing things that aren’t there, perhaps you know of a normal cat with 5 legs.
I'm the first to admit ignorance, sir: I know nothing 'about numbers, economics, investments, or anything to do with complicated subjects.

Carry on.
 

bachata

Aprendiz de todo profesional de nada
Aug 18, 2007
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That place hasn’t changed much in one year, well at least passing through is almost the same. lol

Looks a lot better than last time I passed though 😔

JJ
 

NALs

Economist by Profession
Jan 20, 2003
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Gentrification is going full blast and there are many new high rise towers going up for, let's just say, people who don't already live up here "In the Heights." It will be unrecognizable in 3 years. This is the final frontier in MN.
Maybe it’s going that route, but recently I made a last minute decision to go to Yonkers (was in Bronxville) to see how much it has changed. I went there once a long time ago and the fact I intentionally never went back should be a hint of how much I “liked” the place. Much is the same, but on the riverfront there are many highrises and businesses such as restaurants that were not there the first time I went. They also have a sort of malecón or boardwalk. Everything looks new and nicely done. I thought I would never say that Yonkers was going places other than down the drain, but I was pleasantly surprised with everything I saw there. Even slightly away from the riverfront there are new buildings that have gone up and others in the process of construction. A new movie studios is partly built (already is huge) and they aren’t done expanding. There are banners on Yonkers Ave that say “Yonkers is Hollywood on Hudson.” Once completed it will be the largest movie studios in the eas coast of the USA. The changes I witnessed in Yonkers riverfront and vicinity simply blew me away.

Another detail I noticed¡, and this could be related to what might happen with the gentrification in Washington Heights and Inwood, is that when I first went there it was obvious it has a large African American and Latino communities (then it had a lot of Dominicans too and it has only increased since then.) Usually, when gentrification happens in an area that before had many African Americans and/or Latinos is that those groups viaibly diminish as the newcomers increase. In Yonkers the impression that I got is that much of the riverfront was gentrified but there is still a mass of African Americans and Latinos dominating there. The boardwalk, which was at sunset, had many people and most from one of those 2 groups. I also got the impression many, if not most, of the people living in those nice buildinga are AA’s and/or Latinos. I also noticed who was driving and as passengers in the many nice vehicles and SUVs and more often than not, AA’s and/or Latinos. Even saw a few with the little Dominican flag hanging from their mirrors above the dashboards as they can be clealy seen through the windshields. The same with the restaurants, it was obvious who dominated those scenes dimpky by looking around.

Things apoear to be different there and Washington Heights/Inwood isn’t far. In fact, from the boardwalk sone of the skyline of NYC is visible as well as the George Washington Bridge. You know what that means.

Next to the end of the boardwalk I nitice a big industrial complete with chimneys which was hard to avoid. It turns out it belongs to Domino Sugar. Where do they get much of their sugar? La Romana.
 

NALs

Economist by Profession
Jan 20, 2003
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Does Haverstraw, NY still has the greatest concentration of Dominicans in the USA?

Parts of Haverstraw may be an extension of Santiago. lol Arrive in downtown and what’s the first thing you see? A Dominican flag in a window. The Santiago Monument as the logo of one business here, Quisqueya Sports Club in another place there… Plus, you also hear people speaking (and screaming) Spanish… Dominican Spanish. Dominican music heard from here and from there.

One thing I really liked about this place is that everywhere the streets are super clean, not even a little paper is found on the side of the road.

Also, there are a few tight streets and the houses are practically on the road as found in many Dominican towns and a mountainous backdrop. That day was hot, partly cloudy with some clouds with their own drizzling/rain. Guess what that mean? If it wasn’t for the architecture of the buildings, I would had no problems thinking it was Puerto Plata. lol I can see why many Dominicans gravitate to that town. At least in the summer, it’s as close to the DR as you will get in New York. The only thing missing as the large number of motos.

Don’t think the whole area looks like that. In nearby municipalities there are the typical single family homes with a front yard neighborhoods including the newer ones.

The entrance to Haverstraw is amazing.


 

NALs

Economist by Profession
Jan 20, 2003
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Before someone thinks “I’m going there for the day,” there are no passenger train connection (cargo only), so scratch that option. There is a ferry but I think they only go across the river, not to NYC. Basically, the only way to get there is driving (or Uber and such.) Once there, there is basically nothing to see. Unless you know someone that lives there and will be visiting them or simply getting to know a place for the place, not many more reasons to visit.

Bear Mountain is a few miles north of there and can be reached in a few minutes, so my suggestion is your goal should be to visit Bear Mountain and since Haverstraw is along the way, make a quick detour into town. It isn’t rundown nor rich. Overall a nice town in a great setting that just happen to have a lot of Dominican influence to be noticeable without much effort. I have no idea on the safety level, but seem quite safe during the day. I can’t imagine it would be different at night, but who knows.

The drive there along 9W from the south and the north are quite scenic too.