Penalty Fees for Violators of Employing and Housing Illegal Immigrants

Caonabo

LIFE IS GOOD
Sep 27, 2017
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Believe what you wish. I doubt there is understanding.

I post what is in the news. You infer from that.

I am not one to believe things that are spoon fed to me.
I prefer to look at life in reality.
Preferably sticking with historical contexts of such.
 

Caonabo

LIFE IS GOOD
Sep 27, 2017
7,339
2,945
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I'm beginning to think a person needs to know Spanish to get it. How can anyone here miss that is beyond comprehension.

Furthermore, there are differences that are noticeable between how certain issues are presented here and how the same issues are presented in spheres dominated by Dominicans. Often its as if they are two different actions that are incompatible, as if they are two different things. For example, its somewhat common for people in this forum to refer to society as one of "Dominicans and Haitians" and that's a glaring difference with how Dominicans see it. If attention is placed on estimated population, Haitians and Haitian-Dominicans doesn't amount to more than 10% of the population in the most liberal of cases. That begs the question that if Dominicans make up the vast majority of the population and technically the DR should be presented as a society of "Dominicans" by the fact that they make a relative and an absolute majority by a long shot, why is it that in this website, which is one of the few about the DR where most participants are not ethnic Dominicans, the society is often presented of one made up of "Dominicans and Haitians?" Doesn't that gives the impression that Dominicans and Haitians are at a similar population level in society?

It could be, and this is quite possible, that expats give the impression of being concentrated in certain touristic areas on the coast and ironically those tend to be the areas where the Haitian presence is among the highest as a percentage of the population, but Dominican society isn't concentrated in tourist areas. That reality of expats in tourist areas is being expressed here based on their perception. It could also be the case that among expats its much more common than among the Dominican society at large to have contact with Haitians as maids, gardeners, etc on a much more frequent basis and this too can affect certain perceptions.

I guess its similar to what I noticed many years ago, could be decades, that it was much more common in this website to think (or at least it gave that impression) that expats had a much greater impact on Dominican society and were even considered by Dominicans given their perceived pressence in circles of power, when in fact expats are never thought of or even met by the vast majority of Dominicans. Places like Sosúa or Las Terrenas, where expats have a greater influence, aren't the norm. The typical vast majority of the DR, and particularly where most Dominicans live, expats are basically invinsible given how tiny it's in absolute terms and due to that their influence in things such as local governments is negligible.

It's a difference in outlook that is quite telling to the very least. It's almost a difference by language. If its a medium in Spanish then the Haitian issue is treated on a much smaller scale than if its a medium about the DR and/or Dominicans that's done in English. It's a very noticeable difference. It's also true that mediums about the DR done in English the typical participant isn't Dominican and a sizable number doesn't even know Spanish except a few words while mediums done in Spanish tend to be dominated by Dominicans and expats are almost absent. That too could explain the differences of perspective. In either case, its as if these are two extremely different DR's as oppose to discussing about the same country.

The whole presence of Haiti and Haitians in general tends to be much greater in websites about the DR done in English than in websites about the DR done in Spanish. This difference is quite telling in another way, there is a sub-forum here dedicated to Haiti while there isn't one in Dominican dominated mediums and there isn't one about the DR in Haitian dominated mediums. Dominicans and Dominican issues are not as present in Haitian mediums, and Haitians and Haitian issues aren't as present in Dominican mediums as Haitians/Haitian issues are present here, a medium not dominated by either Dominicans or Haitians and conducted in English.

Lastly, its also noticeable that the whole concept revolving race, identity, and of that nature are more problematic, more a focus of attention (when allowed), and outright prohibited in mediums about the DR that are not conducted in Spanish and most of the participants aren't Dominicans than in Spanish-language Dominican dominated mediums where its often not an issue, not a focus of attention, and also not prohibited. Why is that? In general, mediums in English about the DR are dominated by Americans and the USA-based way of seeing many things in general could explain these differences, but it still remains a mistery.

🙌 THIS! THIS! THIS! 🙌

This should be a header affixed to the top of this very web forum, for those that seemingly do not understand.
Thank you for so eloquently presenting these Matter of Facts!
 

Mr Deal HD

Member
Sep 11, 2019
91
23
8
Furthermore, there are differences that are noticeable between how certain issues are presented here and how the same issues are presented in spheres dominated by Dominicans. Often its as if they are two different actions that are incompatible, as if they are two different things. For example, its somewhat common for people in this forum to refer to society as one of "Dominicans and Haitians" and that's a glaring difference with how Dominicans see it. If attention is placed on estimated population, Haitians and Haitian-Dominicans doesn't amount to more than 10% of the population in the most liberal of cases. That begs the question that if Dominicans make up the vast majority of the population and technically the DR should be presented as a society of "Dominicans" by the fact that they make a relative and an absolute majority by a long shot, why is it that in this website, which is one of the few about the DR where most participants are not ethnic Dominicans, the society is often presented of one made up of "Dominicans and Haitians?" Doesn't that gives the impression that Dominicans and Haitians are at a similar population level in society?

It could be, and this is quite possible, that expats give the impression of being concentrated in certain touristic areas on the coast and ironically those tend to be the areas where the Haitian presence is among the highest as a percentage of the population, but Dominican society isn't concentrated in tourist areas. That reality of expats in tourist areas is being expressed here based on their perception. It could also be the case that among expats its much more common than among the Dominican society at large to have contact with Haitians as maids, gardeners, etc on a much more frequent basis and this too can affect certain perceptions.

I guess its similar to what I noticed many years ago, could be decades, that it was much more common in this website to think (or at least it gave that impression) that expats had a much greater impact on Dominican society and were even considered by Dominicans given their perceived pressence in circles of power, when in fact expats are never thought of or even met by the vast majority of Dominicans. Places like Sosúa or Las Terrenas, where expats have a greater influence, aren't the norm. The typical vast majority of the DR, and particularly where most Dominicans live, expats are basically invinsible given how tiny it's in absolute terms and due to that their influence in things such as local governments is negligible.

It's a difference in outlook that is quite telling to the very least. It's almost a difference by language. If its a medium in Spanish then the Haitian issue is treated on a much smaller scale than if its a medium about the DR and/or Dominicans that's done in English. It's a very noticeable difference. It's also true that mediums about the DR done in English the typical participant isn't Dominican and a sizable number doesn't even know Spanish except a few words while mediums done in Spanish tend to be dominated by Dominicans and expats are almost absent. That too could explain the differences of perspective. In either case, its as if these are two extremely different DR's as oppose to discussing about the same country.

The whole presence of Haiti and Haitians in general tends to be much greater in websites about the DR done in English than in websites about the DR done in Spanish. This difference is quite telling in another way, there is a sub-forum here dedicated to Haiti while there isn't one in Dominican dominated mediums and there isn't one about the DR in Haitian dominated mediums. Dominicans and Dominican issues are not as present in Haitian mediums, and Haitians and Haitian issues aren't as present in Dominican mediums as Haitians/Haitian issues are present here, a medium not dominated by either Dominicans or Haitians and conducted in English.

Lastly, its also noticeable that the whole concept revolving race, identity, and of that nature are more problematic, more a focus of attention (when allowed), and outright prohibited in mediums about the DR that are not conducted in Spanish and most of the participants aren't Dominicans than in Spanish-language Dominican dominated mediums where its often not an issue, not a focus of attention, and also not prohibited. Why is that? In general, mediums in English about the DR are dominated by Americans and the USA-based way of seeing many things in general could explain these differences, but it still remains a mistery.
I wish I could give a standing ovation for this.
 
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windeguy

Platinum
Jul 10, 2004
36,327
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I am not one to believe things that are spoon fed to me.
I prefer to look at life in reality.
Preferably sticking with historical contexts of such.
Here is one for the history books. The very corrupt PLD is history. The PRM is in power. What does that mean? TIme will tell, they wrote the immigration laws.
 

windeguy

Platinum
Jul 10, 2004
36,327
2,728
113
And yet no one is addressing the issue of how Haitians are entering the country in the first place.;)
Are all illegals considered a problem❓As William Webster so eloquently put it:

Mike Drop‼️
🤣
Illegals have been considered a problem for years, At least since i moved here in 2003. What has been done has varied over time.
Keep an eye out on the north coast for the big busses with MIGRACION painted on them over the next weeks and months.
 

Yourmaninvegas

I am here to protect and serve
Feb 16, 2016
1,150
434
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In a ideal world all laws should be applied equally. But we all know that there is discretion in every part of the criminal justice system in every country. From the police, to the prosecutors to the judge. Each and every case is decided by human being that has the discretion to send it to the next phase of the process or file it in the circular bin.

PN rolled up on a brother while I was out exercising.
No mask. 😷
Bad man? Yes.
Law violator? Yes❗
Señor policeman asked me where my mask was.
I pulled it out. Put it on.
Señor policeman gave me a lecture.
I apologized for being a bad gringo.
Stated how I had utmost respect for the laws of his country.
He sent me on my way.

What does it mean?
Gringo privilege or a Policeman at the end of his shift and ready to go home?
I don't know.
Do you❓
 

Garyexpat

Bronze
Sep 7, 2012
2,088
722
113
In a ideal world all laws should be applied equally. But we all know that there is discretion in every part of the criminal justice system in every country. From the police, to the prosecutors to the judge. Each and every case is decided by human being that has the discretion to send it to the next phase of the process or file it in the circular bin.

PN rolled up on a brother while I was out exercising.
No mask. 😷
Bad man? Yes.
Law violator? Yes❗
Señor policeman asked me where my mask was.
I pulled it out. Put it on.
Señor policeman gave me a lecture.
I apologized for being a bad gringo.
Stated how I had utmost respect for the laws of his country.
He sent me on my way.

What does it mean?
Gringo privilege or a Policeman at the end of his shift and ready to go home?
I don't know.
Do you❓
I don't know where you were but it seems that there is a "hands off" attitude for tourist areas. I was in Sosua for a few weeks before I left for a 12 midnight curfew in Cartagena and I can tell you that many, including myself rarely wore a mask walking around Sosua and at the beach it was life as always, people eating, drinking, dancing and not only did almost none of the people wear masks or social distance but probably half the cops patrolling were not wearing masks. I couldn't take the draconian curfews so I am now enjoying a curfew that very livable for me. (I still recent having a curfew but much better than 5 during the week and 12 on weekends).
 

Yourmaninvegas

I am here to protect and serve
Feb 16, 2016
1,150
434
83
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I don't know where you were but it seems that there is a "hands off" attitude for tourist areas.
I do not live in a tourist area. But thanks for the information. Everyone has a choice. It only confirms my point.
AND
Each and every case is decided by a human being that has the discretion to send it to the next phase of the process or file it in the circular bin.
 
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NanSanPedro

Nickel with tin plating
Apr 12, 2019
3,066
2,450
113
I don't know where you were but it seems that there is a "hands off" attitude for tourist areas. I was in Sosua for a few weeks before I left for a 12 midnight curfew in Cartagena and I can tell you that many, including myself rarely wore a mask walking around Sosua and at the beach it was life as always, people eating, drinking, dancing and not only did almost none of the people wear masks or social distance but probably half the cops patrolling were not wearing masks. I couldn't take the draconian curfews so I am now enjoying a curfew that very livable for me. (I still recent having a curfew but much better than 5 during the week and 12 on weekends).
I think you're right. In Boca Chica, I never wear a mask when I'm walking and I walk at least 3 hours outside each day. I never get hassled. Right now, I would get there is between 70 - 80% compliance with the masks on outside, although the majority of those are worn without covering the nose. I do still see moto people with masks on and no helmets. Serious chuckle time.

Anecdote in the bus station in Punta Cana this past Tuesday. A Dominicana had her mask full on over her mouth and nose sitting 2 seats away from me. She removed it to cough. I tried hard not to laugh.
 

Challenger007

New member
Nov 2, 2020
18
5
3
Springfield, Illinois
I think you're right. In Boca Chica, I never wear a mask when I'm walking and I walk at least 3 hours outside each day. I never get hassled. Right now, I would get there is between 70 - 80% compliance with the masks on outside, although the majority of those are worn without covering the nose. I do still see moto people with masks on and no helmets. Serious chuckle time.

Anecdote in the bus station in Punta Cana this past Tuesday. A Dominicana had her mask full on over her mouth and nose sitting 2 seats away from me. She removed it to cough. I tried hard not to laugh.

This is where the problem lies. Nobody informed the population about how to wear masks correctly (including that if you cough, you should not take off your mask). As a result, we have today an absolutely absurd situation, when everyone does what he wants, when there is no uniform order and protocol of behavior. Maybe, of course, this is all there is, but it is not observed and is perceived informally.
 

PICHARDO

One Dominican at a time, please!
May 15, 2003
13,246
853
113
Santiago de Los 30 Caballeros
Already seen the enforcement of the new directives in action here in Santiago.
A construction company got fined because they stopped a company vehicle with undocumented Haitian workers that stated they worked for the company and had daily records of their jobs on them. These are kept to get paid for their jobs at the company.

Another had his Haitian workers detained and was fined for the illegal hiring.

The third one was fined because all the people in his rental unit had no legal documents on them after a 911 call for a disorder at the unit.

Needless to say all Haitians got arrested and sent to be the deported at Dajabon.

Fines aren’t cheap and re-visits are ongoing to confirm compliance.

It’s happening...

I’m just amazed the low key way these things are happening now. No mentions on news or media. Only you know if by chance or present.
 
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Yourmaninvegas

I am here to protect and serve
Feb 16, 2016
1,150
434
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Already seen the enforcement of the new directives in action here in Santiago.
A construction company got fined because they stopped a company vehicle with undocumented Haitian workers that stated they worked for the company and had daily records of their jobs on them. These are kept to get paid for their jobs at the company.

Another had his Haitian workers detained and was fined for the illegal hiring.

The third one was fined because all the people in his rental unit had no legal documents on them after a 911 call for a disorder at the unit.

Needless to say all Haitians got arrested and sent to be the deported at Dajabon.

Fines aren’t cheap and re-visits are ongoing to confirm compliance.

It’s happening...

I’m just amazed the low key way these things are happening now. No mentions on news or media. Only you know if by chance or present.
An enforcement action with a focus on being effective is about locking people up and generating fines
Not headlines.