Pier construction near Sosúa by the Sea

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Cdn_Gringo

Guest
Clearly no hydraulic engineers were consulted before that project was built. Typical. It'll just be a place for people to rip the bottoms out of their yolas soon. Time to update the marine hazards map...
 
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Ecoman1949

Guest
Clearly no hydraulic engineers were consulted before that project was built. Typical. It'll just be a place for people to rip the bottoms out of their yolas soon. Time to update the marine hazards map...
We digitally mapped every section of shoreline on Canada’s East, and West coast, sections of the Arctic, and the Canadian section of the Great Lakes. The maps are used for coastal development, oil spill contingency planning, shoreline impact monitoring, etc. They list man made( anthropogenic) structures and natural formations including headlands, all types of beaches, and sensitive species as well as their habitat. The have real time video linked to the section of coastline your viewing. The template for all this is easily transferable to the DR and I have no doubt the Canadian government would be favourable to the proposal. The DR military choppers could be used to video the entire shoreline and the rest of the data could be collected by students working on their masters or doctorate environmental degrees. I know this is pie in the sky and sometimes the data would stand in the way of tourism development infrastructure, but it might allow for mitigation procedures to minimize the impacts.
 
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visitante

Guest
I was amazed when I saw the beach in front of Lifestyles in Cabarete. They certainly didn’t get the best frontage for the money they invested. They are hoping to access some adjacent property and gain a bit more frontage. They are also negotiating with other adjacent properties to get more parking space for their clients.

Cabarete Beach is not protected from the long term impacts of storms and high wind and wave conditions. It’s open to the ocean and waves started by the wind and tide conditions have ample opportunity to build up and gain massive power because of the open fetch. Stronger storm surges and hurricanes are becoming the norm so we can expect bigger impacts over short periods. Building massive breakwaters, gabion walls, and installing armour stone are temporary fixes and, in many cases, create worse problems. Ultimately nature will determine the quality of the shoreline in the Cabarete area.
Lifestyles has not shown much interest in acquiring adjacent properties, and even if and when they go in that direction it would give them more frontage without more beach. They have been kicking around the idea of a massive breakwater going from the existing but broken up breakwater in front of Velero Beach resort then continuing in an arc along the top of the dead reef. Like the one in Sosua discussed in this thread one can be assured that there will be no serious environmental impact study and no public hearing (vista pública). Acquiring the properties between their location and Velero would make sense only in the context of a workable solution to the erosion problem.
 
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ljmesg

Guest
I was amazed when I saw the beach in front of Lifestyles in Cabarete. They certainly didn’t get the best frontage for the money they invested. They are hoping to access some adjacent property and gain a bit more frontage. They are also negotiating with other adjacent properties to get more parking space for their clients.

Cabarete Beach is not protected from the long term impacts of storms and high wind and wave conditions. It’s open to the ocean and waves started by the wind and tide conditions have ample opportunity to build up and gain massive power because of the open fetch. Stronger storm surges and hurricanes are becoming the norm so we can expect bigger impacts over short periods. Building massive breakwaters, gabion walls, and installing armour stone are temporary fixes and, in many cases, create worse problems. Ultimately nature will determine the quality of the shoreline in the Cabarete area.
Properly built Gabion walls and breakwaters are hardly temporary fixes.
 
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Ecoman1949

Guest
Properly built Gabion walls and breakwaters are hardly temporary fixes.
You would think so but I’ve seen the impact of major storms on these structures. I’ve seen everything from partial failure to complete destruction. I’ve seen armour stone displaced or buried as well. Concrete piers blown to bits. Granted they last longer than some protection methods, but time and tide eventually take a toll on them. Some require constant maintenance, others get replaced with new structures. I’ve seen a massive railway trestle bridge loaded down with rail cars filled with fertilizer, completely washed away and sunk by the force of river water combined with ice. Even seeing a growing weed pushing up through asphalt reminds me of nature’s ability to restore itself despite what we do.
 
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Big

Guest
many tourist beaches on the east coast of the U.S, pay to have sand piped in from off shore only to repeat the same procedure in 6 to 10 years. There is a special ship that sucks the sand and ocean floor up into the ship and pumps in onto the beach. There is a dozer and loader waiting to spread to sand. It creates this course beach, not walking friendly. I saw this in Maryland, will never go back. The cost would be prohibitive to do here but it does protect beach real estate.
 
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Uzin

Guest
For a week now the combination of high tide and wind direction has caused big waves on Sosua beach/bay, unfortunately that resulted in a lot of sands to wash away, the Charamicos end now hardly has a beach... ! The waves were basically battering the walls and if it continues it could also damage the wall and threaten the bars/restaurant behind it...

I just hope the conditions change quickly or half of Sosua beach could be washed away.....
 
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Ecoman1949

Guest
Is this a haiku?
Hola Meems. Thanks for my morning chuckle. Nice to know your gimlet eye is as sharp as ever. Hope your enjoying your new digs. There is some truth and insight in thompstr’s post. If the breakwater is massive enough and proves stable, someone is going to get the urge to build a tourist trap on it because it’s easily accessible from the land side. As they say, if you build it they will come and Sosua needs new tourist attractions. Btw, love the impact Atwood’s books are having worldwide. Take care.
 
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windeguy

Guest
many tourist beaches on the east coast of the U.S, pay to have sand piped in from off shore only to repeat the same procedure in 6 to 10 years. There is a special ship that sucks the sand and ocean floor up into the ship and pumps in onto the beach. There is a dozer and loader waiting to spread to sand. It creates this course beach, not walking friendly. I saw this in Maryland, will never go back. The cost would be prohibitive to do here but it does protect beach real estate.
This was done several years ago on Cabarete beach. The sand comes, the sand goes.
 
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Ecoman1949

Guest
This was done several years ago on Cabarete beach. The sand comes, the sand goes.
Like political promises and new pavement during a DR election. Both are guaranteed to disappear quickly. Some things do reappear over time. Every time I fly down I get a right side window seat to check out the outer banks islands off the Carolinas. They are slowly coming back after the last major hurricane.
 
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DR Solar

Guest
The pier and new beach are over 50% gone with the high surf last week. I just saw the photos while talking with someone in the know. Over U.S. 2M got washed away in one event that was not even considered big.

This is NOT a Marriott property but rather would be a Marriott managed and name property. It's a franchise and not Marriott owned. (This is also the case for the other 2 projects mentioned.) If the owner can not fulfill the standards and promises (such as a beach), Marriott will pull out.

Surfs up again this PM. Bye Bye the rest of the beach and pier.
 
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DR Solar

Guest
As for the river property... It ain't gonna happen with too much that they want to to that clearly can not be done. Cab. is unknown. The Dominican developers are big boys... but Ain't gonna happen.

Unless the put get get to the U.S.. $100's of millions. For a wall in Sosua and a marina basin next to a river that's on a flood zone on a protected river area.
 
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DR Solar

Guest
Just a little problem with that. The sand comes via truck. The sand goes... Where? That's the problem
 
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chico bill

Guest
The pier and new beach are over 50% gone with the high surf last week. I just saw the photos while talking with someone in the know. Over U.S. 2M got washed away in one event that was not even considered big.

This is NOT a Marriott property but rather would be a Marriott managed and name property. It's a franchise and not Marriott owned. (This is also the case for the other 2 projects mentioned.) If the owner can not fulfill the standards and promises (such as a beach), Marriott will pull out.

Surfs up again this PM. Bye Bye the rest of the beach and pier.
Because they used rock that can stand up to water and erosion - it will all be gone by December
 
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Big

Guest
I guess the Ritz Carlton someone said is on the fast track, is now going to be another cabana
 
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Ecoman1949

Guest
Just a little problem with that. The sand comes via truck. The sand goes... Where? That's the problem
The sand gets transported by subsurface currents along the coastline. Some people may actually benefit temporarily from the appearance of sand lens type dunes along their beaches but they are mobile and come and go with the tides. The big issue is long term deposition on the coral beds just off the beach. Persistent sand deposition will eventually smother the coral which, as living organisms need oxygen to survive. It’s a slow process but it can happen. Also benthic organisms living in the sediment in the intertidal zone gets impacted by the loss or deposition of large amounts of sedimentary material such as sand. Once the sand goes, it’s basically a crapshoot.
 
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DR Solar

Guest
The sand gets transported by subsurface currents along the coastline. Some people may actually benefit temporarily from the appearance of sand lens type dunes along their beaches but they are mobile and come and go with the tides. The big issue is long term deposition on the coral beds just off the beach. Persistent sand deposition will eventually smother the coral which, as living organisms need oxygen to survive. It’s a slow process but it can happen. Also benthic organisms living in the sediment in the intertidal zone gets impacted by the loss or deposition of large amounts of sedimentary material such as sand. Once the sand goes, it’s basically a crapshoot.
Exactly. We have been watching this happen and new shallows have appeared that effect the ocean swells; making them break further out and become stronger hitting the shore harder with erosion effects much deeper inland.
 

JDJones

Moderator - Covid 19 in DR & North Coast
Jan 7, 2016
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I added this thread to my calendar with a reminder to check back in a year.

It will be interesting to see how this progresses
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And here we are, 1 year later. Popped up in my reminders today.


Who can tell us what has happened with the Artificial pier/beach?

I'd love to see some recent pictures :giggle:
 
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