Porsche questions - importation into the DR, maintenance of car in the DR

CristoRey

On Vacation
Apr 1, 2014
7,503
3,583
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Opinions vary and we've pretty much beaten this horse to death. Do you. Me, I'll do what I think is best and imagine you will to.
I agree.
The fella's lived here a long time
and knows how things work. I hope he
gets to bring one down and doesn't
have any problems when driving it here.
 

william webster

Platinum
Jan 16, 2009
26,618
2,145
113
Well - looky - looky

You'd have to know where I live to really appreciate this..... campo , un poco
Up my steep hill,. past my gate.....a Maserati... the SUV model........this afternoon

Couldn't believe my eyes.....

A Porsche is a nuisance bug compared to this marque.....and I own a P-car in NoAmerica
There is no comparison

Anyway..... OP - Buy away but I would buy here
Keeps your warranty intact for starters....
Export and you lose it..... talking BIG $$$ here
 
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PICHARDO

One Dominican at a time, please!
May 15, 2003
13,246
853
113
Santiago de Los 30 Caballeros
Well - looky - looky

You'd have to know where I live to really appreciate this..... campo , un poco
Up my steep hill,. past my gate.....a Maserati... the SUV model........this afternoon

Couldn't believe my eyes.....

A Porsche is a nuisance bug compared to this marque.....and I own a P-car in NoAmerica
There is no comparison

Anyway..... OP - Buy away but I would buy here
Keeps your warranty intact for starters....
Export and you lose it..... talking BIG $$$ here

Reason why I decided NOT to import my cars here. Not even the practical ones...

The classic was not worth the hassle and paperwork, pleading with the classic car association here and paying what was to me a repurchase of a car I had already paid for a long time ago.

Exotic and expensive rides without a warranty in the DR is looking for a problem you don’t want or need. After all, we buy cars to enjoy the rides or for a purpose.

I find warranties here well balanced and appropriate to the reality of our country.

When was the last time you rode your sports car 🚗 on a flooded street? Here that’s a common topic, not the exception.

I think a sport suv 🚙 is the right ticket for the DR streets. So far my eyes get tired looking at so many Range Rovers cruising up and down all day long here. Very few in garage shops...

High-end rim repair shops have a steady flow of sporty car owners, in and out every day of the week here.

Sometimes you take a turn on a corner to a side street, that looks more that you’ll need a goat rather than a car to climb it.
 
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JD Jones

Moderator - Covid 19 in DR & North Coast
Jan 7, 2016
4,544
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I had a Land Rover once. So much to love... and hate. Even routine maintenance was enough to give me a heart attack. Big bucks at the dealer.
They did some engine work for me and it took me a few days to get the money over here from my stateside account.
When I went to pick it up, they sent to me the holding yard where they keep vehicles waiting to be repaired or repaired and waiting for the owner to pick it up. It took them about 10 minutes to find mine because there was close to a hundred vehicles in there.
Do a search for Range Rovers on supercarros or FB marketplace. Tons of them - many because the owner couldn't afford the maintenance.
 

PICHARDO

One Dominican at a time, please!
May 15, 2003
13,246
853
113
Santiago de Los 30 Caballeros
Just now at scotia bank jpd
 

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Mr Deal HD

Member
Sep 11, 2019
91
23
8
Why do you say that? I've owned two Porsches here and still have one. Never had any unwanted attention. In fact I get a lot of positive comments about my 968 as it is the only one in the DR as far as I know.

I too would evade the main stealers in this country. I buy most of my parts off eBay, Pelican Parts and DC automotive from the US and ship them over. I do all my maintenance myself as a hobby.
Most of the posters live on tight budgets, know nothing of the DR other than the small, poor areas they traverse, or are old folks that are stuck in their assumptions. There’s also the envious type like Michael lurking as well.

Santo Domingo is loaded with luxury vehicles. Lamborghinis, Ferraris, Porsches (mostly driven by the ladies), Mclarens, Maseratis, etc. And now the Rolls Royce Cullinan is the new trend.
 

william webster

Platinum
Jan 16, 2009
26,618
2,145
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Driving the Jamao to Moca road one time.....very curvy stretch...

A Bentley 2-door (big engine one) blistered me on a turn..... dangerously !
I see cars like that on the new toll road doing waaaay mover 100mph......

Right... the country is full of fancy cars
Baseball players, rich Doms.........drug lords.......

Don't you remember Big Papi - got shot for oogling a drug lord's former - former - girlfriend
Papi had a RR.... was buying the chica a Jeepeta.....

They tried to hit him 'below the belt'....... gunshots

Look it up....
there's a great video..... the girlfriend & Papi's sister - catfight
Papi's wife lives in FLA
This GF is NOT the intended recipient of the Jeepeta....... gets a bit confusing, the story
 
Jan 9, 2004
9,662
874
113
I had a Land Rover once. So much to love... and hate. Even routine maintenance was enough to give me a heart attack. Big bucks at the dealer.
They did some engine work for me and it took me a few days to get the money over here from my stateside account.
When I went to pick it up, they sent to me the holding yard where they keep vehicles waiting to be repaired or repaired and waiting for the owner to pick it up. It took them about 10 minutes to find mine because there was close to a hundred vehicles in there.
Do a search for Range Rovers on supercarros or FB marketplace. Tons of them - many because the owner couldn't afford the maintenance.

Consistently rated some of the worst/least reliable...........the only thing people are really getting for their money is the badge/ supposed prestge............and of course, lots of tow/maintenance bills.

Its a bling country...................no matter your social status......................and you know that for sure when people spend crazy money to put expensive wheels on a late 90's Corolla/Honda.

Too each their own.


Respectfully,
Playacaribe2
 

NALs

Polls Forum Moderator
Jan 20, 2003
10,258
999
113
Most of the posters live on tight budgets, know nothing of the DR other than the small, poor areas they traverse, or are old folks that are stuck in their assumptions. There’s also the envious type like Michael lurking as well.

Santo Domingo is loaded with luxury vehicles. Lamborghinis, Ferraris, Porsches (mostly driven by the ladies), Mclarens, Maseratis, etc. And now the Rolls Royce Cullinan is the new trend.
I think its MasterCard that does an annual (don't know if they did it this year due to Covid) of high net worth individuals. It's a very conservative study since it doesn't includes drug dealers and other types that keep a low profile. The DR ranks the highest among small countries in the region and only places like Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, etc surpass it. If anything, its very safe tomsay the DR is probably the country in Latin America with the most millionaires on a per square kilometer basis. The only thing keeping the DR from surpassing places like Mexico or Brazil is size, but none of those countries march the DR on the amount of millionaires per square kilometer.

It's a major reason why seeing top luxury cars isn't as rare in Dominican streets, particularly in Santo Domingo. I take it that unless a car is a Porsche or Maserati type, these cars can zip by someone and they wouldn't notice. Oh sure, now they will notice because they are aware of them and on the lookout while on Dominican streets and fsir enough, they will see them. But it wasn't as if these cars now appear out of the blue, they were always there. Its you who was asleep regarding this. lol
 

Mr Deal HD

Member
Sep 11, 2019
91
23
8
I think its MasterCard that does an annual (don't know if they did it this year due to Covid) of high net worth individuals. It's a very conservative study since it doesn't includes drug dealers and other types that keep a low profile. The DR ranks the highest among small countries in the region and only places like Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, etc surpass it. If anything, its very safe tomsay the DR is probably the country in Latin America with the most millionaires on a per square kilometer basis. The only thing keeping the DR from surpassing places like Mexico or Brazil is size, but none of those countries march the DR on the amount of millionaires per square kilometer.

Its a major reason why seeing top luxury cars isn't as rare in Dominican streets, particularly in Santo Domingo.
It’s the reason I’m incorporating several new ventures in the DR at this moment. The DR has the fastest growing economy in all of Latin America and the Caribbean with an average of 4%-5% growth per annum. In 2017 alone there was a growth of 7%-9%. Those intelligent enough to invest in their economy (the right investments, not real estate) the past 5 years have seen unbelievable dividends to attest to this.

It’s helpful that most people still assume the DR is a poor country though, as it leaves a lot of venture opportunities for those of us intelligent enough to research pass the rumors and uneducated hearsay. My initial investment there before the pandemic was less than 5 figures. If I were to tell you share participation in that same venture has just surpassed the 7 figure mark this month, you’d laugh at me as I laugh all the way to the bank. 😂
 

NALs

Polls Forum Moderator
Jan 20, 2003
10,258
999
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It’s the reason I’m incorporating several new ventures in the DR at this moment. The DR has the fastest growing economy in all of Latin America and the Caribbean with an average of 4%-5% growth per annum. In 2017 alone there was a growth of 7%-9%. Those intelligent enough to invest in their economy (the right investments, not real estate) the past 5 years have seen unbelievable dividends to attest to this.

It’s helpful that most people still assume the DR is a poor country though, as it leaves a lot of venture opportunities for those of us intelligent enough to research pass the rumors and uneducated hearsay. My initial investment there before the pandemic was less than 5 figures. If I were to tell you share participation in that same venture has just surpassed the 7 figure mark this month, you’d laugh at me as I laugh all the way to the bank. 😂
That's what I say. By the time most people see the DR as at a higher level than that, it will be too late to get into many business sectors. It's still a developing country, so there are many sectors that either haven't been developed yet or are beginning to be developed, leaving the space wide open for new companies to grow and become leaders in those sectors. Many of those sectors have been developed in North America or Europe, so reinventing the wheel is not quite required, though some tweeking certainly is there are certain things of Dominican culture that will get in the way of success versus how its done entirely in say the USA.

With that said, there are certain things that makes the DR appear poorer than it is to people that may not be (or don't want to be) well acquainted with the DR in reality.

For example, street vendors on several major intersections in the cities. Many may not notice that by this time most are Haitian migrants, many of them illegals. What would happen to street vendors if the border was better controlled? Exactly, that isn't an indication of the level of development in the DR but of a migration policy (or lack of in practice), but someone not well acquainted with the country might think so.

Another example are the many older cars in Dominican streets. It may appear that the DR is poorer than countries that are much poorer based on that alone. Many people in general don't assume their is a cultural habit among Dominicans where usually a used car is thought of as 'better' because they have been tried already for their quality, they are harder vehicles than the newer ones that dent almost by touching the thing with your finger (cars are built like that nowadays to have less impact on the occupant in case of an accident, but most Dominicans don't have that registered yet), etc. The tale tell sign of this is that even in homes that are unquestionably middle class and up you will see in more cases than expected an older car model in the marquesina or driveway or parked outside. Do you really think that these people who had the ability to build a nice comfortable home (or buy) for themselves can't afford a newer car? Come on now. Another thing about cars is that on Dominican streets you will see many that aren't apt to be on the road with missing headlights, way too many dents, the tropical sun doing its thing on the paint of many cars, missing bumpers, etc. Many would interpret that as a manifestation of poverty, but it's something that is not common in countries that are considerably poorer than the DR. Extremely relaxed enforcement of safety rules on the road explains these carcasses on wheels still roaming around, vehicles that due to their conditions are forcibly taken out of circulation by the authorities of other countries including those much poorer than the DR. Of course, the elimination of the archaic conchos would do wonders in the car park department. I don't think there is a greater concentration of outdated 1980's cars than in those orgsnizations.

There are things of the DR that is often misinterpreted by many foreigners and even by many Dominicans. They are quick to think those things are a manifestation of poverty when in fact they are a manisfestation of cultural practices and relaxenforcement of the rules more so than poverty.

Ever think why the Dominican real estate market isn't similar to other real estate markets in North America and Europe? Why the prices of houses don't seem to reflect their market values? Culture, its all explained by Dominican cultural practices. Until someone takes that into account nothing about the DR will make sense to them.

Ever think why you can visit poorer countries than the DR and on the side of city streets and highway there is a lot less litter than in the DR? The fact that there are Dominican towns that are clean and the next one isn't as much, despite they are not that different economically from each other is explained by culture (some towns pride themselves on having clean streets, that's one pride I think should be national) and whether the local government cares about that. It has nothing to do with poverty and anyone that uses that as a way to judge poverty will misinterpret many places of the DR.

So on and so forth.
 
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USA DOC

Bronze
Feb 20, 2016
2,842
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I have seen some 911 in the capital, sometimes a Ferrari or a Lamborghini. Then I ask myself, what the hell do you want with this sportscars in a country without streets and speedlimits so you can't enjoy there real power?
For the streets in the DR it's more recommendable a Cayenne or Macan, better an Humvee. But yes, driving a 911 with sunglasses on you will become your attention, not only from women half of your age...
.. the frustration and problems of owning a very exspensive car here was not worth it for me... a toyota does just fine...
 
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Lobo Tropical

Silver
Aug 21, 2010
3,405
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It’s the reason I’m incorporating several new ventures in the DR at this moment. The DR has the fastest growing economy in all of Latin America and the Caribbean with an average of 4%-5% growth per annum. In 2017 alone there was a growth of 7%-9%. Those intelligent enough to invest in their economy (the right investments, not real estate) the past 5 years have seen unbelievable dividends to attest to this.

It’s helpful that most people still assume the DR is a poor country though, as it leaves a lot of venture opportunities for those of us intelligent enough to research pass the rumors and uneducated hearsay. My initial investment there before the pandemic was less than 5 figures. If I were to tell you share participation in that same venture has just surpassed the 7 figure mark this month, you’d laugh at me as I laugh all the way to the bank. 😂
Most of the posters live on tight budgets, know nothing of the DR other than the small, poor areas they traverse, or are old folks that are stuck in their assumptions. There’s also the envious type like Michael lurking as well.

Santo Domingo is loaded with luxury vehicles. Lamborghinis, Ferraris, Porsches (mostly driven by the ladies), Mclarens, Maseratis, etc. And now the Rolls Royce Cullinan is the new trend.

SD is also loaded with traffic jams, bad roads and nowhere to drive.
If you have a weak ego or need a penis extension, go and drive your Rolls Royce Sweptail orLamborghini Veneno Roadster down the Malecon.
There are those who don't flaunt their wealth and those who have the need to do show that they have wealth.
Ask yourself what the reasons are?

I'd-rather have a more functional car with high ground clearance in the DR.
If you want to drive a high performance car, do so on the German highways build for them.
Many sections without a speed limit, crazy Germans.

Those who know how to make investments are doing so throughout the world.
Why do you have the need to try to impress others and talk about yourself?
 
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