Real Dominican Heroes

lhtown

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Jan 8, 2002
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Independence Day is coming up in a couple of months. Who are some "Real Dominican Heroes" that we can lift up as examples of courage, accomplishment, education, character, etc? In short, who are some Dominicans whether famous or not who you would lift up as examples to your kids? They could be people you know who are "ordinary people" who do "extraordinary things" every day. They could be historical figures.

-Please, do not include any current political figures.
-Only serious recommendations, please.
-Please include a few sentences as to why you would recommend your nominee.
 

Indie

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Nov 15, 2002
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JUAN PABLO DUARTE

Padre de la Patria.

For his leadership, for raising una conciencia nacional colectiva, and for his very visible and important role in helping to preserve our Dominican identity.

For his role and undertaking in 1844 with the signing of our Declaration of Independence, which granted us freedom from both Spain and Haiti.

A real hero, in my book...

-Indie
 

CorletoLovesDR

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Jul 8, 2002
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General Gregorio Luper?n

I consider him a true dominican hero. Luperon and the fighters of the restoration of the dominican independence really fought against spanish rule during the restoration of independence war. The monument of Santiago honors their effort. I personally think that they fought more and had more bravery than the fighters of the indendence movement of 1844. I don't know if other people agree with me on this. Just my personal opinion...
 

Hillbilly

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Jan 1, 2002
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I can agree with both of those

It is difficult to find Washingtons, Franklins, Grants or Pershings in DR history.

The history of an Independant Dominican Republic is frought with caudillos, outright dictators, and wanna be leaders, some with good ideas others with not much on the ball. Time gilds most of their stories.

Local heros like Manolo Tavarez Justo and the other 14th of June members killed 40 years ago, were perhaps revolutionaries, but no brains, training or ability to lead an internal, Castro-like uprising in a country that was not even close to being the Cuba of 1956.

Others, like Mam? Ting? were killed for going against the "powers-that-be" at a time when change was in the air. Great leadership, poor judgement.

I think that Salom? Ure?a, and Pedro Henriquez are worthy of emulation. Juan Antonio Alix, a poet of the late 19th century was a wise social comentator. Maximo G?mez was a military leader of extraordinary capabilities, who lead the Cuban fight for independence against the Spainiards. Eugenio Mar?a Hostos, a Puertorican educator, came to the Dominican Republic to teach the new positivist ideas in education and ended up reforming the entire system.

Can't recall many more....but there are sure to be many I have misssed.

HB
 

mondongo

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Jan 1, 2002
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HB, glad you know about 14th June group. Despite the fact that my father was one of the leaders of that group, I know very little about them. I don't think they lacked brains, though...just maybe lacked critical mass.
 

Indie

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Nov 15, 2002
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mondongo...

If you'd like to know more on el Movimiento 14 de junio, a good start is by reading Caama?o: La Ultima Esperanza Armada by Manuel Matos Moquete. Very, very interesting and well-written. Among other things, the book includes pictures and lists all of the 14 of June members' names, their training(s), trials and tribulations. Really, it's a good read. (And I agree with you, those guys did not lack brains.)

-Indie
 

egomezb

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Feb 17, 2003
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Re: mondongo...

I also think Juan Pablo Duarte is the greatest dominican hero of all time. He was a person like no other who only wanted his country independence and not like many of his trinitarios fellows who only wanted power.

Indie, "La ultima esperanza armada" is not about the "Movimiento revolucionario 14 de junio" AKA 1J4. It's about the Caama?o last stand in the mountains of La Cordillera Central in the early 1970s. El 1J4 was a revolucionary movement which members were mostly middle-class professional and university students. It was form in 1959 as a movement against the Trujillo goverment. Its name come from the armed invasion by dominican exiles in June 1959.

The 1J4 was a very popular movement until they got into the mountains in late 1963 to fight against the Triunvirato who had overtrown Juan Bosch from power in September of that year. Most of its members died in that guerrilla uprising.

EGB.


Indie said:
If you'd like to know more on el Movimiento 14 de junio, a good start is by reading Caama?o: La Ultima Esperanza Armada by Manuel Matos Moquete. Very, very interesting and well-written. Among other things, the book includes pictures and lists all of the 14 of June members' names, their training(s), trials and tribulations. Really, it's a good read. (And I agree with you, those guys did not lack brains.)

-Indie
 

Indie

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Nov 15, 2002
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To egomezb Re: mondongo...

egomezb said:
Indie, "La ultima esperanza armada" is not about the "Movimiento revolucionario 14 de junio" AKA 1J4.
I didn't say it was.
egomezb said:
It's about the Caama?o last stand in the mountains of La Cordillera Central in the early 1970s...
I know what the book is about, since I read it and took the time to recommend it to a poster here. (But thanks for the info, egomezb!)

Here it is, one more time, with feeling:
If you'd like to know more on el Movimiento 14 de junio, a good start is by reading Caama?o: La Ultima Esperanza Armada by Manuel Matos Moquete. Very, very interesting and well-written. Among other things, the book includes pictures and lists all of the 14 of June members' names, their training(s), trials and tribulations. Really, it's a good read.

-Indie
 

Hillbilly

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Jan 1, 2002
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Not to case aspersions

1J4 was a pretty idealistic movement, anti-Trujillo and very far to the left.

When I made the comment "no brains" I was not referring to their IQs. I meant they had no "smarts". Do you realize that these people went into the mountains with no training? No logistic support, no communications, few weapons, and little or no knowledge of the land, much less any knowledge of where the sympathies of the local campesinos lay. I liken their gesture to a little boy that is angry and goes off on a tear, but doesn't see the crack in the sidewalk and falls down and breaks his tooth! They were babes in the woods. Inspired maybe, smart, not half enough.

For the most part they were pointed out to the militia by the local 'alcaides' and campesinos...the local population was far from a "critical mass" as any study of those times will reveal...There were too many other pressing matters.

HB
 
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