Recession of 2008 and impact on the DR

NanSanPedro

Nickel with tin plating
Apr 12, 2019
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Alida has a lot of family on LI, Hempstead, Patchogue, East Islip.

The young ones are talking of moving from the area in mass, pondering Orlando, which I discourage (it is a rather depressing, low-wage area primarily fueled by The Mouse House). I am suggesting the burbs of San Antonio, Phoenix/Tuscan, Nashville, Charlotte or the Tampa Bay areas if they want a larger city.

They are all bi-lingual and would thrive in those areas.

IMO, NY will take an enormous economic hit disproportionate to the direct cause of the virus. Seems people are waking up to the downside consequences of living on top of each other, along with the horrors of packed public transportation.
I lived in Tucson. Strongly advise they consider it. Very cool town with not much traffic.
 
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I suspect one downstream consequence of the NYC virus wildfire is many thousands leaving the cramped confines of NYC for less crowded burbs and other states, including numerous companies with HQ in those high-rises.

Losing inhabitants and tax revenues will not bode well for the large urban areas.

The winners? "Exoburbs."
NYC is the Capital of the World. The weak, the undercapitalized will be removed from the playing field via an economic natural selection. In place will come stronger, better capitalized and more resilient replacements.

Every call regarding NYC alleged demise into oblivion and insignificance as in an Escape from New York event has been a losing proposition. It will come back better than ever before.
 
Sep 22, 2009
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NYC is the Capital of the World. The weak, the undercapitalized will be removed from the playing field via an economic natural selection. In place will come stronger, better capitalized and more resilient replacements.

Every call regarding NYC alleged demise into oblivion and insignificance as in an Escape from New York event has been a losing proposition. It will come back better than ever before.
Everything's ok over here at the Illuminati
 
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Sep 22, 2009
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Well, the laundered money in the banks and streets will keep em propped up for a good while. The currency won't be worth a damn though.
 

cobraboy

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Jul 24, 2004
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NYC is the Capital of the World. The weak, the undercapitalized will be removed from the playing field via an economic natural selection. In place will come stronger, better capitalized and more resilient replacements.

Every call regarding NYC alleged demise into oblivion and insignificance as in an Escape from New York event has been a losing proposition. It will come back better than ever before.
I doubt NYC will die.

Just a lot of people and many businesses will leave.

The area has been bleeding population for years now, and that trend will continue, if not increase.
 
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Third world countries such as the DR are fighting a losing battle. The longer they pathetically attempt to contain an invisible enemy, the greater the danger of inflicting permanent damage to the economy.

In the end nothing gained. The best route is the Swedish Model of Containment. Protect as much as possible high risk groups while maintaining an open economy.

This two pronged approach fairly distributes risk by not placing the burden of containment solely on the subsistence wage earners. This group is 90 percent of the population.

By this form, 3rd world countries as the DR can protect its citizens from the consequences both economically and epidemiologically from the coronavirus pandemic.
 
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cobraboy

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Third world countries such as the DR are fighting a losing battle. The longer they pathetically attempt to contain an invisible enemy, the greater the danger of inflicting permanent damage to the economy.

In the end nothing gained. The best route is the Swedish Model of Containment. Protect as much as possible high risk groups while maintaining an open economy.

This two pronged approach fairly distributes risk by not placing the burden of containment solely on the subsistence wage earners. This group is 90 percent of the population.

By this form, 3rd world countries as the DR can protect its citizens from the consequences both economically and epidemiologically from the coronavirus pandemic.
I largely agree, especially the Swedish model.

I'm just not sure that model applies to the DR and the culture.

Swedes aren't particularly touchy-feely and as gregarious as Dominicans, not to mention Dominicans live on top of each other.

And multiple-generation households are the rule here out of economic necessity, unlike Sweden. It would be nearly impossible to sequester the old and vulnerable.

Other than that, I'm all-in for herd immunity and think much of the economic damage in the hemisphere is unnecessary and self-inflicted.

How will the DR survive? That's the RD$3,500,000 question...
 

Cortez

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Mar 26, 2019
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Like I said, give it until Dec 31st 2020 and we will see how things went quick
Things $$ will be better by the new year..In the summer?....If the americans, Canadians, most Europeans will not vacation when there is a ression and money is short...…...
 

PICHARDO

One Dominican at a time, please!
May 15, 2003
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I largely agree, especially the Swedish model.

I'm just not sure that model applies to the DR and the culture.

Swedes aren't particularly touchy-feely and as gregarious as Dominicans, not to mention Dominicans live on top of each other.

And multiple-generation households are the rule here out of economic necessity, unlike Sweden. It would be nearly impossible to sequester the old and vulnerable.

Other than that, I'm all-in for herd immunity and think much of the economic damage in the hemisphere is unnecessary and self-inflicted.

How will the DR survive? That's the RD$3,500,000 question...

I have to correct you there Cb.

Dominican households don’t rely on multiple generations on the same home due to economics, but because unlike other countries we were criados keeping our parents and grandparents with us at home once their age are advanced. As parents we also want to have input into our kids general living, be it economical, health or socially.
We keep them at home because that’s how our parents did with us, for the long haul.

Once they married, we also tend to poke them to stay with us and waaaaaaiiiiit a bit more before moving on, telling them it will be more solid financially. But the reality is that for us, family is more than just the last name and having brought them into life.

The reality is that some of those households can’t keep the multiple generations together, but keep networking socially and economically (when possible), because of the same economics where the bread maker can’t cover all the expenses.

For us, our kids will be forever kids and our parents the heads of the household, and the last word on anything.

It’s cultural, not economics.

My daughter made more money than me, living in my household, until she married. She divorced and we asked her to move back in with us with her kids (dizque to help her with baby sitting 😉) until she married again and even then her kids stayed with us for almost two years till they finally moved in with her and the new husband.

For us Dominicans, there’s no greater joy than meeting our parents/grandparents/kids and grandkids when we arrive home. The worst day’s memory washes away instantly...
 

alexw

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Sep 6, 2008
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I have to correct you there Cb.

Dominican households don’t rely on multiple generations on the same home due to economics, but because unlike other countries we were criados keeping our parents and grandparents with us at home once their age are advanced. As parents we also want to have input into our kids general living, be it economical, health or socially.
We keep them at home because that’s how our parents did with us, for the long haul.

Once they married, we also tend to poke them to stay with us and waaaaaaiiiiit a bit more before moving on, telling them it will be more solid financially. But the reality is that for us, family is more than just the last name and having brought them into life.

The reality is that some of those households can’t keep the multiple generations together, but keep networking socially and economically (when possible), because of the same economics where the bread maker can’t cover all the expenses.

For us, our kids will be forever kids and our parents the heads of the household, and the last word on anything.

It’s cultural, not economics.

My daughter made more money than me, living in my household, until she married. She divorced and we asked her to move back in with us with her kids (dizque to help her with baby sitting 😉) until she married again and even then her kids stayed with us for almost two years till they finally moved in with her and the new husband.

For us Dominicans, there’s no greater joy than meeting our parents/grandparents/kids and grandkids when we arrive home. The worst day’s memory washes away instantly...
Amazing post!
 

cobraboy

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Jul 24, 2004
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I have to correct you there Cb.

Dominican households don’t rely on multiple generations on the same home due to economics, but because unlike other countries we were criados keeping our parents and grandparents with us at home once their age are advanced. As parents we also want to have input into our kids general living, be it economical, health or socially.
We keep them at home because that’s how our parents did with us, for the long haul.

Once they married, we also tend to poke them to stay with us and waaaaaaiiiiit a bit more before moving on, telling them it will be more solid financially. But the reality is that for us, family is more than just the last name and having brought them into life.

The reality is that some of those households can’t keep the multiple generations together, but keep networking socially and economically (when possible), because of the same economics where the bread maker can’t cover all the expenses.

For us, our kids will be forever kids and our parents the heads of the household, and the last word on anything.

It’s cultural, not economics.

My daughter made more money than me, living in my household, until she married. She divorced and we asked her to move back in with us with her kids (dizque to help her with baby sitting 😉) until she married again and even then her kids stayed with us for almost two years till they finally moved in with her and the new husband.

For us Dominicans, there’s no greater joy than meeting our parents/grandparents/kids and grandkids when we arrive home. The worst day’s memory washes away instantly...
I agree with a lot of what you say, especially among the upper classes, many of whom worked their way up.

But within the great lower classes, it seems to be driven by economics. This, after generations, may and maybe *did* become cultural, but the roots are economic as much as anything.

It's sorta like throwing toilet paper in that little trash can. Few structures are built with old-school tiny diameter plumbing, but the behavior is set and they still do it anyway. So a physical issue morphs into culture.

That said, one of the primary reasons I live here is because of the reverence shown elders. I brought my mom here for that reason, and she loved it.
 
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alexw

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Sep 6, 2008
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I agree with a lot of what you say, especially among the upper classes, many of whom worked their way up.

But within the great lower classes, it seems to be driven by economics. This, after generations, may and maybe *did* become cultural, but the roots are economic as much as anything.

It's sorta like throwing toilet paper in that little trash can. Few structures are built with old-school tiny diameter plumbing, but the behavior is set and they still do it anyway. So a physical issue morphs into culture.

That said, one of the primary reasons I live here is because of the reverence shown elders. I brought my mom here for that reason, and she loved it.
Dios, CB a foreigner who doesnt know much of anything, is going tell a native Dominican about what their culture is. UnFreakingReal. Lmao.
 

cobraboy

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Jul 24, 2004
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Dios, CB a foreigner who doesnt know much of anything, is going tell a native Dominican about what their culture is. UnFreakingReal. Lmao.
I have lived here for over 12 years, married into a large Dominican family, have done business here for years, travel the country far more than most, and pay close attention.
 

PICHARDO

One Dominican at a time, please!
May 15, 2003
12,322
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Santiago de Los 30 Caballeros
I agree with a lot of what you say, especially among the upper classes, many of whom worked their way up.

But within the great lower classes, it seems to be driven by economics. This, after generations, may and maybe *did* become cultural, but the roots are economic as much as anything.

It's sorta like throwing toilet paper in that little trash can. Few structures are built with old-school tiny diameter plumbing, but the behavior is set and they still do it anyway. So a physical issue morphs into culture.

That said, one of the primary reasons I live here is because of the reverence shown elders. I brought my mom here for that reason, and she loved it.

Most homes with internal bathrooms were build using a septic tank.

So many wanted to avoid having the septic cleaned more often due to excessive toilet paper overflow. It wasn’t because of the pipe diameter much (some yes) and more about saving a buck and the stink for days from the septic’s lid removal.

The lombrices could eat all the feces but not the paper for some reason (taste? 😂).

The latrines just got moved somewhere else behind the house once full...