Rethinking The Haitian Ban on Dominican Exports?

Mr_DR

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May 12, 2002
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Rethinking the Haitian ban on Dominican exports

Writing in El Dia today, Friday 21 June, the executive director of the National Competitiveness Council (CNC) Andres Vanderhorst recommends that Dominican companies set up operations in Haiti to get around local taxation and trade obstacles.

The CNC director says the DR needs to diversify its source markets. He said the DR has become too dependent on the US and Haiti and that the 11 million inhabitants of Haiti need to be seen as a big opportunity for Dominican companies.

Vanderhorst added that Haiti is aware that it has a large domestic market and is creating local companies with foreign investment. It is also closing its doors to imports.

"If we want to eat part of the Haiti cake and its growth, then we have to be proactive and start going international, by opening new plants in Haiti," he writes. Some Dominican companies are already doing this. "This way we will create jobs for people who will not have to come here to beg, we will move capital from offshore banks to productive areas and we will help improve their living conditions while generating wealth," he adds.

He expressed hope that maybe in 30 years a free trade agreement can be signed with Haiti. He said that the Haitians oppose the TLC now, the same way Dominican industries oppose the country signing an agreement with Colombia.

Some companies are already setting up shop in Haiti to get around the local industrial sector opposition to taxation privileges for companies set up in border provinces. Their output will re-enter the Dominican Republic for local sales as an export from Haiti.

Van Der Horst plantea empresas de RD piensen instalarse en Hait? - ElDia.com.do

Source: Dominican Republic News & Travel Information Service

I think Vanderhorst needs to cut down on the Brugal if he thinks that the solution would be for Dominicans to cross into Haiti and set up shops to avoid the taxes imposed by The Haitian gov on Dominican exports. It takes a Dominican gambling businessman to do such a thing, especially to invest in a country that has been in a downtrend of instability since day one as a country.

I think that they would have better luck at using that money in Las Vegas instead.
 

the gorgon

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Sep 16, 2010
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Rethinking the Haitian ban on Dominican exports

Writing in El Dia today, Friday 21 June, the executive director of the National Competitiveness Council (CNC) Andres Vanderhorst recommends that Dominican companies set up operations in Haiti to get around local taxation and trade obstacles.

The CNC director says the DR needs to diversify its source markets. He said the DR has become too dependent on the US and Haiti and that the 11 million inhabitants of Haiti need to be seen as a big opportunity for Dominican companies.

Vanderhorst added that Haiti is aware that it has a large domestic market and is creating local companies with foreign investment. It is also closing its doors to imports.

"If we want to eat part of the Haiti cake and its growth, then we have to be proactive and start going international, by opening new plants in Haiti," he writes. Some Dominican companies are already doing this. "This way we will create jobs for people who will not have to come here to beg, we will move capital from offshore banks to productive areas and we will help improve their living conditions while generating wealth," he adds.

He expressed hope that maybe in 30 years a free trade agreement can be signed with Haiti. He said that the Haitians oppose the TLC now, the same way Dominican industries oppose the country signing an agreement with Colombia.

Some companies are already setting up shop in Haiti to get around the local industrial sector opposition to taxation privileges for companies set up in border provinces. Their output will re-enter the Dominican Republic for local sales as an export from Haiti.

Van Der Horst plantea empresas de RD piensen instalarse en Hait? - ElDia.com.do

Source: Dominican Republic News & Travel Information Service

I think Vanderhorst needs to cut down on the Brugal if he thinks that the solution would be for Dominicans to cross into Haiti and set up shops to avoid the taxes imposed by The Haitian gov on Dominican exports. It takes a Dominican gambling businessman to do such a thing, especially to invest in a country that has been in a downtrend of instability since day one as a country.

I think that they would have better luck at using that money in Las Vegas instead.

well, other countries are investing there, so maybe they see it differently
 

Mr_DR

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May 12, 2002
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well, other countries are investing there, so maybe they see it differently

Sorry the Gorgon but other countries are not as familiar with Haiti as is Dominican Republic. There hasn't been anything different here that has not happened in the past. Beside the mining companies extracting all the riches out of the country.The only thing that I see going on now is some sympathy investing due to the earthquake. Anything other than that is just pure gamble on a train that has been going south from day one. These people are not investing, they are just gambling.

They are just hoping that things will continue to get better, but they do not have a crystal ball, or do they?
 

the gorgon

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Sep 16, 2010
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Sorry the Gorgon but other countries are not as familiar with Haiti as is Dominican Republic. There hasn't been anything different here that has not happened in the past. Beside the mining companies extracting all the riches out of the country.The only thing that I see going on now is some sympathy investing due to the earthquake. Anything other than that is just pure gamble on a train that has been going south from day one. These people are not investing, they are just gambling.

They are just hoping that things will continue to get better, but they do not have a crystal ball, or do they?

does Barrick Gold have a crystal ball? maybe it fell, and broke.
 
Mar 1, 2009
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I agree with MRDR as much as I hate to admit it. The Dominican companies would be the first ones to suffer in Haiti. Haitians just don't like us and that country is a basketcase. The earthquake happened years ago and they are still living in Tents. The Katrina survivors have almost all rebuilt their lives. Then again maybe I'm wrong, right MountaineAnnie?
 

Dolores1

DR1
May 3, 2000
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Rethinking the Haitian ban on Dominican exports

Writing in El Dia today, Friday 21 June, the executive director of the National Competitiveness Council (CNC) Andres Vanderhorst recommends that Dominican companies set up operations in Haiti to get around local taxation and trade obstacles.

The CNC director says the DR needs to diversify its source markets. He said the DR has become too dependent on the US and Haiti and that the 11 million inhabitants of Haiti need to be seen as a big opportunity for Dominican companies.

Vanderhorst added that Haiti is aware that it has a large domestic market and is creating local companies with foreign investment. It is also closing its doors to imports.

"If we want to eat part of the Haiti cake and its growth, then we have to be proactive and start going international, by opening new plants in Haiti," he writes. Some Dominican companies are already doing this. "This way we will create jobs for people who will not have to come here to beg, we will move capital from offshore banks to productive areas and we will help improve their living conditions while generating wealth," he adds.

He expressed hope that maybe in 30 years a free trade agreement can be signed with Haiti. He said that the Haitians oppose the TLC now, the same way Dominican industries oppose the country signing an agreement with Colombia.

Some companies are already setting up shop in Haiti to get around the local industrial sector opposition to taxation privileges for companies set up in border provinces. Their output will re-enter the Dominican Republic for local sales as an export from Haiti.

Van Der Horst plantea empresas de RD piensen instalarse en Hait? - ElDia.com.do

Source: Dominican Republic News & Travel Information Service

I think Vanderhorst needs to cut down on the Brugal if he thinks that the solution would be for Dominicans to cross into Haiti and set up shops to avoid the taxes imposed by The Haitian gov on Dominican exports. It takes a Dominican gambling businessman to do such a thing, especially to invest in a country that has been in a downtrend of instability since day one as a country.

I think that they would have better luck at using that money in Las Vegas instead.

I know of a rum-producing company that had set up operations in Neiba to get the tax reductions authorized by the border incentives law. The rum industry protested the company. Now he is setting up the operation in Haiti. The DR loses jobs for about 60 people that will be gained in Haiti for the production part set up there, sort of a twin plant. It is happening. Dominican companies will do precisely what Van der Horst is suggesting. What he is saying is not far-fetched. It is reality.
 

GWOZOZO

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Dec 7, 2011
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I think both countries should work toward reducing this trade relationship..

It is up to DR to find other markets.

We Haitians should look for other suppliers and offer sweet deals and tax breaks to investors from Asia and other places.

Irish owned Digicel is a perfect example of how a European group revolutionized the phone industry in Haiti...made profits..and has become a great contributor to many civic causes in the country.

Because of the mistrust and dislike between Haitians and Dominicans.......visible Dominican investments will only increase the bad feelings.

Haiti will only move forward if it reduces its dependence on DR.
 

Chip

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Jul 25, 2007
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Santiago
Can somebody tell me if the issue of foreign ownership of property has been resolved?

What about property dispute laws? I am familiar with Haitian survey practices and they were not to long ago about 100-200 years behind current standards.

Finally, can foreign businesses be assured that a consistent tax/bribe rate can be expected? That last I heard from foreigners looking to do business in Haiti it was 25% of gross.
 

cobraboy

Pro-Bono Demolition Hobbyist
Jul 24, 2004
40,964
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Someone explain to me how to build an investment model in a country with a per capita GDP of around $800 a year.

Less that $70 a month.

I'm all ears...
 

GWOZOZO

Bronze
Dec 7, 2011
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Can somebody tell me if the issue of foreign ownership of property has been resolved?

What about property dispute laws? I am familiar with Haitian survey practices and they were not to long ago about 100-200 years behind current standards.

Finally, can foreign businesses be assured that a consistent tax/bribe rate can be expected? That last I heard from foreigners looking to do business in Haiti it was 25% of gross.

Everything has been resolved ON PAPER..lol

That's why only the big guns USA, korea, Brazil and Europe should be investing in Haiti...they can set/bypass the rules.
 

GWOZOZO

Bronze
Dec 7, 2011
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Someone explain to me how to build an investment model in a country with a per capita GDP of around $800 a year.

Less that $70 a month.

I'm all ears...

It is up to Haiti to redirect the millions it spent importing...towards local production in partnesrhip with north american, asian, european investors....by offering them land, a protected market from imports...and generous tax breaks.

Many poor countries have and are moving up economically.

Starting with basic stuff like poultry is a smart move......and gradually move to other imports.
 
Mar 1, 2009
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Haiti will be right back where it started in about 5-7 years from now. They'll start building some critical mass and someone somewhere will efff it all up. An insurrection, a riot, a group of have nots will take over the government and tear up all the prior gains. It's just Haiti being Haiti. I hope I'm wrong. It's sad, but it's true.
The people are still living in tents!!!
 

cobraboy

Pro-Bono Demolition Hobbyist
Jul 24, 2004
40,964
936
113
It is up to Haiti to redirect the millions it spent importing...towards local production in partnesrhip with north american, asian, european investors....by offering them land, a protected market from imports...and generous tax breaks.

Many poor countries have and are moving up economically.

Starting with basic stuff like poultry is a smart move......and gradually move to other imports.
Build me the economic model...
 

GWOZOZO

Bronze
Dec 7, 2011
1,108
0
0
Build me the economic model...

hein??? why would I build YOU an economic model? for what purpose?

the haitian government and private sector with the help of the advanced countries that are involved will decide on a model to build or to follow.
 

GWOZOZO

Bronze
Dec 7, 2011
1,108
0
0
Haiti will be right back where it started in about 5-7 years from now. They'll start building some critical mass and someone somewhere will efff it all up. An insurrection, a riot, a group of have nots will take over the government and tear up all the prior gains. It's just Haiti being Haiti. I hope I'm wrong. It's sad, but it's true.
The people are still living in tents!!!

Most unlikely. That was the reason for removing the so called haitian army and putting Haiti under foreign tutelage.

As for the people still living in tents....their number has been reduced.....it is a slow process as Haiti is a poor country.

That however will not stop activity in other sectors.
 

Chip

Platinum
Jul 25, 2007
16,772
430
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Santiago
Honestly, there is money to be made selling chucheria, one just needs to be patient and diligent. I have a Dominican friend who rented a small colmado before buying it with financing before turning it into a supermarket and now is relatively wealthy by Dominican standards. I would say it took him 8-9 years to get to this point.
 

Mr_DR

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May 12, 2002
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Haiti will be right back where it started in about 5-7 years from now. They'll start building some critical mass and someone somewhere will efff it all up. An insurrection, a riot, a group of have nots will take over the government and tear up all the prior gains. It's just Haiti being Haiti. I hope I'm wrong. It's sad, but it's true.
The people are still living in tents!!!
That i the plain truth, a less gambler or a smarter investor would wait until sign of concrete stability.
 

Mr_DR

Silver
May 12, 2002
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does Barrick Gold have a crystal ball? maybe it fell, and broke.

That is also the problem with y'all, you spend too much time comparing DR to Haiti and think that both country are similar just as you compare Haitians to Dominicans and think that we look the same when we are millions of miles apart in culture, customs,music, dance, Religion, food, language and even sport.
 
May 29, 2006
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