Revision of Staying Extension includes return ticket

cavok

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Jun 16, 2014
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Ah, yes. Certainly not an issue at all in the scheme of things. The DR would be on the hook even if deporting legal residents for sufficiently breaking the law. Not something worth worrying about either in total costs expended.
No, they wouldn't. Legal residents have to buy repatriation insurance which would cover deportation costs.
 

windeguy

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Jul 10, 2004
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Just because you personally have not seen a problem it doesn't mean it doesn't exist. I have not personally seen kilos and kilos of drugs being exported from DR but I know it happens.
We do read about that almost weekly on DR1...
The main point I was making still stands. This policy is aimed at those from poorer backgrounds not at rich expats.
Chinese need a visa. They don't enter on tourist cards.

The Dominican Consulates have the right to issue and renew the tourism visas (TS) and business simple (NS) to legal residents in their corresponding jurisdictions without previous authorization of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs with the exception of visas requested by Cuba, Colombia, Saudi Arabia, Argelia, Morocco, Muritania, Sahara, Somalia, Sudán, Túnez, Yemen, Libya, Irán, Irak, Jordan, Lebanon, Oman, Palestine, Syria, Afghanistan, Hong Kong, Popular Republic of China, India and Pakistan.

 

windeguy

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No, they wouldn't. Legal residents have to buy repatriation insurance which would cover deportation costs.
Ah, I had forgotten about that. Thanks for that .

So the amount of people being repatriated on the DRs Peso is virtually non-existent. Insignificant in the scheme of things. At least so far.
 

cavok

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Ah, I had forgotten about that. Thanks for that .

So the amount of people being repatriated on the DRs Peso is virtually non-existent. Insignificant in the scheme of things. At least so far.
Apparently, DGM didn't think it was insignificant which was why legal residents were forced to buy repatriation insurance starting about 4 years ago. Prior to that, you just needed to provide proof of solvency or have a "guarantor" sign-off for you - usually a lawyer.

I saw an article posted here and I was surprised at just how many Americans, Canadians, and Europeans do get deported every year. Granted, very small compared to the number of Haitians, and most of them were probably chronic overstayers - not legal residents.
 

windeguy

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Apparently, DGM didn't think it was insignificant which was why legal residents were forced to buy repatriation insurance starting about 4 years ago. Prior to that, you just needed to provide proof of solvency or have a "guarantor" sign-off for you - usually a lawyer.

I saw an article posted here and I was surprised at just how many Americans, Canadians, and Europeans do get deported every year. Granted, very small compared to the number of Haitians, and most of them were probably chronic overstayers - not legal residents.
I was talking about people overstaying tourist cards. Not legal residents that do bad things and get deported. This thread is about tourist cards and extensions.
 

cavok

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I was talking about people overstaying tourist cards. Not legal residents that do bad things and get deported. This thread is about tourist cards and extensions.
That's exactly what I said - "most of them were probably chronic overstayers". And the airline is not paying to fly them back.
 

windeguy

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That's exactly what I said - "most of them were probably chronic overstayers". And the airline is not paying to fly them back.
There is not one person who knows any chronic overstayer that was deported for chronic overstays. So they say.
The number from tourist card countries deported for crimes against humanity that were overstayers is likely pretty small.
A very small subset of the overstaying population.
 

MariaRubia

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Jun 25, 2019
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We do read about that almost weekly on DR1
Actually we don't. We hear about drugs being seized when they are on the way into the DR but it's rare to hear about them being seized when they are about to be exported. I was reading an interesting article which said exactly this and suggested this showed how involved government has been in the export of drugs.

"what is interesting is that the vast majority of cocaine seizures occur on the way into the Dominican Republic. This means that once on the island, organized crime is able to move and export drug shipments with relative ease and security. This suggests high-level corruption in local law enforcement, the national anti-drug agency and the port authorities, perhaps including political top cover. Almost all sources consulted agreed on this, but were reluctant to go on the record. "

The whole article is here...

 
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SKY

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Apr 11, 2004
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Thanks for your replies, but my friends absolutely want to make the official request for an extension of stay, so they must know in advance which economic solvency documents are going to be requested of them. Has anyone applied and what documents has he provided for economic solvency, please?
They will spend a good deal of time wasted and most likely get nowhere. But let us know how they make out.
 

AlaPlaya

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Jan 7, 2021
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Thanks for your replies, but my friends absolutely want to make the official request for an extension of stay, so they must know in advance which economic solvency documents are going to be requested of them. Has anyone applied and what documents has he provided for economic solvency, please?
Bank statement. Saw someone else said three months' worth of statements. I only use my most recent statement when I apply for it.
 

windeguy

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When I go to renew my Residency, a large proportion of the people there are (or look like) Chinese. They even have at least one Chinese origin lawyer who speaks their language. So I would say a lot of the Chinese here are legal residents.
Yes, indeed. I noticed a steady increase in the Chinese contingent at Migracion getting residency over my last couple of residency renewals. No surprise that is still happening.
 

JD Jones

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Jan 7, 2016
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When I go to renew my Residency, a large proportion of the people there are (or look like) Chinese. They even have at least one Chinese origin lawyer who speaks their language. So I would say a lot of the Chinese here are legal residents.
There is a huge Chinese "Society" here, out of sight, out of mind.

I know a few who "own" Pica Pollos, all of which are financed within that society and are required to purchase all of their supplies from certain Chinese businesses.

Most Chinese do business with other Chinese; the exception being businesses that sell to Dominicans.

They are more deeply embedded in this country than most folks can imagine.

Is that a bad thing? I don't think so.