Schools in Santo Domingo

Sarah Stagg

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Jan 22, 2022
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Hi there, please could people give me recommendations of schools in Santo Domingo based on their own personal experience please? My daughter will be going into sixth form there. Thank you
 

Auryn

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There is a wide variety depending on location and tuition cost.

If none of those things matter so much, then I’d say Carol Morgan, St. Michaels, and St. George are the top 3. They are very expensive but provide high quality education.
 

mountainannie

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I have known alumni and teachers from all three schools. Carol Morgan is the choice for most of the upper class Dominicans - and has many students there who are Uber Rich - chauffeurs and nannies bringing their lunches. I met several young Americans who taught there for a year or two - but would not have been considered qualified to teach in a US school.

St Michael's is accredited by the US school system whereas St George's is British..I would recommend either of those over Carol Morgan.. And given your use of "sixth form" - St George's might be the best fit

 
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Auryn

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Morgan pays teachers the best/highest in the country and hasn’t hired anyone without an education degree in a decade, at least. They were part of recruiting agencies which prevented them from hiring unqualified people.

All three schools have students from extremely wealthy political and business families., mostly Dominican but also expat.

That being said, I’d also recommend St. Michael’s or St. George first.

St. Michael’s School
 
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aarhus

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I am just speculating now as I know next to nothing about it. What if someone didn’t have the resources to pay those schools. Would it work using the best possible public school in a reasonable neighborhood and then supplement with home schooling ? Or if neither maybe better not to move here with kids. During the years Danish expats I kept contact with here and in other similar countries all moved to Denmark after the first years with their children in school.
 

Auryn

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I am just speculating now as I know next to nothing about it. What if someone didn’t have the resources to pay those schools. Would it work using the best possible public school in a reasonable neighborhood and then supplement with home schooling ? Or if neither maybe better not to move here with kids. During the years Danish expats I kept contact with here and in other similar countries all moved to Denmark after the first years with their children in school.
There are much cheaper options for private schools. My husband and his siblings attended one nowhere near the cost of those listed above, and they received a good education.

Colegio Bilingüe New Horizons

Brilliant Minds

There are many others, cheaper than those two, depending on the area of SD. New Horizons tends to have better feedback. I don’t believe either of of those listed above make tuition costs public.
 

bob saunders

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Another one worth checking out is https://americanschool.edu.do/ I know a teacher there that, of course , speaks highly of it.
 

windeguy

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Morgan pays teachers the best/highest in the country and hasn’t hired anyone without an education degree in a decade, at least. They were part of recruiting agencies which prevented them from hiring unqualified people.
How much do they pay teachers? Despite MA's comments that some of their teachers would not be allowed to teach in the US..
 

windeguy

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I am just speculating now as I know next to nothing about it. What if someone didn’t have the resources to pay those schools. Would it work using the best possible public school in a reasonable neighborhood and then supplement with home schooling ? Or if neither maybe better not to move here with kids. During the years Danish expats I kept contact with here and in other similar countries all moved to Denmark after the first years with their children in school.I do
No idea regarding any public schools being worth anything in Santo Domingo. On the north coast, they were not worth anything.
So my wife sent her daughter to local private "Christian" oriented schools. Seemed to work out OK. She is a banker in Florida now.
 

aarhus

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No idea regarding any public schools being worth anything in Santo Domingo. On the north coast, they were not worth anything.
So my wife sent her daughter to local private "Christian" oriented schools. Seemed to work out OK. She is a banker in Florida now.
I actually think some foreigners do exactly what I suggested. They have no choice
 

Auryn

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How much do they pay teachers? Despite MA's comments that some of their teachers would not be allowed to teach in the US..
The salary range at Morgan is now at a range of $48-$72K USD per year. As with all international schools, this includes various other perks such as free housing, utilities, moving allowance, and usually a free flight beginning and end of contract. At one time, Morgan had a Masters Program option for their teachers in conjunction with a U.S. university.

They have hired foreign teachers with degrees in education since at least 2013, if not much earlier. They are part of teacher recruiting agencies that require them to hire qualified teachers in order to maintain membership. The only way they would have unqualified teachers would be if they were considered local hires, and I can’t see that for expat teachers, at least not at Morgan.
 
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NanSanPedro

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Nadie21

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Many foreign companies and NGOs pay the tuition for children of their employees.... Along with housing/health plans/ home guards... So the personal wealth of the OP ought not factor into it.
True but you do not put your child in blindly and in DR $$$$$ equates (hopefully) better quality education here.. You should be checking out everything
 

Auryn

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Hard to argue. An education degree is valued in the profession I know, but I don't see it as worthwhile. If I want a math teacher, I want a math major, same with chemistry, history, etc. Also a bit of experience in the field or if not at least in the real world.
Education degrees typically require a major and a minor. At least, since the days of teachers college (pre-1985 in most cases). Some places are more strict on this, and will not hire teachers whose major/minor does not align with the job description.
Even elementary teachers are required to choose a major and minor.

Sure, you can apply for a high school Math/Chemistry job if your degree is in French language, but most places won’t hire you. In rare circumstances if a school is desperate, maybe. To be able to do that, the French teacher would have to take what’s called an Additional Qualifications certificate (or the like) in Math and/or Chemistry to land that teaching job.

I for one wouldn’t necessarily want somebody with a just Math degree and no teacher training to be my kids high school Math teacher. Education degrees include important classes on curriculum, ethics, classroom management, and teaching strategies to name a few.
I’d be fine if it were a university professor with no education background, but not a K-12 teacher.

The discussion that Morgan hires unqualified teachers has not been true in the past decade. The same would be true except in rare circumstances for schools like St. Michael’s and St. George, at least. I have never worked at Morgan, but there needs to be accurate information on that topic considering the OPs question.
 

El Hijo de Manolo

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I for one wouldn’t necessarily want somebody with a just Math degree and no teacher training to be my kids high school Math teacher. Education degrees include important classes on curriculum, ethics, classroom management, and teaching strategies to name a few.
I’d be fine if it were a university professor with no education background, but not a K-12 teacher.
Well this is really it. A good teacher to me is one that not only can show a child how and why, but has the training and talent to bridge the two. In high school i had math teachers that were failed programmers (i assumed because they were poor mostly) i learned nothing. Only could memorize a process on how to solve a particular problem. It wasnt until college where one professor in particular and a motivated grad student opened my eyes to my mind and i suddenly saw things in a way that i had never before. That's good teaching.
 

Auryn

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Absolutely good teachers make that bridge between knowledge and communication. My Grade 10 Math teacher had an Education Masters in Calculus with a Physics minor and had no idea how to explain concepts. Every class he gave 5-10 minutes of instruction, assigned 25 questions, and gave a test on Fridays. Not much else in between besides correcting at his desk. He was brilliant but couldn’t share it with students effectively.
He went on to get his doctorate and write curriculum. He became a tenured prof, but most students in his classes had to get additional outside tutoring, just to pass.
Grade 11 was a regular teacher with a History major and a Math minor, and he not only caught the class up, but we had an excellent head start in Grade 12. He sat with us individually or had small group sessions for extra help for half the class time or more. Never at his desk marking.

This is an extremely subjective conversation that is veering off topic quickly.

Most things relevant to the original post in regards to teacher qualifications have been covered.
 
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