Senator Felix Bautista opposes Goldquest gold mine in San Juan de la Maguana province

Dolores

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San Juan de la Maguana province senator Felix Bautista (Fuerza del Pueblo – San Juan de la Maguana) warns of the damages the exploitation of a gold mine located in the Romero section of the Sabaneta municipal district would bring to the southwestern province. Bautista refers to the interests of the Canadian mining company, Goldquest in the operation of a gold mine in the area.

Bautista acknowledges the tax revenues and economic impact of the mine on the area. Nevertheless he says it would harm more than 500,000 inhabitants and the flora and fauna of the region.

“We are strongly opposed to the exploitation of the Romero Mine in the San Juan province, since its exploitation in that place would be highly detrimental to the San Juan Valley and to the Enriquillo Region,” said the legislator.

Among the reasons for his opposition, he pointed out that the...

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westcan

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How such a corrupt individual stays in the party I do not understand. Money is power I guess. As far as Goldquest and Romero are concerned, the mine plan that is envisioned does not plan on using any cyanide at all.
 

Yourmaninvegas

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Feb 16, 2016
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One thing I see on DR1 constantly is attacking the individual when they cannot make intelligent argument ‼️

All you have to do is look at where the company wants to put the mine and see that it a bad idea.
I do not need an environmental study that most likely will not be based on science to tell me that.

Dom. Rep.: Community opposes GoldQuest mining project over possible environmental damage; company responds​

Residents of the province of San Juan oppose GoldQuest's Romero mining project, alleging that the development of the project can damage the environment, particularly the water sources in the area. The Academy of Sciences has also expressed opposition to the installation of the mine. The complete allegations are only available in Spanish here. Business & Human Rights Resource Center invited GoldQuest to respond; the response is available below

 
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JD Jones

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Is this the same Felix Bautista who was named one of the most corrupt individuals in the world by Transparency International? That Felix Bautista is a legend in both the DR and Haiti.........and his visa to the US was canceled/revoked.

Respectfully,
Playacaribe2
One and the same.
 
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Yourmaninvegas

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Is this the same Felix Bautista who was named one of the most corrupt individuals in the world by Transparency International? That Felix Bautista is a legend in both the DR and Haiti.........and his visa to the US was canceled/revoked.

Respectfully,
Playacaribe2
And what does that have to do with the environmental effect that a major mining operation will have?
Exactly, how do the alleged actions of Senator Felix Bautista play into to this ❓
 

Yourmaninvegas

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Following the logic being proffered here any official in the Dominican Government that opposes this project is "not in on the deal". And by inference...:unsure:

"Cash rules everything around me". - Wu Tang Clan
Follow the money 🤑
 

Big

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How such a corrupt individual stays in the party I do not understand. Money is power I guess. As far as Goldquest and Romero are concerned, the mine plan that is envisioned does not plan on using any cyanide at all.
sure! they are going to "'wish" the gold out of the ore. Thiosulfate leaching is a feel-good alternative to cyanide. Cyanide is used in gold mining all over the world, including Finland. Not to get too deep into chemistry, it's not the cyanide that causes concerns from mining but its byproducts
 

Yourmaninvegas

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Effects of Gold Mining on the Environment​

View of illegal gold mining operations found by authorities in the Amazon lowlands of Peru

•••
Updated October 20, 2021
By Sarah Cairoli
Reviewed by: Sylvie Tremblay, M.Sc. Molecular Biology and Genetics
Gold has been a popular and valuable component of jewelry for centuries, but what is the environmental impact of gold mining? Gold is resistant to solvents, doesn't tarnish and is incredibly malleable, so it can be shaped with relative ease. Although its price fluctuates, gold regularly sells for more than $1,000 per ounce. Gold nuggets are popular among collectors but are rare; most gold is found as small particles buried in gold ore. However, mining just an ounce of gold from ore can result in 20 tons of solid waste and significant mercury and cyanide contamination.

Water Contamination from Gold Mining​

Some gold can be found by panning in rivers; heavy gold will remain in the pan, whereas less dense rocks and minerals float out. This small-scale form of gold mining has little effect on the body of water, but the large-scale practice of mining gold from ore can have tremendous negative effects on water quality.
Gold typically sits in ore and sediment that contains toxins such as mercury. When rivers are dredged to mine large placer deposits of gold, these toxins float downstream and enter the food web, as they have done in California's South Yuba River, according to the United States Geological Survey.

Poisoned Drinking Water
Water contamination negatively affects not only wildlife populations but also human populations. Two open-pit gold mines in Montana closed in 1998 but continue to cost the state's taxpayers millions of dollars in reclamation and water-treatment efforts.
Cyanide used at these mines to leach gold from ore resulted in such high levels of pollution that people cannot use nearby water resources until they have been subjected to extensive and expensive treatment and purification. Reclamation efforts at the former mines are expected to continue indefinitely.

Destruction of Habitat​

Most forms of gold mining involve moving massive amounts of soil and rock, which can be detrimental to the surrounding wildlife habitat. The United States Environmental Protection Agency estimates that the development of a proposed gold and copper mine in Alaska's Bristol Bay would destroy at least 24 miles of streams that support the world's largest sockeye salmon fishery.
Thousands of acres of wetlands and ponds would also be destroyed by the proposed mine's daily operations. Local communities depend heavily on this fishery and would be affected by this habitat destruction.

Risks and Accidents​

Regular operations at gold mines adversely affect the environment in several ways. For example, the operation of large mining equipment requires fuel and results in the emission of greenhouse gases. However, potential mine accidents and leaks pose an even greater threat to nearby land and water resources.
Contaminated tailings, or waste ore, need to be stored behind a dam; failure of such a structure would result in the widespread release of toxins. Mines must operate wastewater treatment plants to remove cyanide, mercury and other toxins from the water used for mining, and a treatment plant failure could also result in catastrophic contamination of the surrounding landscape.

Air Pollution from Mining​

Unfortunately, mercury used in artisanal and small-scale gold mining operations can become airborne, polluting both the air and the water. Methods for mercury-free gold mining are being developed and promoted to reduce the amount of mercury pollution produced by gold mining.
Also, sodium cyanide is often used in gold mining operations to extract gold from ore. Sodium cyanide is another chemical compound that can pollute the air and water when it is not properly contained.
The machines used to mine the earth for gold are often powered by fossil fuels, adding to the air pollution produced by the gold mining industry. Overall, the effects of gold mining on the environment – water, air and land – are serious and extremely negative.


And you were saying...
 

JD Jones

Moderator - Covid 19 in DR & North Coast
Jan 7, 2016
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Effects of Gold Mining on the Environment​

View of illegal gold mining operations found by authorities in the Amazon lowlands of Peru

•••


And you were saying...
I don't know what the source was for your post, but that's exactly what we were talking about in the other mining thread.

I don't trust these mining folks to do things the right way.
 

D'Arcy (Apostropheman)

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Apr 10, 2022
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Here and there
I don't know what the source was for your post, but that's exactly what we were talking about in the other mining thread.

I don't trust these mining folks to do things the right way.

I'ma have to start teaching classes, for those that can afford the tuition! LOL :p
 
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irishpaddy

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And what does that have to do with the environmental effect that a major mining operation will have?
Exactly, how do the alleged actions of Senator Felix Bautista play into to this ❓
in my opinion felix b. has as much concern with the enviroment as he does with going back to work at the bodega in NY where he worked .Before he hit numerous lottos in DR
 

westcan

Member
Sep 10, 2008
183
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Effects of Gold Mining on the Environment​

View of illegal gold mining operations found by authorities in the Amazon lowlands of Peru

•••
Updated October 20, 2021
By Sarah Cairoli
Reviewed by: Sylvie Tremblay, M.Sc. Molecular Biology and Genetics
Gold has been a popular and valuable component of jewelry for centuries, but what is the environmental impact of gold mining? Gold is resistant to solvents, doesn't tarnish and is incredibly malleable, so it can be shaped with relative ease. Although its price fluctuates, gold regularly sells for more than $1,000 per ounce. Gold nuggets are popular among collectors but are rare; most gold is found as small particles buried in gold ore. However, mining just an ounce of gold from ore can result in 20 tons of solid waste and significant mercury and cyanide contamination.

Water Contamination from Gold Mining​

Some gold can be found by panning in rivers; heavy gold will remain in the pan, whereas less dense rocks and minerals float out. This small-scale form of gold mining has little effect on the body of water, but the large-scale practice of mining gold from ore can have tremendous negative effects on water quality.
Gold typically sits in ore and sediment that contains toxins such as mercury. When rivers are dredged to mine large placer deposits of gold, these toxins float downstream and enter the food web, as they have done in California's South Yuba River, according to the United States Geological Survey.

Poisoned Drinking Water
Water contamination negatively affects not only wildlife populations but also human populations. Two open-pit gold mines in Montana closed in 1998 but continue to cost the state's taxpayers millions of dollars in reclamation and water-treatment efforts.
Cyanide used at these mines to leach gold from ore resulted in such high levels of pollution that people cannot use nearby water resources until they have been subjected to extensive and expensive treatment and purification. Reclamation efforts at the former mines are expected to continue indefinitely.

Destruction of Habitat​

Most forms of gold mining involve moving massive amounts of soil and rock, which can be detrimental to the surrounding wildlife habitat. The United States Environmental Protection Agency estimates that the development of a proposed gold and copper mine in Alaska's Bristol Bay would destroy at least 24 miles of streams that support the world's largest sockeye salmon fishery.
Thousands of acres of wetlands and ponds would also be destroyed by the proposed mine's daily operations. Local communities depend heavily on this fishery and would be affected by this habitat destruction.

Risks and Accidents​

Regular operations at gold mines adversely affect the environment in several ways. For example, the operation of large mining equipment requires fuel and results in the emission of greenhouse gases. However, potential mine accidents and leaks pose an even greater threat to nearby land and water resources.
Contaminated tailings, or waste ore, need to be stored behind a dam; failure of such a structure would result in the widespread release of toxins. Mines must operate wastewater treatment plants to remove cyanide, mercury and other toxins from the water used for mining, and a treatment plant failure could also result in catastrophic contamination of the surrounding landscape.

Air Pollution from Mining​

Unfortunately, mercury used in artisanal and small-scale gold mining operations can become airborne, polluting both the air and the water. Methods for mercury-free gold mining are being developed and promoted to reduce the amount of mercury pollution produced by gold mining.
Also, sodium cyanide is often used in gold mining operations to extract gold from ore. Sodium cyanide is another chemical compound that can pollute the air and water when it is not properly contained.
The machines used to mine the earth for gold are often powered by fossil fuels, adding to the air pollution produced by the gold mining industry. Overall, the effects of gold mining on the environment – water, air and land – are serious and extremely negative.


And you were saying...
You are being disingenuous. This is a photo of the mess left behind by illicit mining in Peru.
I dont understand the arguments presented against the use of cyanide in the proposed mining model of Romero You know why? BECAUSE THERE IS NO CYANIDE TO BE USED IN THE MINING IF THAT TYPE OF DEPOSIT.
 
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Yourmaninvegas

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Feb 16, 2016
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You are being disingenuous. This is a photo of the mess left behind by illicit mining in Peru.
I dont understand the arguments presented against the use of cyanide in the proposed mining model of Romero You know why? BECAUSE THERE IS NO CYANIDE TO BE USED IN THE MINING IF THAT TYPE OF DEPOSIT.
Ad hominem logical fallacy in bold‼️
to whom was that propaganda directed. lol
Listening to someone vested in gold mining and defending it is like asking a barber if you need a haircut! LOL
I don't trust these mining folks to do things the right way.
Ignoring the ad hominem logical fallacy that you made ... @westcan would you care to support your assertion with something other than your opinion ❓

The argument I make is that the location of it the proposed mine is in an environmentally sensitive area and should reviewed carefully using science. The article I posted was sharing general information.

Disingenuous - not candid or sincere, typically by pretending that one knows less about something than one really does.

Does not apply in my case as I am being very candid and sincere. And you did not address the true argument I have made from my very first post in this thread.