Senator Felix Bautista opposes Goldquest gold mine in San Juan de la Maguana province

bob saunders

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I wonder how many posters would be all for the gold mine if it was in THEIR back yard.......
I wouldn't have a problem with it. I grew up close to a gold mine. If a proper environmental assessment is made and the company follows all the regulation and rules, then yes environmental risks will be limited.
 

Yourmaninvegas

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I wonder how many posters would be all for the gold mine if it was in THEIR back yard.......
Curious.
Did someone grow up with close to a gold mine in the Dominican Republic ❓

This gold mine is being proposed in the 🇩🇴 .
And the individuals that live close to it are opposed to it.

That is what is important.
At least to me.

To others...well maybe it is 💰
🤑

Will the company follow all the regulations and rules❓
If not the environmental risks will NOT be limited.
 

bob saunders

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Curious.
Did someone grow up with close to a gold mine in the Dominican Republic ❓

This gold mine is being proposed in the 🇩🇴 .
And the individuals that live close to it are opposed to it.

That is what is important.
At least to me.

To others...well maybe it is 💰
🤑

Will the company follow all the regulations and rules❓
If not the environmental risks will NOT be limited.
Actually the people that live close to it are not opposed to it. They are in favor of it.
 

NanSanPedro

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Actually the people that live close to it are not opposed to it. They are in favor of it.

If I had to guess, and obviously I am doing just that, I would say they'd be in favor of it. Jobs, jobs, jobs. Muy importante!
 

Yourmaninvegas

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"Miners in Dominican Republic defend projects amid environmental opposition​

BnamericasPublished: Friday, October 07, 2022
Politics Environmental conflict Gold Licensing & Concessions
Miners in Dominican Republic defend projects amid environmental opposition

Mining companies in the Dominican Republic are grappling with an upsurge in resistance as they seek a path forward for key growth projects.
Companies in the Caribbean nation – which hosts Latin America’s biggest gold mine, Pueblo Viejo – have accumulated gold resources of around 31Moz, as well as deposits of nickel and copper.
Despite support for the industry from President Luis Abinader, project development has been held back by permitting delays amid strong opposition from environmental campaigners, residents and church and political leaders.
But companies have defended their projects, outlining plans to mitigate environmental impacts and improve water resources, while highlighting the industry’s economic importance.
Abinader has pledged to deliver mining growth, but permitting decisions have been put off and a proposed overhaul of legislation aimed at attracting investment has failed to advance.
ROMERO CONCERNS
Authorities have faced increasing pressure to block GoldQuest Mining’s Romero project in San Juan province (pictured).
The US$159mn gold asset has been delayed for several years due to the lack of presidential approval of an exploitation permit.
In the latest development, San Juan senator Félix Bautista presented a draft bill calling for the creation of a nature reserve covering 31 communities and 25,722ha of land within the Romero concessions, in an attempt to block the project’s progress.
Bautista, of the left-wing Fuerza del Pueblo party, previously urged Abinader not to grant a permit for the project due to environmental concerns.
Operations at Romero would pollute water resources used for human consumption and agriculture, with local waterways feeding into at least three reservoirs, according to Bautista.
A local NGO, called the southeast united committee for water and life, comprising church leaders, academics and agricultural associations, has also called for the project to be halted, warning it would be ‘catastrophic’ for the region, local news outlet CDN reported last month."


"Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not their own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan
 

NanSanPedro

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"Miners in Dominican Republic defend projects amid environmental opposition​

BnamericasPublished: Friday, October 07, 2022
Politics Environmental conflict Gold Licensing & Concessions
Miners in Dominican Republic defend projects amid environmental opposition

Mining companies in the Dominican Republic are grappling with an upsurge in resistance as they seek a path forward for key growth projects.
Companies in the Caribbean nation – which hosts Latin America’s biggest gold mine, Pueblo Viejo – have accumulated gold resources of around 31Moz, as well as deposits of nickel and copper.
Despite support for the industry from President Luis Abinader, project development has been held back by permitting delays amid strong opposition from environmental campaigners, residents and church and political leaders.
But companies have defended their projects, outlining plans to mitigate environmental impacts and improve water resources, while highlighting the industry’s economic importance.
Abinader has pledged to deliver mining growth, but permitting decisions have been put off and a proposed overhaul of legislation aimed at attracting investment has failed to advance.
ROMERO CONCERNS
Authorities have faced increasing pressure to block GoldQuest Mining’s Romero project in San Juan province (pictured).
The US$159mn gold asset has been delayed for several years due to the lack of presidential approval of an exploitation permit.
In the latest development, San Juan senator Félix Bautista presented a draft bill calling for the creation of a nature reserve covering 31 communities and 25,722ha of land within the Romero concessions, in an attempt to block the project’s progress.
Bautista, of the left-wing Fuerza del Pueblo party, previously urged Abinader not to grant a permit for the project due to environmental concerns.
Operations at Romero would pollute water resources used for human consumption and agriculture, with local waterways feeding into at least three reservoirs, according to Bautista.
A local NGO, called the southeast united committee for water and life, comprising church leaders, academics and agricultural associations, has also called for the project to be halted, warning it would be ‘catastrophic’ for the region, local news outlet CDN reported last month."


"Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not their own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan
It says residents. That means ≥ 2. It does not say a majority of residents.
 

Yourmaninvegas

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Feb 16, 2016
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It says residents. That means ≥ 2. It does not say a majority of residents.
You are correct. 👏🕺💃

The article published October 7, 2022 did not say a majority of residents oppose the project.

My post was designed to provide value, insight and another view.
It was not posted to split hairs or engage in semantics nor was it designed to stir up trouble.
I will allow the article to speak for itself when it comes to overall opposition.
And I have no problems with the opinions of others who strongly express support of gold mining proposals in the 🇩🇴 .
💥
 

bob saunders

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Jan 1, 2002
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"Miners in Dominican Republic defend projects amid environmental opposition​

BnamericasPublished: Friday, October 07, 2022
Politics Environmental conflict Gold Licensing & Concessions
Miners in Dominican Republic defend projects amid environmental opposition

Mining companies in the Dominican Republic are grappling with an upsurge in resistance as they seek a path forward for key growth projects.
Companies in the Caribbean nation – which hosts Latin America’s biggest gold mine, Pueblo Viejo – have accumulated gold resources of around 31Moz, as well as deposits of nickel and copper.
Despite support for the industry from President Luis Abinader, project development has been held back by permitting delays amid strong opposition from environmental campaigners, residents and church and political leaders.
But companies have defended their projects, outlining plans to mitigate environmental impacts and improve water resources, while highlighting the industry’s economic importance.
Abinader has pledged to deliver mining growth, but permitting decisions have been put off and a proposed overhaul of legislation aimed at attracting investment has failed to advance.
ROMERO CONCERNS
Authorities have faced increasing pressure to block GoldQuest Mining’s Romero project in San Juan province (pictured).
The US$159mn gold asset has been delayed for several years due to the lack of presidential approval of an exploitation permit.
In the latest development, San Juan senator Félix Bautista presented a draft bill calling for the creation of a nature reserve covering 31 communities and 25,722ha of land within the Romero concessions, in an attempt to block the project’s progress.
Bautista, of the left-wing Fuerza del Pueblo party, previously urged Abinader not to grant a permit for the project due to environmental concerns.
Operations at Romero would pollute water resources used for human consumption and agriculture, with local waterways feeding into at least three reservoirs, according to Bautista.
A local NGO, called the southeast united committee for water and life, comprising church leaders, academics and agricultural associations, has also called for the project to be halted, warning it would be ‘catastrophic’ for the region, local news outlet CDN reported last month."


"Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not their own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan
Well, you have presented opinions but not facts.
 

Yourmaninvegas

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Feb 16, 2016
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"Authorities have faced increasing pressure to block GoldQuest Mining’s Romero project in San Juan province.
The US$159mn gold asset has been delayed for several years due to the lack of presidential approval of an exploitation permit.
In the latest development, San Juan senator Félix Bautista presented a draft bill calling for the creation of a nature reserve covering 31 communities and 25,722ha of land within the Romero concessions, in an attempt to block the project’s progress.
Bautista, of the left-wing Fuerza del Pueblo party, previously urged Abinader not to grant a permit for the project due to environmental concerns.
"
Fact -
  1. a thing that is known or proved to be true.
    "he ignores some historical and economic facts"
    • information used as evidence or as part of a report or news article.
      "even the most inventive journalism peters out without facts, and in this case there were no facts"

    • LAW
      the truth about events as opposed to interpretation.
      "there was a question of fact as to whether they had received the letter"
"Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not their own facts." - Daniel Patrick Moynihan
Not everyone understands the difference between a fact and opinion.
For those that do...my apologies.
 

bob saunders

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Jan 1, 2002
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Fact -
  1. a thing that is known or proved to be true.
    "he ignores some historical and economic facts"
    • information used as evidence or as part of a report or news article.
      "even the most inventive journalism peters out without facts, and in this case there were no facts"

    • LAW
      the truth about events as opposed to interpretation.
      "there was a question of fact as to whether they had received the letter"

Not everyone understands the difference between a fact and opinion.
For those that do...my apologies.
I remember way back in the 1980s protestors protesting the cutting of old growth forest on Vancouver Island. They didnt even know that most of the trees being logged were second growth trees planted by the forestry. Same as those supporting electrical vechicles, they dont have to drive 50 plus miles to work or own a transport truck. Those protesting this mine are clueless about whether the risks can be mitigated, and they could care less about all the unemployed locals. Carry out the enironmental study then make a decision.
 
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Yourmaninvegas

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I remember way back in the 1980s protestors protesting the cutting of old growth forest on Vancouver Island. They didnt even know that most of the trees being logged were second growth trees planted by the forestry. Same as those supporting electrical vechicles, they dont have to drive 50 plus miles to work or own a transport truck.
Irrelevant to the discussion of this project.
Those protesting this mine are clueless about whether the risks can be mitigated, and they could care less about all the unemployed locals.
I understand that is your opinion.
I don't agree with it.
But we are allowed to do that here are we not?
Carry out the enironmental study then make a decision.
I agree that that a proper independent environmental (yes, that I how I think you spell the word in English) impact study backed by facts and peer reviewed should be carried out.
And then yes, at that point the decision makers will have better information than just opinions to work with.
 

CristoRey

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According to the article:
"Cyanide diluted with huge amounts of water is often used to separate gold from the ore extracted from mines, creating potential hazards to drinking water, ecology and farming. Goldquest opted instead for a physical method of isolating the gold that is more costly, but less risky."

Perhaps the locals prefer quality of life over promises.
 

Big

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whenever anyone hears the word "cyanide" they get their patties in a bunch. It's used in everything! Cosmetics, pharmaceuticals and on and on. It happens to be the cheapest way to get gold out of low-grade ore. If the cost is too high the mine will not operate. Which translates to less tax revenue, less jobs etc.
 

bob saunders

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According to the article:
"Cyanide diluted with huge amounts of water is often used to separate gold from the ore extracted from mines, creating potential hazards to drinking water, ecology and farming. Goldquest opted instead for a physical method of isolating the gold that is more costly, but less risky."

Perhaps the locals prefer quality of life over promises.
Plenty of the locals, especially where the mine is going to be located are in favor of the mine. So, since Goldquest is not using cyanide the mention of it is irrelevant, correct. Bautista is probably upset because they haven't offered him a bribe. So--underground mine, no use of river water, no use of cyanide, mechanical extraction/separation of gold from the rock.
 

CristoRey

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Plenty of the locals, especially where the mine is going to be located are in favor of the mine. So, since Goldquest is not using cyanide the mention of it is irrelevant, correct. Bautista is probably upset because they haven't offered him a bribe. So--underground mine, no use of river water, no use of cyanide, mechanical extraction/separation of gold from the rock.
I think it's both. The community doesn't want it and the fella who used to bag
groceries at a bodega in NYC isn't getting a cut of the action.
 
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Big

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I've never been there, don't know anyone who's from
there or lives there and no dog in the fight so may their
wishes (whatever they may be) come true..
to say it's in the middle of nowhere is an understatement. There is a quaint little town there with a church and a few mom-and-pop hotels.