shipping luxury motorbike to DR; TAXES ; COSTS ETC

niceguy

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Aug 6, 2011
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Hi
im thinking of shipping my motorbike (which would be classed as a luxury item) from the US to my residence in the DR. Its value is $15000.00us
I have permanent residency?
Has anyone done this?
if i have all documents to prove its value will that be of assistance, potentially freeing me from customs wanting more taxes paid etc?
rate of tax?

cost to transfer from Miami, via ship?

Any other pitfalls.

cheers hope someone can help
 

cobraboy

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Jul 24, 2004
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Figure on paying around 53+% plus shipping on the current retail value.

Figure on doing the scrounging for parts and wrenching yourself.
 

niceguy

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Aug 6, 2011
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if its a custom bike. And i have all retail documents listing its purchase price, is this the information customs will base their 53% tax on.??? many thanks
 

niceguy

New member
Aug 6, 2011
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Figure on paying around 53+% plus shipping on the current retail value.

Figure on doing the scrounging for parts and wrenching yourself.
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if its a custom bike. And i have all retail documents listing its purchase price, is this the information customs will base their 53% tax on.??? many thanks​
 

Castellamonte

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Mar 3, 2005
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Taxes are calculated on the retail value as determined by DGII in their version of a "blue book." If you tell them about all the customizations you will just have to pay more so I'd keep mum on those.

Oh yeah, if they are really cool looking customizations that can be removed and might look cool on a Dominican moto you may loose them in transit.

I would remove them and ship them as "parts" in a separate shipment to reassemble when they get here.
 

cobraboy

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if its a custom bike. And i have all retail documents listing its purchase price, is this the information customs will base their 53% tax on.??? many thanks​
The highest value they can justify. It rarely will work in your favor.

Consider hiring an import agent.
 

william webster

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Jan 16, 2009
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Find a car importer... a bike is still a vehicle and they know the boys "on the dock".

Pay them a fee to get a lower assessment and smooth importing.

Just an Idea
 

MikeFisher

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my Dad took care about my own Custom Built Bike back home for 3 years+ when I settled down here on the Isle, then I understood that it will be much cheaper (and of course much more hasslefree) to build a new Custom down here than to bring the own one over here. I sold the Bike at home but never started a new one down here.
my bike showed in the Papers(Matricula) at home My Name as the Builder/Brand, so it would not have shown up on any Blue Book, means they would take a superexpensive Bike from their Blue Book and add for my Unique one some "Extra Value", simply not worth it.
btw,
as a Bikler, spend some Time here on the Island in the Area where you plan to Live firstly, and decide Then if you still want to Bike on regular Bases and if a very expensively imported Custom Bike is needed for those ventures.

I finally decided that NOT.
if I want to Bike I take a locally available Bike, simple Rent including Insurance etc, hassle free, inexpensive.
I biked whole western Europe and most of northern Africa, very wide parts of the USA and the streets and surroundings in the DR where I live since 18years do not appeal to Bike around since many years, simply not worth it.

check it out here locally firstly and then make your decision, but do not bring your custom bike.
if it's really worth 15K at home, sell it for 10K there and that save's you a lot of money, as you would never get not even 5K here on the Island for it.

Mike
 

belgiank

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Jun 13, 2009
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I have to agree with Mike.

It is not a pleasant experience to drive a car here. You have to look out for everything, as nobody follows the rules here. I used to drive 800 to a 1000km a day in Europe, and got out of the car relaxed. Here I drive 80 km to STI, and I am tired.

Take into account that the rule of the strongest, biggest is the only rule which is applied. A truck or bus, then the guaguas, then the SUV's, then the cars, and only then a bike. The taxi's have their own rules, which are very simple. I will slam my brakes to stop, without warning. I will overtake you from the left, the right, or if necessary over you. There is no such road as a 2-lane. It will easily fit 4 cars. Taxis are not allowed to have working lights, or shocks.

I used to love my Honda VFR800, and I still miss it. Sometimes I get the craving to import one, or to try and buy one here. Then common sense takes over again.

The only bike to ride here, maybe, is a Harley Tractorson. Mind you, I do not consider that a bike, and it will get stolen the first time you stop to get an ice-cream.

Do what I do, and stick to the trusted 125cc here. And keep your eyes open, at all times. Even the ones on the back of your head.

BelgianK
 

MikeFisher

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there is only one way to have fun in the traffick on the Isle, and that is My way, to drive a strong Truck with a real Defense on the Front and not to worry about some scratches on the sides once in a while as results of extra Fun.
for anything else you need appropriate Roads and to be surrounded by Traffic educated drivers, not available here.

Mike
 

Castellamonte

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Agreed. We had two Indians in the US we wanted to import when we moved here. After watching the Dominican traffic and how they maintain the roads we decided it would be better to learn to play Russian roulette.

Driving in the Dominican Republic is very much akin to a video game...without an endless supply of lives. You either make it or you don't. I don't like those odds when driving a motorcycle.
 

cobraboy

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I'm going to respectfully disagree with the dangers of riding a bike here.

I now have personally logged over 25,000 miles on a motorcycle in the DR since '09 when I took over Lead Rider duties for MotoCaribe.

First of all we wrote an ebook about riding motorcycles in the DR, Two Wheels in Paradise. You can get a free copy HERE in .epub, .mobi (Kindle), .pdf or .doc. German is available if you specify.

There is one primary reason that IMO riding in the DR is much safer than riding in the US: here you are seen. There are no soccer moms in the mini van, texting, applying mascara and throwing McDonald's at screaming kids in the back seat. The #1 reason for accidents between cars and motorcycles in the US is "I didn't see him." That virtually doesn't exist here. And every Dominican either owns a moto or their parents/sibling, cousin, uncle, friend owns a moto. There are roughly 2.5 million registered vehicles in the DR; around 1.6-.18 million are motos. Motos are in the majority here, not 4-wheeled vehicles.

I have seen actuarial stats on motorcycle accidents in the DR, provided by the insurance cartel and DR public health ministry. The VAST majority of moto accidents happen in the DR because of:

  1. Drinking while riding a moto
  2. Acting like a fool on a moto

The degree of injury is exacerbated because of:

  1. No helmet
  2. No riding gear
  3. No real formal training; Dominicans are afraid to use the front brake for the myth they will "be thrown over the bars." 70% of any motorcycles stopping power is in the front brake. Dominicans use rear brakes in every situation-including panic-and that causes a bike to drop in a heartbeat as soon as the rear brake locks in ~any~ position but perfectly straight, slow and balanced. I know of which I speak because I screwed up royally once and locked the rear down after chopping power...and went down hard and fast without warning...BOOM! Gear saved my a$$, but I was still sore and bruised and with a cracked rib and twisted ankle.

Having said that, I DO NOT advise tourists and expats to ride a moto in the DR UNLESS you have a lot of riding experience and training. I HIGHLY recommend finding the Motorcycle Safety Foundation accredited near your US home and take the weekend Basic Riders Course. Their website: Motorcycle Safety Foundation

Another REQUIREMENT of riding the DR on a motorcycle SAFELY is to forget the riding culture where you come from and adapt to the road culture here. You are the foreign body here, and it's up to you to adapt or crash; your choice. To do otherwise if dangerous and foolish. We go over this in TWIP in great detail.
 

MikeFisher

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Robert,
agreement on some of your points, I have to softly disagree with a few important points, too.

Here we have quiet a Bunch of Moms and Dads texting while driving,
they do so driving 2 wheels, 4 wheels and 18 wheels and they bring danger and dead to their surroundings,
as we are here on the Island the same dumb educated drivers without a brain as they are in the USA or in Europe on average.
25K of Miles on a Bike in DR since 09 is a remarkable number, congratulations on staying safe on each single mile.
I can not count my own miles I drove in Europe and the US during Decades,
I never had anything bad to happen to me ,
still both leggs on and my head the same nuts as it been given by birth,
but as fact many thousands+ did loose their lifes during the same timeperiod on the same roads, they've been not any less driving educated than I am, so I take it as the luck of the draw.
I am usually a total and even violent DR Defender when it comes to some Gringos trying to tell us what we do wrong and why we are so dangerous,
but when it comes to the theme Driving in DR Traffick on 2 Wheels without a 200 Kilo Fender Bender in front of a Truck, then I clearly tend to tell folks to:
* wanna drive in the DR, buy a Truck, and not a new one
* wanna have scenic safe drives on 2 wheels, take the US Countryside or the German Black Forrest Roads instead

little examples out of your Correct stats shown above:
* riding under the influence of alcohol
that's true, but the same amount of 4-WHEEL Drivers also ride under that darn influence, and YOU as the Biker are the defenseless target when the 2 hit
* no formal Training
that's also absolutely correct, but the same way the 4 wheel drivers riding the same road do not have any of real Driving education/formal training etc, so who stays on da ground/2 leggs less/goes to heck when a educated Biker and a 'usual' Truck Driver meet in da middle of da road?

your stats are right,
and the only recommendation to Bikers is to Bike somewhere else,
this Island is anyways too small to provide many months or years of scenic new Biking Ventures.

no hard feelings,
but over all I disagree

Mike
 

cobraboy

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no hard feelings,
but over all I disagree

Mike
Mike, come on tour with me for a week and your opinion might change.

I'll also add that we avoid congested areas and suburbs like the plague. That makes a difference. Besides, what the fun riding in congestion?

We have highly experienced riders come on our tours, some of the most skilled riders on the planet, many senior MSF instructors, no newbs and folks just learning. And to a person, they all agree that when you adapt to the unwritten Rules of the Road here they feel much safer than back in the states. I explain it in TWIP.

It's ALL about risk mitigation and management.

But, yes, a drunk driver can kill you. So stay off the roads at twilight and weekends and you've just reduced the odds by a huge %.

And keep your head on a swivel. When I ride I have a 12-6-2 second scan....looking for possible threats 12, 6 & 2 seconds from me, and a basic "out" should the poop hit the fan. Is it perfect? No. But it does make me much more aware, and that's important.

The more you practice these techniques, the better and safer your riding becomes. Besides: I don't ride to be safe; I am safe while I ride. I could no more not ride motersickels than DR1 Robert could stop pimping Apple.:knockedou

I'd love to hear frank12's comments, because he's the most experienced rider of Dominican roads on big bikes here on Dr1 besides myself.

Woody Allen said:
I'm not afraid of dying. I just don't want to be there when it happens...
 

MikeFisher

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I could no more not ride motersickels than DR1 Robert could stop pimping Apple.:knockedou

agreed, lol.
but I will still leave the Rides to the visits of Europe and stay on da darn Truck within DR Soil, or better on da Boat, less danger to get hit, ha ha.

safe and enjoyful Rides

Mike
 

cobraboy

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One more comment:

There is a substantial difference on several levels between a moto (small displacement) and a motorcycle. My comments are about the latter.

The Unwritten Rules of the Roads state that the slower you are, the more to the right you should be. Therefore animals and pedestrians are far right, often walking on the shoulder when traffic is present, small pasolas are next, then motos, then large vehicles.

A moto is not as fast as a car unless driver all-out, downhill with a wind to your back. They aren't designed for that. Yes, some will, but they are largely uncontrolled at that point, with tires and brakes unable, physically, to counter forces that are necessary for controlled emergency actions, momentum vs. friction.

A motorcycle (like our 650cc/62hp/450lb. V-Stroms) are as fast or faster than almost every vehicle on the road, and have tires and brakes even more capable than cars do. Also: the lights are ALWAYS on, a design factor that cannot be overridden without electrical modification.

A motorcycle travels with the same "Rules" as a car does. Motos and scooters do not.

Speed, maneuverability and performance makes a huge difference in safety when traveling with larger vehicles. An experienced rider understands this and rides accordingly.
 

frank12

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Sep 6, 2011
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Everyone here brings up good points, but i would just like to say that there is no other place in the world more fun, more majestic, and more scenic than driving a motorcycle here in the DR. I have motorcycles in Norway and drive everywhere--and although the scenery is amazing up in the mountains and in the countryside, over all, in comparison to the DR, it is sterile!! In Norway, it's cold when its overcast, freezing when its raining, and it sucks whenever the weather is not conducive to being outdoors. Not so in the Caribbean. Here you can drive 12 months out of the year and enjoy the fantastic weather and enjoy 50 to 80 miles to the galloon--depending what kind of bike you have. This comes in handy when a galloon of gas approaches $6.

The DR offers the adventure motorcyclists a plethora of intoxicating sights and smells--everything from amazing wild blooming flowers that line the mountain sides to the dead animals that sit alongside the road cooking and baking in the midday sun. the mountains are nothing short of breathtaking--yes, breathtaking!! And this goes for the valleys as well--all of the valleys are majestic and full of amazing fauna and draping flowers and intoxicating colors, which, when sitting in the confines of a car--you miss it all becuase they go by in an air-conditioned blur.

You can enjoy these stimuli on just about any motorcycle out there, but something like Robert's "Dual-sport" bikes are the best for the job. and the reason is simple--the roads here go from pavement to dirt to craters so large that many people have fallen into them and not come out for three days. For this reason and more you want a bike that offers "lots" of suspension and "lots" of forgiveness on the rear end. Harleys and other sports bikes don't offer this kind of plush ride that not only can save your rear end from looking like road rash but also absorb the pot holes and small children that you will inevitably drive over. I kid, i kid.

Back to economics and practicality. you can explore so much more on a motorcycle that a car cannot get to here on this island---everything from Las Galeras to playa Fronton to playa Rincon--and many more hard to get to beaches--instantly become accessible on a motorcycle. this is also true for all the mountain roads throughout the Cibao Valley, the south east corner outside of Barahona, the northwest corner--near the Haitian border, and many other places that will tear out the bottom of your car. Yes, a jeep would do fine in these areas, but, this is taking half the fun out of exploring remote villages and places--including crossing small rivers and streams.

The DR is the Mother-of-all motorcyclist adventure dreams! It would behove anyone here to put aside your fears and grab some basic gear protection, and get out there and explore and enjoy the amazing scenery this beautiful island offers. Motorcyclists around the world would give their left nut to be able to come down here and explore this island on a motorcycle--enjoying the twisting and curvy mountain roads we have throughout the island. Instead, 99% of the world's motorcyclist are trapped in their countries tied-down by a mountain of rules and regulations and laws that prevent them from enjoying anything but a sterile riding experience where any deviation off the norm will get your license revoked and your insurance esculated into the upper ends of the hemisphere.

For those of you living here, and having previously owned motorcycles in your host country, it's nothing short of a crime that you are not taking advantage of the unique opportunity to get out and explore this island. there are beautiful girls everywhere on this island, but none are more beautiful than in the small mountain villages scattered throughout the island. take my advice--i'm a doctor--and leave your wife and girlfriend at home with the gardner or pool cleaner, and get out there and meet the cream of the crop of the female species. forget the city girls that have been spoiled by western ways, get out there and explore the island. Otherwise, what's the point of being here?

It would behove anyone here to take Cobraboy's advice and go up to Jarabacoa and take a ride with him; he's got 20 "dual-sport" bikes--all of them made for the crazy conditions of this island.

Now get out there and ride. Chicks dig scars!

Love Frank
 
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