Shock - Required Return Ticket if no residency

King in the North

King in the North
Jul 7, 2020
15
11
3
Cabarete
Not sure if this has come up recently, but we received quite a shock when we checked in for a flight from the US (Orlando) to Puerto Plata on AA. At the ticket counter as we were checking in the agent told us that, since we did not have DR Residency, we had to purchase a return ticket to the US. A supervisor checked that somewhere and confirmed the requirement. We have traveled the same route four (4) times in the last year and can prove we never had to purchase a mandatory return ticket. We don't have residency and often returned in less than 30 days from POP to Miami. So, unless it's a brand new regulation, AA was negligent in not enforcing the regulation before yesterday and was egregiously negligent in not telling us at the time of booking of the requirement that a return ticket was required. So, future travelers beware. They did promise a refund after our request for one but this Kabuki dance isn't fun when traveling.
 
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drstock

Silver
Oct 29, 2010
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This HAS come up recently, and it has always been a gamble depending on the airline and the vigilance of the person doing the check-in whether the rule is enforced. Some airlines won't allow you to buy a one-way ticket. As has been suggested before, some people buy a refundable return ticket and then cancel the return flight.
 
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windeguy

Platinum
Jul 10, 2004
38,618
3,850
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This has been a regulation for many years. Nothing new about the regulation. The only thing new is sometimes airlines are asking for the return ticket.
The airline could face severe penalties and repatriate the people without return tickets if that is discovered when they arrive in the DR and get turned back.

Still very, very rare.

The government has promised to enforce the laws as written.
 
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DR_Guy

Bronze
Feb 17, 2010
852
51
48
Not a shock.
COPA Airlines always enforces. AA busted me once about 4 years ago. I discovered that the AA kisoks arent programmed for this. So just check in to the kiosk and no worries. Also there are some sites that can give you a real reservation number for like 24 hours for like less than 10 dollars.
 

windeguy

Platinum
Jul 10, 2004
38,618
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Not a shock.
COPA Airlines always enforces. AA busted me once about 4 years ago. I discovered that the AA kisoks arent programmed for this. So just check in to the kiosk and no worries. Also there are some sites that can give you a real reservation number for like 24 hours for like less than 10 dollars.
Someone else's reservation or do they just get a reservation and just cancel it?
 

CristoRey

Welcome To Wonderland
Apr 1, 2014
9,204
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This has been a regulation for many years. Nothing new about the regulation. The only thing new is sometimes airlines are asking for the return ticket.
The airline could face severe penalties and repatriate the people without return tickets if that is discovered when they arrive in the DR and get turned back.

Still very, very rare.

The government has promised to enforce the laws as written.
Agreed.
This has been in place for several years. I had to purchase a return ticket in Ft. Lauderdale (to SDQ) back in April 2012. Without a return ticket Spirit Air was not going to allow me to board the flight.
 

windeguy

Platinum
Jul 10, 2004
38,618
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Still very sporadic enforcement of the actual requirements on all airlines to ask for a return ticket prior to boarding for tourists.
Just a few isolates cases like these.

So far....
 

CG

Bronze
Sep 16, 2004
872
46
48
Still very sporadic enforcement of the actual requirements on all airlines to ask for a return ticket prior to boarding for tourists.
Just a few isolates cases like these.

So far....
It's been sporadic for years... I was never allowed to check-in online nor at the auto kiosks in the US returning back to the DR as our tickets showed the one leg only, nowhere online or in the auto kiosks did it show we were residents & useing the return portion of the ticket. On occasion even when heading straight to the check-in counter (too much luggage) we were always obliged prove to be residents.. It's happened countless number of times over many years..
 
Feb 7, 2007
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Someone else's reservation or do they just get a reservation and just cancel it?

Actually they issue a real fully refundable ticket for a future date under your name and then they cancel it after 48/72 hours. Extended validity time is possible for a fee.






 

windeguy

Platinum
Jul 10, 2004
38,618
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Rubio, that is exactly what I thought they might do for that small fee.
And no way to catch up on that scam save one thing:

Keeping track of when that person actually left and paid an exit fine. That record is kept in the computer systems, but so far no action has been taken.
 

AlaPlaya

Frequent Flyer
Jan 7, 2021
205
125
43
Texas
Still very sporadic enforcement of the actual requirements on all airlines to ask for a return ticket prior to boarding for tourists.
Just a few isolates cases like these.

So far....
Everyone I know that has flown AA, Delta, Air Transat, West Jet, Spirit, and Frontier in last 6 months has been asked for a return ticket. No longer seems to be sporadic enforcement.
 

NALs

Polls Forum Moderator
Jan 20, 2003
10,811
1,440
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I checked in the AA website with a one way ticket from JFK to SDQ and there was no mention of a return ticket in English or in Spanish.

Then I checked in the Jetblue website for the same flight and this came up (both times) before it showed me the options.

E970ECB1-8885-4C13-9351-DE3C442DDB87.jpeg


79EAC69D-F5EE-46C9-8B1C-FA2D4AA665AF.jpeg


As has been said, this requirement has always existed. Some airlines should do a better job at letting the travelers know of its existence. The OP could have a case here agains AA (I'm not a lawyer, please consult with a lawsuit lawyer if you're planning to proceed).
 

keepcoming

Silver
May 25, 2011
2,976
271
83
The only mention of this on the AA website (under International Travel) is this: "Some countries require proof of return or onward travel, a visiting address and sufficient funds for your stay". As others have said this rule has always been there (I worked for AA) but it was always hit or miss if it was enforced.
 

SantiagoDR

Forever a Clown
Jan 12, 2006
5,580
700
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I checked in the AA website with a one way ticket from JFK to SDQ and there was no mention of a return ticket in English or in Spanish.

Then I checked in the Jetblue website for the same flight and this came up (both times) before it showed me the options.
As has been said, this requirement has always existed. Some airlines should do a better job at letting the travelers know of its existence. The OP could have a case here agains AA (I'm not a lawyer, please consult with a lawsuit lawyer if you're planning to proceed).


Return-Tikket.jpg
 
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Cdn_Gringo

Gold
Apr 29, 2014
8,579
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This is another example of the risks associated with participating in the "wild west" lifestyle. Most who operate here know the basic rules and understand that many of these rules on not enforced or are only sporadically enforced. It has to be expected that at sometime one could get caught up in a sporadic enforcement. Whether it is continuing to drive after the foreign license validity period, staying longer than 30 days on a tourist card, arriving with only a one-way air ticket, or whatever other workaround you engage in, sooner or later and usually unexpectedly the status quo changes and you have to deal with a new reality. Some choose not to gamble while checking in for a flight or at immigration on arrival and have a return ticket to show if asked for one. Others who take their chances have been forced to whip out the credit card and buy a ticket last minute.

The level of risk one chooses to accept is a personal decision. And despite the often repeated mantras, "That will never happen here", or "Nothing will change", Things usually do change to some degree eventually. A preconceived backup plan for the unexpected should be second nature for frequent visitors here - a good lawyer/influential contact on speed dial, knowledge of an available return ticket option you could purchase quickly if needed before heading to the airport with only a one-way ticket, having a second source for required meds if your usual pharmacy unexpectedly doesn't have what you need etc. Being prepared to compensate for the unexpected is a must when opting to short circuit the known rules here in the DR.
 

AlaPlaya

Frequent Flyer
Jan 7, 2021
205
125
43
Texas
I checked in the AA website with a one way ticket from JFK to SDQ and there was no mention of a return ticket in English or in Spanish.

Then I checked in the Jetblue website for the same flight and this came up (both times) before it showed me the options.

View attachment 5280

View attachment 5279

As has been said, this requirement has always existed. Some airlines should do a better job at letting the travelers know of its existence. The OP could have a case here agains AA (I'm not a lawyer, please consult with a lawsuit lawyer if you're planning to proceed).

That would be a terrible case.
 
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Gadfly

member
Jul 7, 2016
611
322
63
This is another example of the risks associated with participating in the "wild west" lifestyle. Most who operate here know the basic rules and understand that many of these rules on not enforced or are only sporadically enforced. It has to be expected that at sometime one could get caught up in a sporadic enforcement. Whether it is continuing to drive after the foreign license validity period, staying longer than 30 days on a tourist card, arriving with only a one-way air ticket, or whatever other workaround you engage in, sooner or later and usually unexpectedly the status quo changes and you have to deal with a new reality. Some choose not to gamble while checking in for a flight or at immigration on arrival and have a return ticket to show if asked for one. Others who take their chances have been forced to whip out the credit card and buy a ticket last minute.

The level of risk one chooses to accept is a personal decision. And despite the often repeated mantras, "That will never happen here", or "Nothing will change", Things usually do change to some degree eventually. A preconceived backup plan for the unexpected should be second nature for frequent visitors here - a good lawyer/influential contact on speed dial, knowledge of an available return ticket option you could purchase quickly if needed before heading to the airport with only a one-way ticket, having a second source for required meds if your usual pharmacy unexpectedly doesn't have what you need etc. Being prepared to compensate for the unexpected is a must when opting to short circuit the known rules here in the DR.
Damn the torpedoes!
Speed dial? too funny! I miss my clamshell
 

Buzzard

Active member
Feb 28, 2004
493
20
38
84
Costambar
I have being traveling to the DR from EWR on one-way tickets for the
last 10 years on United and never been asked to show a return ticket.
Go figure!