Squatters removed from Cabarete wetlands

Dolores

Administrator
Staff member
Feb 20, 2019
7,540
686
93




It took years of efforts by visionary businesspeople and environmentalists, but finally, the government is taking actions to evict invaders of protected areas in Cabarete, Puerto Plata. The Ministry of Environment enacted the Environmental Rescue Plan Phase I on 18 February 2021. It calls for the removing of illegal occupants of areas in the Monumento Natural Laguna Cabarete y Goleta (Choco). More than 200 dwellings were dismantled in the province of Puerto Plata.



The National Service for Environmental Protection (Senpa) head the operation after months of coordination that included intelligence and 10 government institutions’ backing, says Environment Minister Orlando Jorge Mera.



With the support of past local governments, the invaders had been filling in the wetlands and selling lots in Puerto Plata province. The Ministry of Environment...

Continue reading...
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Auryn

Well-known member
Apr 22, 2012
787
347
83
That's such a shame. It's hard to fathom how people could fuck others over like that.
Developed countries are often built upon this premise exactly. And they continue to operate upon this prerogative each day.

The article above seems biased to me. “Visionaries”?? What do they envision, let me ask that.

They are not invaders, they are desperate people. I’m not condoning the squatting and have said in the other thread that this was inevitable. I worked with kids from La Ciénaga several years ago and still support a charity there. I take it a bit personally when I think of those kids, they remain innocent.
 

NanSanPedro

Nickel with tin plating
Apr 12, 2019
2,152
1,756
113
you do live here.....
Sure do. But doesn't matter where here is. We are not here to take advantage of others. I don't know any of the details of those evicted, but if they were taken advantage of, then my heart goes out to them. If this was closer to me here in the south, I would do more than just blah blah on a message board.
 

NALs

Polls Forum Moderator
Jan 20, 2003
9,746
622
113
The bottom line is that the land isn't theirs and never was, plus protected. If it was theirs, then the eviction wouldn't had happened. Everything else is irrelevant, imo.
 

Yourmaninvegas

I am here to protect and serve
Feb 16, 2016
884
321
63
-
The bottom line is that the land isn't theirs and never was, plus protected. If it was theirs, then the eviction wouldn't had happened. Everything else is irrelevant, imo.
That is the problem with capitalism at it's core.
The bottom line is everything.
My problem is not the eviction.
My question is about how was it handled.
Was prior notice given❓
If people defrauded others are they being pursued legally❓ (and not some weak *** get an attorney and file suit)
All this has happened before and all this will happen again if the law is not enforced in such a way as to keep this from happening in the first place.
Capitalism is NOT a zero sum game ‼️
 

johne

Silver
Jun 28, 2003
4,358
1,036
113
That is the problem with capitalism at it's core.
The bottom line is everything.
My problem is not the eviction.
My question is about how was it handled.
Was prior notice given❓
If people defrauded others are they being pursued legally❓ (and not some weak *** get an attorney and file suit)
All this has happened before and all this will happen again if the law is not enforced in such a way as to keep this from happening in the first place.
Capitalism is NOT a zero sum game ‼️
In most cases worldwide squatters are “notified” for years on end until
the judgement day. Have you ever heard, ever, that the people that were squatting illegal moved voluntarily? I never have. Squatters don’t move because they have no place to go. In poorer countries such as the DR unfortunately, governments
Have other things on their mind. Like corruption with no oversight. DR? You bet. It’s in the history books , centuries upon centuries of the same ole same ole.
What’s the answer? Response : Not in our lifetime will we see significant change. IMHO.
 

Yourmaninvegas

I am here to protect and serve
Feb 16, 2016
884
321
63
-
In most cases worldwide squatters are “notified” for years on end until
the judgement day. Have you ever heard, ever, that the people that were squatting illegal moved voluntarily? I never have. Squatters don’t move because they have no place to go.
This I did not know.
But it makes complete sense to me.
Wait until the bulldozers show up.
Fall in front of them.
I hope the news cameras are there.
Hail Mary play.
Thank you for the insight.
 

bob saunders

Platinum
Jan 1, 2002
28,547
2,120
113
dr1.com
That is the problem with capitalism at it's core.
The bottom line is everything.
My problem is not the eviction.
My question is about how was it handled.
Was prior notice given❓
If people defrauded others are they being pursued legally❓ (and not some weak *** get an attorney and file suit)
All this has happened before and all this will happen again if the law is not enforced in such a way as to keep this from happening in the first place.
Capitalism is NOT a zero sum game ‼️
This eviction has not too much to do with capitalism. This this protected wetlands with no private ownership. Explain how you think Capitalism is too blame. Selling something you don't own is not capitalism, it is fraud. Grifting isn't capitalism.
 

Yourmaninvegas

I am here to protect and serve
Feb 16, 2016
884
321
63
-
This eviction has not too much to do with capitalism. This this protected wetlands with no private ownership. Explain how you think Capitalism is too blame. Selling something you don't own is not capitalism, it is fraud. Grifting isn't capitalism.
You are educator Bob
So, I guess your need to educate is simply second nature for you my man.
I need to ask you if you actually read the article.
"With the support of past local governments, the invaders had been filling in the wetlands and selling lots in Puerto Plata province."
If something was sold then it was indeed Capitalism.
Was it all cash in paper bags and suitcases ❓
If not then it was the institutions of capitalism that allowed the financial transactions to occur.
At what point did the "Government" realize this was occurring❓
Did someone suddenly get WOKE and realize that the wetlands were being filled to the tune of 200+ residences and buildings ❓
If it is indeed fraud then someone needs to answer for it.
I state again:
"With the support of past local governments, the invaders had been filling in the wetlands and selling lots in Puerto Plata province."
It is a capitalistic mindset that puts the bottom line, making money above all else that allows individuals to think and act in this manner.

Now since you have so many questions of me...I have one for you:
Who is to blame when one government sells you something and another government says you were not able to buy it when you are living in the same country and were not invaded with a completely new government put in place❓
:unsure:
 

Auryn

Well-known member
Apr 22, 2012
787
347
83
When I volunteered there, a tropical storm hit and half the families in La Ciénaga lost their houses, or tried to stay dry sitting up on the one bed they might have owned. The little girls came to school after school reopened in a clean dress and their hair all done. Their house was either gone or had 3 ft of water in it but their parents still cared for them.
These people are resilient but they still need help.

This issue isn’t cut and dry. It’s easy to look at it that way from the comfort of your air conditioned condo. Of course they can’t stay, but there’s complexities to these situations and kids are involved for crying out loud. Lots of these people aren’t intentionally squatting, and some of them were duped into thinking they purchased their land legally.

In all honesty, I have to remind myself that DR1 members have made some big contributions to help out lately. As so many threads seem to descend into the abyss lately, I need that reminder. Such a great show of support for Strength for the Journey at Christmas and the travelhippo story for example, all very recently.

That said, who be a good contact on the North Coast with connections in La Ciénaga?
 
  • Like
Reactions: NanSanPedro

windeguy

Platinum
Jul 10, 2004
34,482
1,907
113
When I volunteered there, a tropical storm hit and half the families in La Ciénaga lost their houses, or tried to stay dry sitting up on the one bed they might have owned. The little girls came to school after school reopened in a clean dress and their hair all done. Their house was either gone or had 3 ft of water in it but their parents still cared for them.
These people are resilient but they still need help.

This issue isn’t cut and dry. It’s easy to look at it that way from the comfort of your air conditioned condo. Of course they can’t stay, but there’s complexities to these situations and kids are involved for crying out loud. Lots of these people aren’t intentionally squatting, and some of them were duped into thinking they purchased their land legally.

In all honesty, I have to remind myself that DR1 members have made some big contributions to help out lately. As so many threads seem to descend into the abyss lately, I need that reminder. Such a great show of support for Strength for the Journey at Christmas and the travelhippo story for example, all very recently.

That said, who be a good contact on the North Coast with connections in La Ciénaga?
Freddy, the Mayor of Cabarete, would be a good starting point.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Auryn