Taino History

Aguaita29

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Jul 27, 2011
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If you understand Spanish, you should check out the YT channel Kiskeya Life. They have done multiple videos on Tainos and MANY other DR related topics. They made a video 4 months ago about how the Tainos language sounded and that there are people trying to "revive" the Taino language.
If you do understand spanish you will LOVE this channel... HOURS worth of DR history!
Kiskeya Life: https://www.youtube.com/c/KiskeyaLifeTV/videos

Regarding DNA my Ancestry results gave me a 12% Taino DNA and im from the Cibao ( La Vega ).
Love Kiskeya Life. They make videos in English too.
 

keepcoming

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May 25, 2011
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NALS knowledge on this subject is to be respected. I do hope he writes a book or publish information about this.
 
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Auryn

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Apr 22, 2012
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I likely can find a lot on the Taino online or in existing books, as shared.

What I find interesting is the specifically Dominican angle regarding their history. Not all of that information is readily available, at least not without extensive research. I have 2 history minors but not enough time to do that justice at present.
 

Auryn

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Apr 22, 2012
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This 2019 National Geographic article looks interesting, but it’s locked behind a paywall.

What is allowed to be seen for free states that the Taino were only wiped off the historical record in writing, and that they went into the mountains to hide.

NALs mention of the European ancestry on the Paternal Y DNA would be a given, considering that in any incidence of colonization that is how the ancestry pattern comes out in the wash.

Meet the survivors of a ‘paper genocide’
 

Auryn

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Apr 22, 2012
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Here is another interesting article.

Taino: Indigenous Caribbeans

How common is it for modern day Dominicans (not living in the US) to identify as Taino, as this excerpt states?

Modern Taino Heritage

Groups of people currently identify as Taíno, most notably among the Puerto Ricans and Dominicans, both on the islands and on United States mainland. The concept of the “living Taíno” has been proven in a census in 2002. Some scholars, such as Jalil Sued Badillo, an ethnohistorian at the University of Puerto Rico, assert that the official Spanish historical record speak of the disappearance of the Taínos, but survivors had descendants and intermarried with other ethnic groups. Recent research notes a high percentage of mixed or tri-racial ancestry among people in Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic, with those claiming Taíno ancestry also having Spanish and African ancestry.


Goliath’s 12% is a lot, genetically speaking. Many on my husband’s mother’s side has a distinctive eye shape that her family attributes to Taino ancestry. They definitely don’t identify as Taino though.
 
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Auryn

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Apr 22, 2012
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Came across this research article recently:

Origins and Genetic Legacies of the Caribbean Taino

For those interested in genetics, I thought the article as a whole provides interesting information. An excerpt states:

Modern DNA studies (5, 6) also point to South America, but they are complicated by the fact that modern Caribbean genomes are largely composed of African and European ancestry and that only relatively little indigenous Caribbean ancestry remains (57). Furthermore, it is unclear whether this native component reflects Taino ancestry or whether it reached the Caribbean as a result of later population movements and migrations. The key to solving these issues lies in ancient DNA, but so far ancient DNA studies in the Caribbean have been hampered by poor preservation (8), and the few studies that exist are limited to mitochondrial DNA and, therefore, lack in resolution (911).
 
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william webster

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I came across this elsewhere and thought it might fit here -
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Cuevas de Pomier.

Located in the foothills of the Cordillera Central north of San Crisobal is the Anthropological Reserve of Cuevas del Pomier which houses many paintings of historic signficance. They are also accessed through a working quarry for coralina stone and that causes some alarm for historians.

Yesterday the President by decree a commission to research this prehistoric site of significance:

Abinader appoints commission to convert Cuevas del Pomier into the prehistoric capital of the country

https://listindiario.com/la-republica/2 … a-del-pais

https://images2.listindiario.com/n/content/695/695307/p/680x460/202111032106391.jpeg


The President of the Republic, Luis Abinader, created a technical-scientific commission to direct the research work that supports the recognition of the Cuevas de Borbón or Pomier Anthropological Reserve, located in San Cristóbal, as the prehistoric capital of the Dominican Republic.

Through Decree 705-21, issued this Monday, the prime minister appointed several ministers to carry out these inquiries, which will be headed by the Minister of the Environment and Natural Resources, together with the Minister of Tourism and the Minister of Culture.

The commission was created in order to value the fauna and flora that the aborigines used as their food, as well as the extinct species whose remains have been located in the area of the Caves of Borbón or Pomier.

This reserve has petroglyphs and pictographs that should be valued, in addition to the investigation of their connection with other Mesoamerican cultures.

Phil Lehman, from the DRSS Foundation (Dominican Republic Speleological Society); Manuel García Arévalo, from the García Arévalo Foundation; Clenis Tavarez María, anthropologist at the Museum of the Dominican Man and Juan Almonte, paleontologist at the Museum of Natural History.

The Caves of Borbón or del Pomier, located in the Borbón section of the San Cristóbal province, have more than 6,000 prehistoric paintings and approximately 500 cave engravings.

In addition to having tourist potential, the Cuevas de Borbón or del Pomier Anthropological Reserve constitutes an archaeological and anthropological heritage, which is why they are of great interest for the study of the Amerindian groups that inhabited the Caribbean islands.

Tours can be found starting in nearby Santo Domingo for those interested in visiting such sites.