The attainability of education in DR

deelt

Bronze
Mar 23, 2004
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Truly happy for Keira, just wondering if these scholarships are reachable to lower income folks. Just wondering why there cannot be more Keiras or the Keira's whose parents couldn't afford college at all.
Deelt
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A youngster's dreams come true
Diario Libre reports on Keira Elizabeth Susana, who was able to see both of her dreams come true in just one day: to study at PUCMM and meeting the First Lady in person. On 24 August 2005, 13-year-old Keira - the country's youngest high school graduate - will become the youngest university student in the DR, after receiving a full scholarship from PUCMM. And yesterday, First Lady Margarita Cedeno de Fernandez received the young girl in her offices. After reading the story in yesterday's Diario Libre, the chancellor of PUCMM, Msgr. Agripino Nunez Collado, sent for Keira and her parents, Susana Sosa and Nelson Susana, to inform them that the university was awarding her a full scholarship. The university also assigned her a tutor, Dr. Amparo Fernandez, the academy's registrar, who will look after the teenager during her time at school. The good news led Keira to change her study course from information technology to architecture, which she had given up due to the lack of economic resources. Keira thanked Diario Libre for publishing her dreams and Msgr. Nunez Collado for making them come true.
 

bienamor

Kansas redneck an proud of it
Apr 23, 2004
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Think you really need to take this into account

deelt said:
Truly happy for Keira, just wondering if these scholarships are reachable to lower income folks. Just wondering why there cannot be more Keiras or the Keira's whose parents couldn't afford college at all.
Deelt
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A youngster's dreams come true
Diario Libre reports on Keira Elizabeth Susana, who was able to see both of her dreams come true in just one day: to study at PUCMM and meeting the First Lady in person. On 24 August 2005, 13-year-old Keira - the country's youngest high school graduate - will become the youngest university student in the DR, after receiving a full scholarship from PUCMM. And yesterday, First Lady Margarita Cedeno de Fernandez received the young girl in her offices. After reading the story in yesterday's Diario Libre, the chancellor of PUCMM, Msgr. Agripino Nunez Collado, sent for Keira and her parents, Susana Sosa and Nelson Susana, to inform them that the university was awarding her a full scholarship. The university also assigned her a tutor, Dr. Amparo Fernandez, the academy's registrar, who will look after the teenager during her time at school. The good news led Keira to change her study course from information technology to architecture, which she had given up due to the lack of economic resources. Keira thanked Diario Libre for publishing her dreams and Msgr. Nunez Collado for making them come true.



On 24 August 2005, 13-year-old Keira - the country's youngest high school graduate - will become the youngest university student in the DR, after receiving a full scholarship from PUCMM.

Where did she graduate from?
 

deelt

Bronze
Mar 23, 2004
987
2
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So is that what it takes? BTW, I did take it into consideration. Or now to top off Keira do you need to be a one-eyed, one-leg genius done with HS at the age of 10? Needless to say that I personally question the level of education of her parents and if she was home schooled at all.

bienamor said:
On 24 August 2005, 13-year-old Keira - the country's youngest high school graduate - will become the youngest university student in the DR, after receiving a full scholarship from PUCMM.

Where did she graduate from?
 

bob saunders

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Jan 1, 2002
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Maybe I'm thick,in your statement"so that's what it takes" what are you refering to. Nowhere did it say she was from a family with money and why do you question the quality of her education or her parents education.
 

bienamor

Kansas redneck an proud of it
Apr 23, 2004
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So Whats your point?

deelt said:
So is that what it takes? BTW, I did take it into consideration. Or now to top off Keira do you need to be a one-eyed, one-leg genius done with HS at the age of 10? Needless to say that I personally question the level of education of her parents and if she was home schooled at all.


Any country gives a high priority to a person accomplishing something normally considered above their age level such as graduating high school at 13. This type of thing does not happen that often and is normally always awarded a full ride scholarship no matter the socioeconomic level of the parents!

I am not questioning the girls or her parents educational level its not my place that would have been PUCMM's. In order to ensure that she and they are not embarrassed at a later date.

Now if you were talking normal scholarship opportunities you would have a whole different argument. But this one does not qualify as normal.
 

deelt

Bronze
Mar 23, 2004
987
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What I read between the lines of this remarkable story is that the parents have money but not that much. They parents I am also assuming have some significant level of education to care enough to push their daughter beyond the mediocre.

Yet, my question is with regards to needs of a country. Are the needs of the country being met? No, I'm not trying to revoke this girls scholarship. But I am trying to get people to think about something beyond piece-meal service. If being a 13 year old girl wonder is what it takes to get a full ride to a prestigious university in DR, then as in many Latin American country's it will be a one-up competition.
 

bienamor

Kansas redneck an proud of it
Apr 23, 2004
5,004
426
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Your making your own lines to read between.

deelt said:
What I read between the lines of this remarkable story is that the parents have money but not that much. They parents I am also assuming have some significant level of education to care enough to push their daughter beyond the mediocre.

Yet, my question is with regards to needs of a country. Are the needs of the country being met? No, I'm not trying to revoke this girls scholarship. But I am trying to get people to think about something beyond piece-meal service. If being a 13 year old girl wonder is what it takes to get a full ride to a prestigious university in DR, then as in many Latin American country's it will be a one-up competition.

Nothing said in the paper about her school, parents, or grades. Probably private, yes parents educated, and high grade level. Nothing new here would be the same in other Countries. Has nothing to do with the DR. :eek: :

How many full ride scholastic scholarships do you know of in the US(at any level of college?) Very few in comparison to Athletics. I know valedictorians that got $500us, for the first year only. Thats a long way away from a full ride. :rambo:

As you said a 13 year old wonder, that graduated and won a full ride. Great I am glad for her, she deserves it! In any country! :tired:
 

deelt

Bronze
Mar 23, 2004
987
2
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Actually, I make it my business to know and their are a multitude of scholarships...you just have to look and apply, if you in fact qualify. I paid only $8K on an education that otherwise would have cost me over $250K.
And I can't even throw a ball.

On the rest I'll just let it go.
D

bienamor said:
Nothing said in the paper about her school, parents, or grades. Probably private, yes parents educated, and high grade level. Nothing new here would be the same in other Countries. Has nothing to do with the DR. :eek: :

How many full ride scholastic scholarships do you know of in the US(at any level of college?) Very few in comparison to Athletics. I know valedictorians that got $500us, for the first year only. Thats a long way away from a full ride. :rambo:

As you said a 13 year old wonder, that graduated and won a full ride. Great I am glad for her, she deserves it! In any country! :tired:
 

bienamor

Kansas redneck an proud of it
Apr 23, 2004
5,004
426
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ok

deelt said:
Actually, I make it my business to know and their are a multitude of scholarships...you just have to look and apply, if you in fact qualify. I paid only $8K on an education that otherwise would have cost me over $250K.
And I can't even throw a ball.

On the rest I'll just let it go.
D

Congratulations.

Other than you how many people do you know that have qualified, this is the same question you asked about down here.

Your correct in the US there are a multitude of scholarships, but most of them do not provide a full ride. You need to find everything you can qualify for and normally have multiple scholarships.

Was a story a few years ago about a girl in Tampa that had qualified for something like 30 of them and yes did wind up with a full ride. and more than a few of them were ethnic based, which could rule out a lot of applicants.

Are these scholarships from a premier dominican college avaliable to the general population. Answer probably not, just like anywhere else.
 

deelt

Bronze
Mar 23, 2004
987
2
0
I know plenty of people that have gotten their educations partially paid for.
The point is to look, find and apply. Most people don't. Many scholarships are need-based. The point should not be to get a "full ride" rather to met the need. That's like JLG says, "buscando el mango bajito." Hey sometimes you even have to work to get the discount. I'm not against working.

I really don't think you are getting where I am coming from. For the most part I was being a comic. You cite exceptions and are not seeing the irony in the story.

bienamor said:
Other than you how many people do you know that have qualified, this is the same question you asked about down here.

Your correct in the US there are a multitude of scholarships, but most of them do not provide a full ride. You need to find everything you can qualify for and normally have multiple scholarships.

Was a story a few years ago about a girl in Tampa that had qualified for something like 30 of them and yes did wind up with a full ride. and more than a few of them were ethnic based, which could rule out a lot of applicants.

Are these scholarships from a premier dominican college avaliable to the general population. Answer probably not, just like anywhere else.