The Cibao old families & Geneology

kapitan75

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Jun 3, 2005
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Love reading through the post. I would love to start my own search, but have found it to be very difficult. I looked through your link chellow, with some hope of finding a link, but no luck.
I did have a distant cousin do a big search and he was able to find a link to spain. He was looking for that pot of gold somewhere, but i am unable to sit with him.
Is there a baitoa or sabana iglesia records online for viewing? Would love to search some records. Its hard when my great gramps was called by a nickname, and juan is a very common first name. Checho , manilla, fulandito, a big mix of nicknames or second and third names.
 
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AlterEgo

Administrator
Staff member
Jan 9, 2009
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South Coast
Love reading through the post. I would love to start my own search, but have found it to be very difficult. I looked through your link chellow, with some hope of finding a link, but no luck.
I did have a distant cousin do a big search and he was able to find a link to spain. He was looking for that pot of gold somewhere, but i am unable to sit with him.
Is there a baitoa or sabana iglesia records online for viewing? Would love to search some records. Its hard when my great gramps was called by a nickname, and juan is a very common first name. Checho , manilla, fulandito, a big mix of nicknames or second and third names.

kapitan, you can start here: https://familysearch.org/search/collection/location/1927011

Yes, the nicknames make it a challenge, I've had the same problem with my husband's Cibao family.
 

Chellow

Member
Jul 27, 2006
107
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Chellow, not sure if I asked this before, but in looking at your website I'm wondering if any of your Gonzalez Martinez or Martinez lived in Santo Domingo?

The (Gonzalez Martinez) that I have is from la Reyna in licey and maybe some of the Martinez may have moved to Santo Domingo I don?t know.
 

Chellow

Member
Jul 27, 2006
107
5
18
Love reading through the post. I would love to start my own search, but have found it to be very difficult. I looked through your link chellow, with some hope of finding a link, but no luck.
I did have a distant cousin do a big search and he was able to find a link to spain. He was looking for that pot of gold somewhere, but i am unable to sit with him.
Is there a baitoa or sabana iglesia records online for viewing? Would love to search some records. Its hard when my great gramps was called by a nickname, and juan is a very common first name. Checho , manilla, fulandito, a big mix of nicknames or second and third names.

I?ll like to help you, PM me with any info that you may have, for example if your grandparents have passed away in DR, their names, (city) town and province they may have died in and year of their deaths.
 

NALs

Polls Forum Moderator
Jan 20, 2003
9,753
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Muchas gracias, Cherllow.

Me ha sido ?til para unas investigaciones que ten?a en proceso desde hace varios meses.

Saludos
 

Gurabo444

New member
Nov 1, 2009
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I was a bit hesitant to share the following, but I need to be fair and share the interesting facts and also dark facts about my ancestors. This weekend I found out that my Dominguez family along with many of the other traditional families in Gurabo were Slave Owners. They had a considerable amount of them, but I have no more details about it.

I always pictured my ancestors as being poor farmers who couldn't even afford a slave. Now I would really like to find more details about why they had them etc. but I'm afraid likely never will due to the lack of documents.
 

NALs

Polls Forum Moderator
Jan 20, 2003
9,753
630
113
I was a bit hesitant to share the following, but I need to be fair and share the interesting facts and also dark facts about my ancestors. This weekend I found out that my Dominguez family along with many of the other traditional families in Gurabo were Slave Owners. They had a considerable amount of them, but I have no more details about it.

I always pictured my ancestors as being poor farmers who couldn't even afford a slave. Now I would really like to find more details about why they had them etc. but I'm afraid likely never will due to the lack of documents.
There is nothing to feel shame for. Those were different times and we must not judge the distant past by modern social norms. With that said, the Spaniards tended to be rather mild not just in the slave laws but also in practice. Dominican Spaniards had the extra 'advantage' of being mostly poor, because even the richest families lived with limitations especially after the 17th century. For a long time masses were held before dawn in order for the upper class women to be able to attend mass and not display to others the ragged clothing they were able to wear, of times in such dyre circumstances that many were effectively partially naked. The darkness of the night made it easier to hide the poverty that afflicted even the most important families and they spend the day within closed doors.

While most Spaniards that settled what is now the DR never owned slaves and most of the few that did gave them a treatment so mild that in the 1790's French Moreau de Saint Mery described it as 'companions more than actual slaves' (he didn't said the same about his own countrymen on the French side), just cross your fingers that none of the ones in your lineage were part of the minority that was out of the norm and mistreated their slaves.

As for finding information, its actually slightly easier in former Spanish colonies to trace those lineages. Perhaps you are not aware that the slaves had to be baptized. Because of that, the slaves baptism books are still available, especially the one's from the 1700's.

You might want to read this if you haven't already:

El trato a los esclavos en el Santo Domingo espa?ol
 

Chellow

Member
Jul 27, 2006
107
5
18
After 20 years of building my tree that contains 3449 relatives, below you will find my notable ancestors and DNA data.



Ethnicity Estimate​


  • Portugal 27%

  • Spain 24%

  • Cameroon, Congo & Western Bantu Peoples 10%

  • Senegal 7%

  • Northern Africa 5%

  • Benin & Togo 5%

  • Indigenous Haiti & Dominican Republic 3%

  • Scotland 3%

  • Nigeria 3%

  • Wales 2%

  • European Jewish 2%

  • Indigenous Eastern South America 2%

  • England & Northwestern Europe 1%

  • Middle East 1%

  • Basque 1%

  • Ireland 1%

  • Indigenous Americas—Colombia & Venezuela 1%

  • Sweden 1%

  • Indigenous Americas—Yucatan Peninsula <1%

Dominican Republic 100%




Notable Ancestors:

Great grand children of Francisco Antonio Cabrera and Rosa Lopez

Raul Cabrera Rodriguez :

General and Minister of War and Navy of the cabinet of President Carlos Morales Languasco. Killed in the revolutionary campaign of 1904 and buried on May 27 of that year. Brigadier General Santos García, civil and military governor, declared the day of mourning to be his burial.

Eliseo Cabrera Rodriguez :
General and Minister of War and Navy of the cabinet of President Carlos Morales Languasco. Was victim of guerrilla action of Jimenismo in the
east of the country during the month of January 1904

Rafael Alfonso Adolfo Estevez Cabrera
Hugo Adolfo Estevez Cabrera
Gustavo Adolfo Rafael Estevez Cabrera
Bolívar Candelario Cabrera


The above descendants were arrested for being part of a plot to assassinate Trujillo in the summer of 1956, soon almost all of the Cabrera's that lived in the town of Canca near Moca were also arrested. Rafael, Hugo, Gustavo, Bolívar died in the hands of Trujillo.

Andrés José Moreta married to Angela Mercedes Cabrera

Diplomat and pilot. As a pilot in the Dominican Air Force. Was the first Dominican pilot to break the sound barrier.


Great grand nieces of Bernardo Fernandez and Eufemia Abreu

Aida Patria Mirabal Reyes
Bélgica Adela Mirabal Reyes
Antonia María Teresa Mirabal Reyes
María Argentina Mirabal Reyes


martyred Sisters on a 200 peso note
Trulli


The Mirabal sisters known commonly as Patria, Minerva, María Teresa, and Dedé, who opposed the dictatorship of Rafael Trujillo and were involved in clandestine activities against his regime. Three of the four sisters (Patria, Minerva, María Teresa) were assassinated on 25 November 1960. The last sister, Dedé, died of natural causes on 1 February 2014.

The assassinations turned the Mirabal sisters into "symbols of both popular and feminist resistance". In 1999, in the sisters' honor, the United Nations General Assembly designated 25 November the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women.
wiki of the Mirabal sisters

Great Aunt Maria Francisca Jorge wife of Pascual Antonio Alba:

At first the town of Licey al Medio was known by the name of Cruz de María Francisca, as Maria Francisca Jorge was the first healer. The name of Cruz was due to the fact where Doña Francisca lived, on the road that connected the towns of Las Palomas and La Reina. Their is a monument currently in the town in honor of Maria Francisca Jorge.