The local economy

May 29, 2006
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The local economy in a nutshell. Any other ubiquitous local businesses come to mind?


All but the poorest barrios:
Colmados
Salons/Barber shops
Paca/Variadades
Bancas
Street Vendors
Cyber/Nintendo
Pica longa and other fast food stands

Calle Principales:
Gomeros/Repair Shops
Carnecerias/Polleros
Fruit/Veg Stands
Panaderias
Moto Prestamos
Ferreterias
Billiar/Sport Bars/Small Discos(Car Wash)
Dental Clinics/ Medico
Cafeterias with seating
Muebles usados
Gyms
Cell phone accessories

Downtown sectors:
Abogados
Real Estate
Fashion and Sport stores
Bancos
Chain and Box stores
Chinese Import Stores
Cell phone/Cable offices
Car dealerships/Prestamos
Restaurants
Hotels/Casinos
Large Discos
High end muebles
Supermarkets
Movie theaters
Wholesalers
 

CristoRey

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Apr 1, 2014
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Any other ubiquitous local businesses come to mind?
Here in Santiago I?d have to include all of the Haitians offering the same goods as some of the larger tiendas.. often at a better price.
I guess they would be considered ?street vendors?
 
Sep 4, 2012
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Forgot the street vendors and the buscones. Haitians selling everything in la capital is on its own an underground economy.
 

bob saunders

Platinum
Jan 1, 2002
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dr1.com
farmacies, eye-glasses, agricultural supplies, pet-stores, copy shops, liberias, flower shops, nurseries, iron-works, credit unions, banks, ice-cream parlors, ....etc.
 
May 29, 2006
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Weird how the farm stores are in town. I'd love to find something like an AGWAY. I couldn't figure out what the big *rocks* were so I asked... Salt blocks.

We picked up some more chinola vines the other day. 20 pesos in six inch bags.
 
May 29, 2006
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The per capita number of small businesses is completely different. A list of what the DR doesn't have would still be a lot longer than the first post.
 

Mauricio

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Nov 18, 2002
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The particularity of the Dominican local economy is not si much what they have or lack but that 35-40% of the economy is government spending. Government spent the budget, economy comes to a standstill. That's why for example in an election year , where the government spends their budget almost completely in 6 months the rest of the year is crap, business wise.*
 

Mauricio

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Nov 18, 2002
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Can you give me an example of what businesses the DR doesn't have, besides laundromats and campgrounds.


Personally I couldn't easily point out a list of missing businesses, it's more the quality of the business that's lacking. For example a glasses store, there are several, not to say plenty. However they give bad service and/or the clerks have no idea how to assist you in buying a pair of (sun)glasses. You go to a glasses store in a developed country and they really help you , what kind of glasses would fit with your face, skin color, personality.*

Another business what in some form is around here but nothing like what I would like to find is a delicatessen store, like this:

 

dulce

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Jan 1, 2002
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Although some may think so Santo Domingo is not the whole country. Laundromats are rare. Dry Cleaners , there are plenty.

I must have got lucky. There was a Laundromat 2 doors down from my apartment in SD and also one within walking distance from my apartment in Juan Dolio. Both of them had the option to do your own laundry or have it done for you. I am sure there are more of the same around the country.
 
May 29, 2006
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The DR has similar businesses to the US yes, but a Dominican pizza place is nothing like a NYC shop.

One thing I like about the DR is how many ppl own their own business and that they don't have to compete with Big Box Stores and that so many run businesses out of their homes.

Haven't seen a laundramat yet in Hig?ey, but plenty of drop off places. I can't even count how many Mueble stores there are.
 
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May 29, 2006
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I've yet to see a barrio too poor for a colmado. Too small, maybe.
Often the poorer neighborhoods here have more colmados, but none are stocked so you need to go to six places to get four items. We just had another open fifty yards from the biggest one and my guess is they're depending on sales when the big one is busiest. I shop at up to five colmados in one day, all within two blocks of our apt. The best stocked can have a 20 minute wait during the late morning rush. The closest is often out of change for 100 pesos.