The top 10 cities where the best Spanish is spoken

Marianopolita

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Puerto Rico also butchers the language. I think it goes to laziness. Not taking the time to say it out and taking shortcuts.
Chaco dame do ma cerveza pa mi miga

I have to resist commenting on this…. I will wait for Lucifer.

What a huge generalization- you said ‘Puerto Rico also butchers the language’.
So there is no Puerto Rican that speaks well?

These types of comments are so misleading. What’s your knowledge of Caribbean Spanish and the history of it from a linguistic point of view? Please share.
 

chico bill

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I have to resist commenting on this…. I will wait for Lucifer.

What a huge generalization- you said ‘Puerto Rico also butchers the language’.
So there is no Puerto Rican that speaks well?

These types of comments are so misleading. What’s your knowledge of Caribbean Spanish and the history of it from a linguistic point of view? Please share.
Of course there are just as there are some Dominicans that speak well. Those with college educations and professional careers. But they also speak English for the most part. But after being in Colombia, Mexico, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Panama, Honduras, and living 10 years in PR, 1 year in Costa Rica and being in DR since 2014 I can say Colombia is good, Mexico and Guatemala also - the rest no very good pronunciation
 
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Marianopolita

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Of course there are just as there are some Dominicans that speak well. Those with college educations and professional careers. But they also speak English for the most part. But after being in Colombia, Mexico, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Panama, Honduras, and living 10 years in PR, 1 year in Costa Rica and being in DR since 2014 I can say Colombia is good, Mexico and Guatemala also - the rest no very good pronunciation

Well, I am glad you clarified that. A blanket statement is dangerous. I understood what you were trying to say but other people reading this may not. Therefore, it is good to expand.

Puerto Rico unfortunately gets harsh critique about the characteristics of its spoken language. While it is part of Caribbean Spanish and shares many linguistic aspects with DR and Cuba there are also many speech patterns that are unique to PR such as archaisms, wrong verb conjugations, and sometimes it is just difficult to understand what is being said. Even the R to L change which is heard in all three islands is heard the most in PR to the point where I am shocked when I don’t hear it. Other than education I am still researching why some say amol, hablal, puelta etc and some don’t. All are very interesting linguistic details and observations.
 

Marianopolita

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PR (slang) words:

acho and chacho- are short forms of muchacho.

¿Qué tal chacho?
Wepa….
Janguear….this word I think came from New York not from the island
Al garete
El Corillo


I am learning.
 

cavok

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Cabarete
Puerto Rico also butchers the language. I think it goes to laziness. Not taking the time to say it out and taking shortcuts.
Chaco dame do ma cerveza pa mi miga
Although educated speakers are easier to understand, I remember being in a bar in the Isla Verde section with a Peruvian friend of mine when two Puerto Ricans got into a somewhat heated exchange. When it was I over, I asked him what it was about. He looked at me and said - "I don't know(?). I hardly understood a word they said"
Puerto Rico also butchers the language. I think it goes to laziness. Not taking the time to say it out and taking shortcuts.
Chaco dame do ma cerveza pa mi miga
Although educated speakers are easier to understand, I remember being in a bar in the Isla Verde section with a Peruvian friend when two Puerto Ricans got into a somewhat heated exchange. When it was over, I asked him what was it about. He looked at me and said: "I don't know(?). I hardly understood a word they said".
 
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chico bill

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Well, I am glad you clarified that. A blanket statement is dangerous. I understood what you were trying to say but other people reading this may not. Therefore, it is good to expand.

Puerto Rico unfortunately gets harsh critique about the characteristics of its spoken language. While it is part of Caribbean Spanish and shares many linguistic aspects with DR and Cuba there are also many speech patterns that are unique to PR such as archaisms, wrong verb conjugations, and sometimes it is just difficult to understand what is being said. Even the R to L change which is heard in all three islands is heard the most in PR to the point where I am shocked when I don’t hear it. Other than education I am still researching why some say amol, hablal, puelta etc and some don’t. All are very interesting linguistic details and observations.
Oh and Costa Rica is almost on par with Colombia
 
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Marianopolita

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Oh and Costa Rica is almost on par with Colombia

Agreed. Although I have never been there from what I heard it is a peaceful and progressive Latin American country or at least heading in the right direction. Que viva Costa Rica. Pura vida 🇨🇷


Let’s see how much you remember. Without looking on the web what is the word used in Costa Rica to say coffee?
 

cavok

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Cabarete
I give up. What? Off hand, I don't remember another word other than cafe being used, and I've been there dozens of times.
 

chico bill

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Agreed. Although I have never been there from what I heard it is a peaceful and progressive Latin American country or at least heading in the right direction. Que viva Costa Rica. Pura vida 🇨🇷


Let’s see how much you remember. Without looking on the web what is the word used in Costa Rica to say coffee?
most of the time it was Nescafe, yes even in the nice restaurants they served instant coffee in the land full of coffee plantation
 

Big

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Puerto Rico also butchers the language. I think it goes to laziness. Not taking the time to say it out and taking shortcuts.
Chaco dame do ma cerveza pa mi miga
Dominican Spanish is Rap Music, Spain Spanish is Opera
 

Lucifer

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Carlos Fuentes should be on everybody's list, too. He's probably the most popular Mexican author of the twentieth-century.

I know Jaime Bayly has a TV show out of Miami, but I wasn't aware of his writing prowess. I will most definitely look him up this weekend.

Thank you.
 
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Marianopolita

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@Lucifer

You will like Jaime Bayly. He writes about various political topics as well as short stories. He critiques the Peruvian upper class which I believe he is a part of (his family) I have read most of his novels except a few simply because of time constraints but I am going get back to his books. His Spanish is top notch.

Books I have read and recommend:

No se lo digas a nadie
Fue ayer y no me acuerdo
Y de repente un ángel
El huracán lleva su nombre


If you can’t find his column on the weekend let me know and I will see where he is posting now and provide the link.
 
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Lucifer

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I have to resist commenting on this…. I will wait for Lucifer.

What a huge generalization- you said ‘Puerto Rico also butchers the language’.
So there is no Puerto Rican that speaks well?

These types of comments are so misleading. What’s your knowledge of Caribbean Spanish and the history of it from a linguistic point of view? Please share.
Yes, that is a huge generalization... INDEED!

When I lived in PR, I didn't pay much attention to the way folks communicated, that is, beyond the obvious differences when compared to my country of origin. I did notice, however, that some folks pronounced the double-Rs, as in 'carro' or initial R, as in 'rodilla' with a certain throaty sound. It was most evident with people from the interior, whom some consider jíbaros, or country folks.
While living in NYC, I started paying attention to PR news, and I was extremely impressed with the way PR politicians communicated.

As an interpreter in the Dallas area, I can say that I've witnessed proper Spanish from all nationalities, yes, including Dominicans, Cubans, and PR folks.
But I've also had to interpret for Mexicans, and Central- and South-Americans whom did not communicate as well as others. So, I'm with you, Marianopolita, and believe that we should not generalize so readily.

I'd venture to say that most of us can shorten a word with full knowledge of the proper way:

Ya 'tamo cansao de e'ta lluvia vs "Ya estamos cansados de esta lluvia".

¿Pande tú va?
vs ¿Para dónde vas?

¿Cómo tú 'tá?
vs ¿Cómo estás?
 

Lucifer

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Jun 26, 2012
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@Lucifer

You will like Jaime Bayly. He writes about various political topics as well as short stories. He critiques the Peruvian upper class which I believe he is a part of (his family) I have read most of his novels except a few simply because of time constraints but I am going get back to his books. His Spanish is top notch.

Books I have read and recommend:

No se lo digas a nadie
Fue ayer y no me acuerdo
Y de repente un ángel
El huracán lleva su nombre


If you can’t find his column on the weekend let me know and I will see where he is posting now and provide the link.
A former co-worker of mine hails from Perú. He studied journalism in Lima. We used to talk about Bayly but only in reference to his political opinions on his show.
I will most definitely search for those books and his essays.

Thank you.
 
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Marianopolita

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Yes, that is a huge generalization... INDEED!

When I lived in PR, I didn't pay much attention to the way folks communicated, that is, beyond the obvious differences when compared to my country of origin. I did notice, however, that some folks pronounced the double-Rs, as in 'carro' or initial R, as in 'rodilla' with a certain throaty sound. It was most evident with people from the interior, whom some consider jíbaros, or country folks.
While living in NYC, I started paying attention to PR news, and I was extremely impressed with the way PR politicians communicated.

As an interpreter in the Dallas area, I can say that I've witnessed proper Spanish from all nationalities, yes, including Dominicans, Cubans, and PR folks.
But I've also had to interpret for Mexicans, and Central- and South-Americans whom did not communicate as well as others. So, I'm with you, Marianopolita, and believe that we should not generalize so readily.

I'd venture to say that most of us can shorten a word with full knowledge of the proper way:

Ya 'tamo cansao de e'ta lluvia vs "Ya estamos cansados de esta lluvia".

¿Pande tú va?
vs ¿Para dónde vas?

¿Cómo tú 'tá?
vs ¿Cómo estás?

I heard about the Puerto Rican double R’s. Apparently, they can’t trill the R which is standard Spanish pronunciation. They say it more like cajo instead of carro with the rolled R. How true it is……no sé. I never noticed that in my interactions with Puerto Ricans (on the island).


It is interesting you mentioned the news because I watch the news daily (at least once per day) and I noticed the PR journalists stand out. I too found the communication was excellent.

Puerto Rico has had this linguistic stigma for a long time to the point of embarrassment and many Puerto Ricans find themselves defending the way they speak even amongst themselves. There is surely more than one variation of Puerto Rican Spanish. However, I will say their urban music hurts them. Other than what we already mentioned I feel this aspect really paints a negative image for Puerto Rico from a linguistic perspective. People that don’t have the knowledge or limited understanding of Spanish beyond ¿hola, cómo estás? will only be negative but I have definitely heard a variety of Spanish from Puerto Rico and just ignore what is not appealing to me.
 
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Lucifer

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I heard about the Puerto Rican double R’s. Apparently, they can’t trill the R which is standard Spanish pronunciation. They say it more like cajo instead of carro with the rolled R. How true it is……no sé. I never noticed that in my interactions with Puerto Ricans (on the island).


It is interesting you mentioned the news because I watch the news daily (at least once per day) and I noticed the PR journalists stand out. I too found the communication was excellent.

Puerto Rico has had this linguistic stigma for a long time to the point of embarrassment and many Puerto Ricans find themselves defending the way they speak even amongst themselves. There is surely more than one variation of Puerto Rican Spanish. However, I will say their urban music hurts them. Other than what we already mentioned I feel this aspect really paints a negative image for Puerto Rico from a linguistic perspective. People that don’t have the knowledge or limited understanding of Spanish beyond ¿hola, cómo estás? will only be negative but I have definitely heard a variety of Spanish from Puerto Rico and just ignore what is not appealing to me.
Yes, the double Rs, as in carro and ferrocarril, and the initial R: rápido, rodilla, Ramón...
But not all PR islanders have those issues.

I'm a big critic of my fellow Dominicans, mainly the communicators and whomever has a voice on national radio and TV.
Some call me pedantic, and they're absolutely correct. I'd much rather give a pass to Joe Public, but not to those with a national audience. Even print media leaves much to be desired.
 

Marianopolita

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Dec 26, 2003
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Yes, the double Rs, as in carro and ferrocarril, and the initial R: rápido, rodilla, Ramón...
But not all PR islanders have those issues.

I'm a big critic of my fellow Dominicans, mainly the communicators and whomever has a voice on national radio and TV.
Some call me pedantic, and they're absolutely correct. I'd much rather give a pass to Joe Public, but not to those with a national audience. Even print media leaves much to be desired.

I think this ties into what we have been talking about regarding language and education. As well, I think even exposure to other Spanish speakers is an issue in the DR. How many Dominicans in the DR have exposure to Spanish outside of the island (not including TV, social media, You Tube etc)? I mean actual contact with other Spanish speakers? This is a factor. In my opinion, the bar for communication is set low.

Journalism is a problem. I thought El Siglo was a good DR paper to read and when it went out of print I moved to my back up Listín Diario and it is the only one I read. The other national ones are not good. Poor syntax for a newspaper and the local town newspapers really hit the language hard. It shows the education level of the journalists.