Top 10 cities where the best Spanish is spoken

Marianopolita

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I just came across this article/ opinion commentary which was written in July 2020 so very recently in which the writer gives her list of the top ten places where the best Spanish is spoken based on key factors such as accent (easy to understand), clarity of the spoken language, pronunciation, pace of speech, usage of colloquialisms, regionalisms etc.


In my opinion, I think the the list is quite accurate at least from the perspective of the Latin cities listed.

An interesting read.





-MP.
 

Chirimoya

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I tend to agree with most of her choices based on my own impressions of the way people speak in these cities and regions. I was also pleasantly surprised to see Andalucia included.
 

Marianopolita

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I tend to agree with most of her choices based on my own impressions of the way people speak in these cities and regions. I was also pleasantly surprised to see Andalucia included.

I think the list is quite accurate and there are no surprises in there in my experience. I expect Colombia to be on there and the same holds true for Peru and Spain. What makes the list even more credible is the fact that the writer gave specific cities because as we know the language varies greatly within the same country. Using Colombia as an example people from the coast do not sound like people from Medellín and people from Medellín do sound like those from Bogotá and so on but even with the many accents all are identifiably Colombian. The Venezuelan accent is very similar to the Colombian and at times indistinguishable. In my experience, I have had to narrow it down to intonation, cadence and vocabulary. However, one thing I have noted, I have never thought a Colombian was a Venezuelan but the other way around yes. I got it now after many years of hearing both accents.

It is interesting how Ecuador passes under the radar but from what I have heard from speakers of the larger cities, Guayaquil and Quito it is absolutely clear (neutral) sounding Spanish but notably South American from the sentence structure, forms of address and politeness in their speech. Many years ago (the job I had at the time) on my lunch break, I would read the dictionary. It was one of those easy to ready ones, good size font, colourful, unilingual Spanish dictionary with great explanations of words and usage. I went to a pasta place on a regular basis for lunch and I had the dictionary on the tray and the lady that served me before she asked me what I would like to order she saw the dictionary saw that it was a Spanish dictionary and right away she said español, qué bien. De hoy en adelante voy a hablarte en español. Soy de Ecuador. From that day on, every time I went I got full service in Spanish and for me it was great to hear her speak because I had not heard much of the Ecuadorian accent prior to that. Bottom line is I was glad to see Guayaquil on the list.

Spanish being the second most spoken language in the world today is so important in my opinion. English is a lingua franca and if you speak Spanish and one of the key European languages such as German or French you are in good shape. I am not sold on the learn Mandarin mantra that started about two decades ago. It is a question of numbers (population) but I think English and Spanish are more worthy to learn but to each his own in terms of choice of one of the top ten languages.


-MP.
 
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Marianopolita

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Andalusian Spanish/ El Andaluz

After watching this video, I think everything sounds normal to me meaning Andalusian Spanish is just another variation of the spoken language and very comprehensible. Many of the features are similar to Caribbean Spanish and one of the roots of Caribbean Spanish is el andaluz. The only aspect which I do not like and is very characteristic of Spanish from Spain is el ceceo. That phonetic pronunciation just isn’t for me other than that I’m ready for Andalucía.




-MP.
 
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Big

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listening to someone from Colombia speak Spanish is like music compared to here. No yelling and/or raising their voice. No slang that I cannot even begin to translate
 
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Marianopolita

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listening to someone from Colombia speak Spanish is like music compared to here. No yelling and/or raising their voice. No slang that I cannot even begin to translate

Yes, there is a huge difference on all levels. Even costeño which is another variation of Caribbean Spanish from the Colombian coast does not fully compare to what you hear in the DR.
 

Caonabo

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listening to someone from Colombia speak Spanish is like music compared to here. No yelling and/or raising their voice. No slang that I cannot even begin to translate

Untrue. It depends on the social/educational/economic levels you associate with.
Colombia has it's share of uncultured types as well.
Each nation does.
 

Big

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Untrue. It depends on the social/educational/economic levels you associate with.
Colombia has it's share of uncultured types as well.
Each nation does.
Wow! and here I thought everyone in Colombia had advanced bio-chem degrees after attending finishing and ettiquette school
 

Big

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May say more about you, than the Dominican. ;)
yes it certainly does. I am a respected businessman that does not communicate or deal in slang or any type of street talk. No tattoos or visible piercings for that matter. They seem to go hand in hand. Ya know what i means bro!!
 

Marianopolita

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So just to make sure this thread stays on topic and does not get personal why don‘t you both Caonabo and Big provide examples in Spanish of typical Colombian Spanish vs typical Dominican Spanish. When I say typical I mean the average speaker from each country.
 

Caonabo

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So just to make sure this thread stays on topic and does not get personal why don‘t you both Caonabo and Big provide examples in Spanish of typical Colombian Spanish vs typical Dominican Spanish. When I say typical I mean the average speaker from each country.

I'll pass, as I truly do not stand a chance up against a "respected businessman".
 

Caonabo

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A cada cual lo suyo.... I don’t want this thread to go the wrong way since there is potential for good discussion.

Back on topic...

In doing so, do you notice the educational/economic levels that the 10 cities mentioned have in common?
Education is the key, and almost always, education is driven by economics.
 

Marianopolita

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In doing so, do you notice the educational/economic levels that the 10 cities mentioned have in common?
Education is the key, and almost always, education is driven by economics.

Absolutely and knowing that I expected certain cities (countries) to be on the list and they are. There are some historial factors as well but in general education is key which is why the list is on point. Leaving my personal experience and opinion aside, I would not have changed much if I were asked to make my own list.
 
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Chirimoya

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Andalucia made the list yet it is the poorest region in Spain with correspondingly low education levels and high illiteracy rates.
 
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Marianopolita

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Andalucia made the list yet it is the poorest region in Spain with correspondingly low education levels and high illiteracy rates.

So once again we see there are exceptions to every rule per se. The idea of education and economics being linked does not mean you will not find areas that do not have these components and good Spanish is spoken by the population. Maybe the good Spanish in Andalucía is influenced by the other regions in Spain where it is heard. I don’t know but it is just a thought. I am glad it is on the list though.
 

cavok

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I can certainly agree with San Jose, Costa Rica. I've spent a lot of time there. I have never been anywhere else where so many people from businessmen to the taxi drivers were so easy to understand. Very clear Spanish to my ears. I've never been to the other cities mentioned.
 
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