Top 10 cities where the best Spanish is spoken

Marianopolita

Moderator Spanish Forum
Dec 26, 2003
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You can find some interesting info on the web that is for sure if you know how to search. Here is one perspective all mapped showing the countries where it is most difficult to learn Spanish as a contrast to my original post and the thread discussion. This is a website offering Spanish lessons by native speakers and other languages. The map does not have Spain maybe because the focus is on Latin America since the website and lessons are from Spain. I don’t know.

Look at the countries in blue. It is very consistent with some of the top 10 in my first post.



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Feb 7, 2007
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Andalusian Spanish/ El Andaluz

After watching this video, I think everything sounds normal to me meaning Andalusian Spanish is just another variation of the spoken language and very comprehensible. Many of the features are similar to Caribbean Spanish and one of the roots of Caribbean Spanish is el andaluz. The only aspect which I do not like and is very characteristic of Spanish from Spain is el ceceo. That phonetic pronunciation just isn’t for me other than that I’m ready for Andalucía.




-MP.

This is like hearing a Dominican with a Spanish de España accent.... Everything listed in this video is like listening to a Dominican.
 
Feb 7, 2007
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This is like hearing a Dominican with a Spanish de España accent.... Everything listed in this video is like listening to a Dominican.

Which poses a question, if Andalucia is one fo the regions with best Spanish (which sound slike Dominican Spanish with Español de España accent) why didnñt the DR make the list _ :sneaky:
 

Marianopolita

Moderator Spanish Forum
Dec 26, 2003
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Which poses a question, if Andalucia is one fo the regions with best Spanish (which sound slike Dominican Spanish with Español de España accent) why didnñt the DR make the list _ :sneaky:
You can’t be serious. This link is only one perspective although I think research was done which is why it is credible.

As well, I think there are similarities to the Dominican accent but an exact match no way. The Spanish spoken in the DR has evolved into it is own version and has other strong influences. Do really think that the average Dominican speaker sounds Andalusian? Really? There is a lot of linguistic material on this and even without it you just need to listen to a handful of speakers from each country and the answer is there.
 

Marianopolita

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You mean like when they say Capitai for Capitol? :LOL:
You mean capital.

But cibaeño is a dialect in the true sense. Therefore, capitai,hablai, bebei.....are all examples of characteristics of this regional form of speech.
 

NanSanPedro

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Apr 12, 2019
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So this guy doesn't think much of DR Spanish? or Cuban? or Argentinian? or Chilean?
 

Marianopolita

Moderator Spanish Forum
Dec 26, 2003
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So this guy doesn't think much of DR Spanish? or Cuban? or Argentinian? or Chilean?

The website most likely used linguistic research and it is not necessarily the opinion of the actual instructor. That information is accessible to him.

No surprises on the map but there are many that can be used to compare.
 

arturo

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Mar 14, 2002
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listening to someone from Colombia speak Spanish is like music compared to here. No yelling and/or raising their voice. No slang that I cannot even begin to translate
Hijepucha, esa nena es mi traga; ella me tiene loco de tusa! - but I agree with the yelling thing.

I find it most annoying when, while I'm answering a question, someone does it while you are responding to dispute what you are saying. Real life example of just a few days ago: "Is Africa a country"? "No, it is a continent made up of various countries like Kenya, Tanzania..." I did not get to explain further because the person who asked me began shouting a rebuttal.
 
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arturo

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You mean capital.

But cibaeño is a dialect in the true sense. Therefore, capitai,hablai, bebei.....are all examples of characteristics of this regional form of speech.
Quiero fritos (tostones) con mi pollo guisao. Voy al colmao a lao de mi casa.

I kind of like the sureña way of speaking in Azua, Ocoa etc: surrrreña
 

Marianopolita

Moderator Spanish Forum
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Quiero fritos (tostones) con mi pollo guisao. Voy al colmao a lao de mi casa.

I kind of like the sureña way of speaking in Azua, Ocoa etc: surrrreña

That is Caribbean Spanish (suppression of the d) not specifically cibaeño.

I like the accent from Baní. I am not sure why but maybe because it is very similar to other southern accents in the Caribbean Antilles.
 
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Marianopolita

Moderator Spanish Forum
Dec 26, 2003
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Hijepucha, esa nena es mi traga; ella me tiene loco de tusa! - but I agree with the yelling thing.

I find it most annoying when, while I'm answering a question, someone does it while you are responding to dispute what you are saying. Real life example of just a few days ago: "Is Africa a country"? "No, it is a continent made up of various countries like Kenya, Tanzania..." I did not get to explain further because the person who asked me began shouting a rebuttal.

Shouting when speaking to people is falta de educación. Depending on who you are speaking to you should know whether or not this will happen. It has to do with the sociolect. There are exceptions to every rule but in general terms you can predict this behaviour from certain people. Spanish specifically allows for so many opportunities to convey politeness without even saying por favor. Avoid these situations to the best your ability.
 

arturo

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Mar 14, 2002
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Shouting when speaking to people is falta de educación. Depending on who you are speaking to you should know whether or not this will happen. It has to do with the sociolect. There are exceptions to every rule but in general terms you can predict this behaviour from certain people. Spanish specifically allows for so many opportunities to convey politeness without even saying por favor. Avoid these situations to the best your ability.
I agree completely.