Vicioso: One of the Original Last Names of SD?

NALs

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Some last names are generic and without more documentation it is impossible to know which line is it. Such is the csse with García which I wouldn't be surprised if every city, town, village and csmpo has at least one person with the last name Garcia. Then there are other last names that are less frequent and limited to certain areas, such as Bencosme. Other last names have multiple origins and one person may not be related in a distant way to another person with the same last name. Examples would be Mejía which has existed in the DR since the 16th century, but Hipólito Mejía can trace back to a Spaniard from the Canary Islands that settled in the DR in the 17th century, nothing to do with the earlier Mejía. Another case would be José Francisco Peña Gómez who was adopted by a Dominican family. His parents were both Haitians and his non-adopted name was Oggi Pie.

With that said, some last names are believed to first appear in a place at a certain time and later new investigations discover the last nsme has been present since before that, even if new lines appeared in later centuries from immigration by people with the same last name and had nothing to do with those of the same last name who can trace their ancestry back to when the last name first appeared in the country.

That's the case with Vicioso. One of the original last nsmes of Santo Domingo? Existed in the city at least since the 16th century (which is basically the beginning)!

Last night I was reading a old out-of-print Dominican book by E. Demorizi, in this case regarding the devastations of Osorio in 1605-1606. There is a list of people from Santo Domingo who were accussed by Governor Antonio Osorio. The one and only highlighted in yellow. All these people were adults at that time, so they have been living, many or most or all born, in Santo Domingo since the 16th century (1500's). There are further explanations in the footnotes of the book regarding some people, but not him. Not that the following matters, but everyone that wasn't white had their description after their names (mulatto, indio, etc) or a further description in the footnotes such as number 48.

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bachata

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I always thought my last name was original from Moca but just this week found out that the last registered person in my family tree was original from Santiago who migrated to Moca.
 

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Naked_Snake

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Some last names are generic and without more documentation it is impossible to know which line is it. Such is the csse with García which I wouldn't be surprised if every city, town, village and csmpo has at least one person with the last name Garcia. Then there are other last names that are less frequent and limited to certain areas, such as Bencosme. Other last names have multiple origins and one person may not be related in a distant way to another person with the same last name. Examples would be Mejía which has existed in the DR since the 16th century, but Hipólito Mejía can trace back to a Spaniard from the Canary Islands that settled in the DR in the 17th century, nothing to do with the earlier Mejía. Another case would be José Francisco Peña Gómez who was adopted by a Dominican family. His parents were both Haitians and his non-adopted name was Oggi Pie.

With that said, some last names are believed to first appear in a place at a certain time and later new investigations discover the last nsme has been present since before that, even if new lines appeared in later centuries from immigration by people with the same last name and had nothing to do with those of the same last name who can trace their ancestry back to when the last name first appeared in the country.

That's the case with Vicioso. One of the original last nsmes of Santo Domingo? Existed in the city at least since the 16th century (which is basically the beginning)!

Last night I was reading a old out-of-print Dominican book by E. Demorizi, in this case regarding the devastations of Osorio in 1605-1606. There is a list of people from Santo Domingo who were accussed by Governor Antonio Osorio. The one and only highlighted in yellow. All these people were adults at that time, so they have been living, many or most or all born, in Santo Domingo since the 16th century (1500's). There are further explanations in the footnotes of the book regarding some people, but not him. Not that the following matters, but everyone that wasn't white had their description after their names (mulatto, indio, etc) or a further description in the footnotes such as number 48.

View attachment 6653
I suspect my paternal family (the Lozanos) are the very same ones mentioned on that book smuggling in the area between Bayaha and Monte Cristi. Seems they never left the area until the XXth century (some of the folks even joined Marti and Gomez' expedition to liberate Cuba, imagine).
 

NALs

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Most of that area is in modern day Haiti, though it wasn't Haiti, Saint-Domingue or anything else not Spanish since that was during the 200 years when the entire island belong to Spain.
 

AlterEgo

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There is a ton of information online, including family trees. I recently found a new site, Geneanet. I was pretty shocked to find my own name on one of them, as my husband is a descendant of this man. Busy guy 🤗 Florentina Blanchard was a French woman born in Banica (Haitian border), the family fled to Santo Domingo for safety when Haiti invaded DR
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NALs

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Since 1929 Bánica has been practically on the border, but before that the border was further west into what is now Haitian territory.

The following is from the Spanish translation by C. Armando Rodríguez of Dessaline's Santo Domingo Campaign Diary of 1805 (the original diary is in French and was in Port-au-Prince, who knows if it was lost in the 2010 earthquake.)

"On [February] 22 [,1805] the [Haitian] army left Las Caobas [then a Spanish town, Haitian today] to march towards Las Matas [de Farfán]... On March 3, the Emperor [Dessalines] received a delegation. Entered the town by noon and allowed the [Haitian] troops to rest."
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Since Bánica is between those two towns but further north, Dessaline's army most likely took control of the town within the end of February and the beginning of March 1805.

What did the Haitian troops did to those captured in the town (many descendants of Dominicans)? Well...

"On February 25 the artilleries were reviewed on orders of the generals Lys and Montblanc (not the watches, lol)... His Majesty [aka Dessalines] gave the order to all the generals that occupied the towns [on the Dominican side] to capture all the inhabitants and deprive them of their liberty, so that on [Dessalines] first orders they will be subjected to be trampled by the mules and other animals once they arrive to the Haitian part..."
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Oh, there is more...

"On virtue of the last orders given by His Majesty to various generals, they pushed before them the rest of the inhabitants, their animals and horses.

...All the towns, cities, campos, etc were burned to the ground, devastation was taken to everywhere... and no one's life were spared except the individuals choosen by His Majesty to be taken as prisoners [to the west]."

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This would make one heck of a movie, except it would be based on actual events.


It goes without saying that if there were Vicioso's in SD during the 1500's, then SD has had Vicioso's during practically every historical event that affected the city including the Haitian invasion of 1805 described above. Would DR1 ever be created if Dessalines was successful in taking over SD in 1805? It goes without saying that in this case there are no current Vicioso's if the ones living in SD in 1805 would had been entirely killed by Dessalines and his army. He did promised to "bury the inhabitants in the ruins of their capital." I would even doubt most if not all expats participating in this website would be living on Hispaniola right now.
 
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bachata

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I have French blood but I can trace my family roots of the Arnaud family in Moca just two generations. I know my family in the Rojas Arnaud side is related to the Morin family too.

JJ
 

NALs

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I have French blood but I can trace my family roots of the Arnaud family in Moca just two generations. I know my family in the Rojas Arnaud side is related to the Morin family too.

JJ
Rojas is a very old last name in Santiago. This from from Dr Alejando Llenas "Invasiones Haitianas" regarding one of the events in Santiago during the invasion in 1805.

"On February 26 the honorables Francisco Raimundo Campo, Francisco Escoto, José de Rojas, José Núñez, Juan Curiel, Juan Núñez, N. Delmonte, Norberto Álvarez, Antonio Rodríguez y Blas Almonte were hanged on the portals of town hall (west of the Plaza de Armas - today Parque Duarte)...

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bachata

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Rojas is a very old last name in Santiago. This from from Dr Alejando Llenas "Invasiones Haitianas" regarding one of the events in Santiago during the invasion in 1805.

"On February 26 the honorables Francisco Raimundo Campo, Francisco Escoto, José de Rojas, José Núñez, Juan Curiel, Juan Núñez, N. Delmonte, Norberto Álvarez, Antonio Rodríguez y Blas Almonte were hanged on the portals of town hall (west of the Plaza de Armas - today Parque Duarte)...

View attachment 6665
They were hanged? Why if they was honorable people.

JJ
 

NALs

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Probably because they were members of the city government. They were hanged by the Haitian soldiers on the orders of Henri Christophe. That's the same Henri Christophe that built a palace in Milot, Haiti. Though now in ruins, some still stands.
 

bachata

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Oh okay, so the Haitians hanged my ancestors...
Pueblo que olvida su pasado está condenado a repetirlo!

JJ
 
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NALs

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Oh okay, so the Haitians hanged my ancestors...
Pueblo que olvida su pasado está condenado a repetirlo!

JJ
The Haitian army and some generals of that time can be blamed. The Haitian people overall didn't know what the Haitian army was up to in the eastern part. If anything, there are indications that the multiple invasions of the Dominicans tended to be unpopular among the public opinion from over there.

There were also many leaders, many of which lead various invasions, that were very self-centered and declared themselves "emperor for life" or "king for life," etc. They also ruled out of a whim and without concerning what was the actual will of the people or public opinion, very often they did the complete opposite which was a clear demonstration they didn't really care about the people and simply about themselves.Some of these people are held as some sort of "heroes" in Haiti mostly because the focus is on what they considered to be good, but the actual men were not entirely exemplary.

Take Henri Christophe as an example. Many places are named after him in Haiti, even the university that was built by orders of Leonel Fernández in Limonade has his name (choosen by them, not the Dominicans or the Dominican governments.) Of his many very grave faults, it seems they are simply "forgotten." One of the more beningn faults of Henri Christophe was his self-centeredness. Many point to the ruins of the palace he built in Milot with some sort of pride. In order for that to happen, you have to ignore how was it possible that a country that at that time didn't received any type of improvements of the public roads, public education, public sanitation, etc form the royal government that declared itself in charge of the Kingdom of Haiti (northern Haiti) with Henri Christophe as the only king of anywhere on Hispaniola since Columbus arrived in 1492. How is it that this government that simply taxed the people and never return not even a small part in services or improved infrastructure/goods found the money to create such a lavish palace for the king? It turns out, everything Henri Christophe took from the people in taxes was destined for his personal expense. Oh yes, he lived in the lap of luxury and grandour, he and only him. One could point to other leaders and complaint they didn't invest enough in the country, but at least they invested something. He invested nothing. He was basically a thief in the full sense of the word and that is one of his faults. It was all for him, about him, and only he who mattered.

With that said, there are certain things that do rub the wrong way. While there is nothing for the Haitian people to at least give an official opology to Dominicans for all the troubles that was created during the multiple invasions, ths same can't be said about the Haitian government. What a representative of the Haitian government said a few years ago thst Haiti has nothing to forgive itself to Dominicans is complete nonsense. It was under its name that many of those things were done. The people of Haiti have nothing to forgive, but the government of Haiti does and there is no way around that.
 

NanSanPedro

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Apr 12, 2019
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The Haitian army and some generals of that time can be blamed. The Haitian people overall didn't know what the Haitian army was up to in the eastern part. If anything, there are indications that the multiple invasions of the Dominicans tended to be unpopular among the public opinion from over there.

There were also many leaders, many of which lead various invasions, that were very self-centered and declared themselves "emperor for life" or "king for life," etc. They also ruled out of a whim and without concerning what was the actual will of the people or public opinion, very often they did the complete opposite which was a clear demonstration they didn't really care about the people and simply about themselves.Some of these people are held as some sort of "heroes" in Haiti mostly because the focus is on what they considered to be good, but the actual men were not entirely exemplary.

Take Henri Christophe as an example. Many places are named after him in Haiti, even the university that was built by orders of Leonel Fernández in Limonade has his name (choosen by them, not the Dominicans or the Dominican governments.) Of his many very grave faults, it seems they are simply "forgotten." One of the more beningn faults of Henri Christophe was his self-centeredness. Many point to the ruins of the palace he built in Milot with some sort of pride. In order for that to happen, you have to ignore how was it possible that a country that at that time didn't received any type of improvements of the public roads, public education, public sanitation, etc form the royal government that declared itself in charge of the Kingdom of Haiti (northern Haiti) with Henri Christophe as the only king of anywhere on Hispaniola since Columbus arrived in 1492. How is it that this government that simply taxed the people and never return not even a small part in services or improved infrastructure/goods found the money to create such a lavish palace for the king? It turns out, everything Henri Christophe took from the people in taxes was destined for his personal expense. Oh yes, he lived in the lap of luxury and grandour, he and only him. One could point to other leaders and complaint they didn't invest enough in the country, but at least they invested something. He invested nothing. He was basically a thief in the full sense of the word and that is one of his faults. It was all for him, about him, and only he who mattered.

With that said, there are certain things that do rub the wrong way. While there is nothing for the Haitian people to at least give an official opology to Dominicans for all the troubles that was created during the multiple invasions, ths same can't be said about the Haitian government. What a representative of the Haitian government said a few years ago thst Haiti has nothing to forgive itself to Dominicans is complete nonsense. It was under its name that many of those things were done. The people of Haiti have nothing to forgive, but the government of Haiti does and there is no way around that.
One more thing on San Souci and the Citadelle in Milot, they were built by Haitian slaves for Haitian masters.
 

NALs

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Very interesting. NALS here’s the note on Florentina Blanchard’s record.

View attachment 6664
In essence, here is one more mention of what Dessalines plans were for Santo Domingo and the entire Spanish part (now the DR).

If you think about it, what he wanted was that your current husband and kids would had never been born, along with most of the current Dominicans (notice it also mention the destruction of the "the whites and free Spaniards," that second part unquestionably is referring Dominicans mixed race and black ancestors, not just the white ones). Had it been a success, hardly any modern Dominicans would've had the chance to exist. Or another way to look at it, the fact there are Dominicans today is due to the failure of the Haitian invasion of 1805.

This also applies to many expats that hsve Dominican spouses and/or half-Dominican kids since their existince would had been 100% impossible if their ancestors would had been destroyed by Dessalines in 1805. Very few people in the Western Hemisphere had their very own existence in question at the time of an invasion, because almost all invasions that has taken place in the Americas didn't imply the massacre of the entire population if it was successful. At the very least, today they may speak a different language and/or have alligiance to different political entities or countries. With Dominicans, not even that would had been possible had the Haitian invasion of 1805 been a success from the prt of the invaders.

These excerpts are from Ferrand explaining in details the entire siege of Santo Domingo by the Haitians in 1805.

In addition, the Colonial Zone that many expats like to the point many spend most or all of their time in this sector when in Santo Domingo, was to be completely destroyed after the massacre of the entire population. The Cathedral? Calle El Conde? Fortaleza Ozama? Casa de Tostado?

Imagine, no way for expats currently living in the DR to have ever been expats in the DR or even for DR1.com to eventually be created (unless it would had created itself out of thin air). lol

The Inquire (Richmond, Virginia, USA); October 29, 1805; p 2.

383CE784-CB6E-43C7-A00C-89F8D6AF804C.jpeg



4F59560E-B9C8-4F51-B163-DEF9D25991BC.jpeg


The hell a million times to Dessalines and only to him since the entire responsibility of this falls squarely on his feet!
 
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AlterEgo

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Jan 9, 2009
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In essence, here is one more mention of what Dessalines plans were for Santo Domingo and the entire Spanish part (now the DR).

If you think about it, what he wanted was that your current husband and kids would had never been born, along with most of the current Dominicans (notice it also mention the destruction of the "the whites and free Spaniards," that second part unquestionably is referring Dominicans mixed race and black ancestors, not just the white ones). Had it been a success, hardly any modern Dominicans would've had the chance to exist. Or another way to look at it, the fact there are Dominicans today is due to the failure of the Haitian invasion of 1805.

This also applies to many expats that hsve Dominican spouses and/or half-Dominican kids since their existince would had been 100% impossible if their ancestors would had been destroyed by Dessalines in 1805. Very few people in the Western Hemisphere had their very own existence in question at the time of an invasion, because almost all invasions that has taken place in the Americas didn't imply the massacre of the entire population if it was successful. At the very least, today they may speak a different language and/or have alligiance to different political entities or countries. With Dominicans, not even that would had been possible had the Haitian invasion of 1805 been a success from the prt of the invaders.

These excerpts are from Ferrand explaining in details the entire siege of Santo Domingo by the Haitians in 1805.

In addition, the Colonial Zone that many expats like to the point many spend most or all of their time in this sector when in Santo Domingo, was to be completely destroyed after the massacre of the entire population. The Cathedral? Calle El Conde? Fortaleza Ozama? Casa de Tostado?

Imagine, no way for expats currently living in the DR to have ever been expats in the DR or even for DR1.com to eventually be created (unless it would had created itself out of thin air). lol

The Inquire (Richmond, Virginia, USA); October 29, 1805; p 2.

View attachment 6673


View attachment 6674

The hell a million times to Dessalines and only to him since the entire responsibility of this falls squarely on his feet!
Every time I read accounts like this, I’m horrified at the savagery. And you’re right, all of my husband’s ancestors were in DR prior to 1805. (Santo Domingo and Montecristi). He wouldn’t exist if they’d succeeded.