What about televisions?

Aug 6, 2006
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AS I suppose everyone knows, all TVs for use in the US are made for digital signals, while in the DR, the old NTSC tuner is needed.
I know that for a while, TVs came with both NTSC and ATSC tuners, and when you turned on the TV ans connected the antenna, the TV would first seek NTSC signals and then ATSC (digital) signals, and them, program itself for what was available.
My question is this: are TVs now sold in the US still equipped with both kinds of tuner, or have they stopped making them with NTSC tuners for sale in the US?
I can't seem to find out on the Internet. Now Smart TVs are available in the US and I have seen 24 in refurbs available on sale for as little as U$135.

Perhaps someone who has recently brought a TV to the DR from the US or Canada can answer this.
 

franco1111

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May 29, 2013
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AS I suppose everyone knows, all TVs for use in the US are made for digital signals, while in the DR, the old NTSC tuner is needed.
I know that for a while, TVs came with both NTSC and ATSC tuners, and when you turned on the TV ans connected the antenna, the TV would first seek NTSC signals and then ATSC (digital) signals, and them, program itself for what was available.
My question is this: are TVs now sold in the US still equipped with both kinds of tuner, or have they stopped making them with NTSC tuners for sale in the US?
I can't seem to find out on the Internet. Now Smart TVs are available in the US and I have seen 24 in refurbs available on sale for as little as U$135.

Perhaps someone who has recently brought a TV to the DR from the US or Canada can answer this.
I have brought several televisions here from the U.S. in the last couple years. Most recently, two months ago.

All work with analog signal in La Romana and nearby areas. Using Tricom and Aster analog. And, of course with digital (Direct TV). Brands include LG, Samsung, and Vizio.
 
Aug 6, 2006
8,750
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Thanks!
I read where some cable stations are still using NTSC, so I guess that NTSC tuners are included with all new sets, in addition to ATSC.
 

greydread

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Jan 3, 2007
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AS I suppose everyone knows, all TVs for use in the US are made for digital signals, while in the DR, the old NTSC tuner is needed.
I know that for a while, TVs came with both NTSC and ATSC tuners, and when you turned on the TV ans connected the antenna, the TV would first seek NTSC signals and then ATSC (digital) signals, and them, program itself for what was available.
My question is this: are TVs now sold in the US still equipped with both kinds of tuner, or have they stopped making them with NTSC tuners for sale in the US?
I can't seem to find out on the Internet. Now Smart TVs are available in the US and I have seen 24 in refurbs available on sale for as little as U$135.

Perhaps someone who has recently brought a TV to the DR from the US or Canada can answer this.
Answer: No. NTSC tuners were discontinued in 2006 in new sets over 25" and for all sets manufactured and sold after 2007 and in 2009 all analog OTA transmission ceased. Most of the remaining sets with analog tuners can be picked up at pawn shops for $50 or less or you can buy an analog tuner (standalone) for chump change.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Mini-NTSC-P...42be688&pid=100338&rk=4&rkt=8&sd=311213698488


from Wiki:
United States government mandates[edit]
Main article: Digital television transition in the United States
The FCC has issued the following mandates for devices entering the US:[1][2][3]

By July 1, 2005 all televisions with screen sizes over 36 inches (91 cm) must include a built-in ATSC DTV tuner
By March 1, 2006 all televisions with screen sizes over 25 inches (64 cm) must include a built-in ATSC DTV tuner
By March 1, 2007 all televisions regardless of screen size, and all interface devices that include a tuner (VCR, DVD player/recorder, DVR) must include a built-in ATSC DTV tuner.
It should be noted that devices manufactured before these dates can still be sold without a built-in ATSC DTV tuner; the lack of digital tuners legally must be disclosed to consumers and most name-brand retailers have incurred onerous FCC penalties for non-compliance with these requirements.[4]

The current regulations are specified in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR).[5]

Analog TV broadcast switch-off[edit]
For Low-Power Television Stations, see Digital television transition in the United States.
In early 2006 the US Deficit Reduction Act of 2005[6] became law, which calls for full power over-the-air television stations to cease their analog broadcasts by February 17, 2009[7] (this cut-off date had been moved several times previously). On February 11, 2009[8] the mandatory DTV broadcast date was moved again to June 12, 2009, although stations were allowed to switch earlier. The delay enabled distribution of more coupons for purchase of converter boxes.[9]

Since June 12, 2009, TVs and other equipment with legacy NTSC tuners are unable to receive over-the-air broadcasts from United States TV stations, unless the broadcast is from a repeater or low-power transmitter. Canada has a similar analogue TV termination date set to September 1, 2011 (except in some remote northern regions).

It was feared that the US switch-off would cause millions of non-cable- and non-satellite-connected TV sets to "go dark". Viewers who did not upgrade, either to a television with a digital tuner or a set-top box, ended up losing their only source of television, unless they relied only upon the aforementioned non-full-power broadcasters. A Congressional bill authorized subsidized converter boxes in a way that allowed viewers to receive the new digital broadcasts on their old TVs. The actual transition proceeded smoothly with about 235,000 people requesting coupons after the June 12, 2009 transition date.[10]

Two $40 coupons were made available per US address[11] nominally from January 1, 2008 through March 31, 2009; each coupon could be used toward the purchase of one approved coupon-eligible converter box. The coupons expired 90 days after initial mailing and were not renewable. All households were eligible to receive coupons from the initial $990 million allocated, after which an additional $510 million in coupons was to be available to households that rely exclusively on over-the-air television reception. On January 4, 2009 the coupon program reached its $1.34 billion ceiling[12] and any further consumer requests were placed on a waiting list.[13]
 
Aug 6, 2006
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If a TV set can be bought for $50 at a pawn shop, then the $43 listed on e bay is hardly chump change.
How can I tell if a TV has an NTSC tuner? I want a 24" or smaller set.
Two years ago I bought a Coby 19" set that had not been used, in the box, for $80. It had both tuners built in.
 

windeguy

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Jul 10, 2004
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From the detailed information above, apparently you would have to purchase a rather old TV since none of them made after 2007 have the tuner you desire.
 

greydread

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Jan 3, 2007
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If a TV set can be bought for $50 at a pawn shop, then the $43 listed on e bay is hardly chump change.
How can I tell if a TV has an NTSC tuner? I want a 24" or smaller set.
Two years ago I bought a Coby 19" set that had not been used, in the box, for $80. It had both tuners built in.
There were a few TV receivers sold which had both NTSC and ATSC tuning capability during the transition. Forgive my tendency to refer to electronic devices under $50 as "chump change" but in the world of gadgetry that doesn't represent a whole lot of money. I only mentioned the NTSC standalone tuner route because it's a lot easier to transport and can be used with your PC as well as TV (most have HDMI output and some have USB out). Apparently the D.R. decided to skip SD and HD altogether and save their reinvestment money for the coming UHD transition. Smart...very smart. The 4K standard opposed to 480/720/1080i&p makes more sense, offers superior resolution, requires less bandwidth and will standardize broadcasting to TV sets, pads, pods, phones, laptops and PCs worldwide for the 1st time ever. This is a good thing. Now if we could only replace 24 hour news networks with educational programming...
 

spmc

New member
Nov 7, 2008
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The tuners are commodity ICs.
https://www.maximintegrated.com/en/products/comms/wireless-rf/MAX3543.html

I will go out on a limb and say even a new smart TV can probably receive the analog signals. Just call the manufacturer and ask.

On a releated note, I bought my first Smart TV in January without knowing (or previously caring) about Smart TVs. The most important thing in regards to a Smart TV is that it have an Andriod operating system, not a proprietary OS like Samsung. Yes, I have a Samsung :0.
 

franco1111

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May 29, 2013
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Yes those tv's I brought are all 24" - and they do work with analog signal. I bring them as gifts. So, if you want 24" as you say, I think if you bring from U.S it will work. Greybeard says NTSC tuner was eliminated on sets over 25".
 

spmc

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Nov 7, 2008
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The 25" TV had to have an ATSC tuner, not eliminate the NTSC tuner. Go find a new 24" TV for under $100 and then call the manufacturer if you have concerns over receiving analog signals.
 

greydread

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Jan 3, 2007
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There was no requirement to eliminate NTSC, so some if not all TVs could still have them.
The FCC mandate was the elimination of OTA broadcasts. Cable continued to deliver analog for years and in some areas still does.

The bandwidth required to broadcast HD has been the big problem which is why Quadrature Amplitude Modulation was adapted for use by cable providers. The UHD 4K broadcast standard delivers almost 3x the information using smaller bandwidth. Looking at a game in UHD 4K is like watching it through the window of the broadcast booth. Looking at the same game in UHD 8K is like removing the window.
 

greydread

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Jan 3, 2007
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Yes those tv's I brought are all 24" - and they do work with analog signal. I bring them as gifts. So, if you want 24" as you say, I think if you bring from U.S it will work. Greybeard says NTSC tuner was eliminated on sets over 25".
greydread stated that the FCC mandated the manufacture of ATSC compatible tuners on sets over 25".

freako1111 just in case you can read:

https://www.fcc.gov/general/digital-television
 

franco1111

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May 29, 2013
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greydread stated that the FCC mandated the manufacture of ATSC compatible tuners on sets over 25".

freako1111 just in case you can read:

https://www.fcc.gov/general/digital-television
I'm not arguing with what you say. I thought what you said supported the fact that the 24" tv's I bring to the DR work with analog signal.

Here is what you said in #5, "NTSC tuners were discontinued in 2006 in new sets over 25" and for all sets manufactured and sold after 2007..." That would seem to say tv's 25" and smaller very well could still have NTSC tuners, which allow them to work with analog signal.

All I was saying is the 24" tv's I bring here work with analog signals in the La Romana area. The Aster service is clearly analog - no cable box needed, etc. And the Tricom service in the older condo complex clearly says analog when the tv is turned on, and no cable box needed.

The conclusion is that you can bring 24" tv's here from U.S. and they work with analog service. That was the OP's question.
 
Aug 6, 2006
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I have located a refurb 24" Vizeo smart TV for a good price, but I did not want to buy it unless it could be used in the DR.