What does basiladera...............

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Jennyfurry

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y la gosadera mean? Never heard these words. Someone told me it is a word for a party animal, but not so sure.

THANKS!
 
Feb 7, 2007
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gosadera from word gozar - to have fun, to party ... so it could translate as funhaving and partying
 

Rocky

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Basiladera is do do with motion/dancing/place of dance/vacillation.
No doubt, related to
vac?il?late? (lāt′)
intransitive verb
  1. to sway to and fro; waver; totter; stagger
  2. to fluctuate or oscillate
  3. to waver in mind; show indecision
 

Rocky

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Probably also related to "basil?n"....and related to having fun...

HB
I'm sure it is.
It seems to have many meanings, depending on the context.
We need a born & bred Dominican who speaks perfect English to know them all.
Our employees here had so many variances of it that my head was spinning,
 

miguel

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Muchas....

Yes, it has A LOT of definitons BUTTTT in "Dominican Spanish" it means to have fun, to party, to go dancing, to party like a party ANIMALAZOOOOO.

The Conjunto Quisqueya said it best:

"Vamos a formar un basilon, ustedes traen el ron y nosotros el sabor". (Or something in those lines).
 
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Rocky

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Yes, it has A LOT of definitons BUTTTT in "Dominican Spanish" it means to have fun, to party, to go dancing, to party like a party ANIMALAZOOOOO.

The Conjunto Quisqueya said it best:

"Vamos a formar un basilon, ustedes traen el ron y nosotros el sabor".
Thank you sir.
 

Jennyfurry

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Thanks

These are the words that my boyfriend's ex used in a text message yesterday in which she told him that the life he is living with me now is not his because his life is that of a party animal---that his tranquilo is not who he really is and that he really wants to be out dancing and drinking like he used to do. I asked him to tell me what that meant and that was what he said, but I just wanted to check. Apparently everyone in his life thinks this lately. They have all had their say about it so I guess eventually she would take her turn too. I will never understand why dancing and drinking is so vital to the life of a Dominican and why it makes up ones identity.

Anyway, thanks for your help.
 

Rocky

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These are the words that my boyfriend's ex used in a text message yesterday in which she told him that the life he is living with me now is not his because his life is that of a party animal---that his tranquilo is not who he really is and that he really wants to be out dancing and drinking like he used to do. I asked him to tell me what that meant and that was what he said, but I just wanted to check. Apparently everyone in his life thinks this lately. They have all had their say about it so I guess eventually she would take her turn too. I will never understand why dancing and drinking is so vital to the life of a Dominican and why it makes up ones identity.

Anyway, thanks for your help.
Dancing is an integral part of Dominican culture, IMHO.
 

bob saunders

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I will never understand why dancing and drinking is so vital to the life of a Dominican and why it makes up ones identity.

Anyway, thanks for your help.

This statement may be true about many Dominicans, but I'd say the percentage of party animals is no different that North America or Europe. I know hundreds of Dominicans that love to dance but don't drink, and I know many that neither drink or dance very much or very often; whose main focus is on their education, their family or their career.
 

miguel

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Escucha....

These are the words that my boyfriend's ex used in a text message yesterday in which she told him that the life he is living with me now is not his because his life is that of a party animal---that his tranquilo is not who he really is and that he really wants to be out dancing and drinking like he used to do. I asked him to tell me what that meant and that was what he said, but I just wanted to check. Apparently everyone in his life thinks this lately. They have all had their say about it so I guess eventually she would take her turn too. I will never understand why dancing and drinking is so vital to the life of a Dominican and why it makes up ones identity.

Anyway, thanks for your help.
Just think what his ex and "everyone" are trying to say....Read between the lines.....They know him best.

Anyways, what I and others have said is what "basilar" means.
 

Marianopolita

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Dec 26, 2003
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Spelling is still a problem-

I find it interesting that no one commented on the incorrect spelling of words throughout this thread. Excluding the OP who was not familiar with the words in question, all posts that follow have incorrect spelling. In order to find any word in a dictionary and further indication of its possible meanings requires correct spelling. As mentioned in many posts spelling in general in the DR is linked to a poor education system but when it persists among people who have the opportunity to spell correctly in Spanish, IMO, it's worth mentioning.

Spelling in Spanish is very easy as compared to English, French and other languages since it's phonetically based. The only letter that's written and not pronounced is /h/. Words that have /b/ and /v/ or start with these letters pose problems for many although it should not. Other problematic letters include /z/, /c/ and /s/. One will often find many spelling errors that have these letters.

To those who are interested, please don't get into to habit of spelling incorrectly in Spanish. It's shows poor knowledge and gives one the impression that your systematic understanding of the language is subpar. Dictionaries go into detail about the alphabet, spelling and pronunciation of words and letters in Spanish either at the very beginning or end of the dictionary. The dictionary also explains how to decipher the usage of /b/ and /v/ when spelling words. As well, there are great references that focus on spelling and accentuation.

The correct spelling should be:

Vacil?n (verb- vacilar)

Gozadera (verb- gozar)

Vaciladera- -if you choose to use this word that is part of the Dominican vernacular. Not one that I would particularly use.



-LDG.
 

Rocky

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I find it interesting that no one commented on the incorrect spelling of words throughout this thread. Excluding the OP who was not familiar with the words in question, all posts that follow have incorrect spelling. In order to find any word in a dictionary and further indication of its possible meanings requires correct spelling. As mentioned in many posts spelling in general in the DR is linked to a poor education system but when it persists among people who have the opportunity to spell correctly in Spanish, IMO, it's worth mentioning.

Spelling in Spanish is very easy as compared to English, French and other languages since it's phonetically based. The only letter that's written and not pronounced is /h/. Words that have /b/ and /v/ or start with these letters pose problems for many although it should not. Other problematic letters include /z/, /c/ and /s/. One will often find many spelling errors that have these letters.

To those who are interested, please don't get into to habit of spelling incorrectly in Spanish. It's shows poor knowledge and gives one the impression that your systematic understanding of the language is subpar. Dictionaries go into detail about the alphabet, spelling and pronunciation of words and letters in Spanish either at the very beginning or end of the dictionary. The dictionary also explains how to decipher the usage of /b/ and /v/ when spelling words. As well, there are great references that focus on spelling and accentuation.

The correct spelling should be:

Vacil?n (verb- vacilar)

Gozadera (verb- gozar)

Vaciladera- -if you choose to use this word that is part of the Dominican vernacular. Not one that I would particularly use.



-LDG.
How can there be a correct spelling for a word that's not a real word?
Anyhow, in post 3, I did point out that it was related to "vacilate".
 

Marianopolita

Moderator Spanish Forum
Dec 26, 2003
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Colloquial meaning elsewhere-

It is a real word BUT a colloquialism in another country. That's why I said I won't use it due to having to specify the context. There are other words in Spanish that can convey the same meaning.

Notice how I said in the Dominican vernacular. Anyway just look it up in the rae.es. Here it is:


vaciladera.

1. f. coloq. Ven. Acci?n de vacilar (‖ tomar el pelo).



-LDG.
 

Chirimoya

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Dec 9, 2002
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Wasn't there a Latin Soul classic song called El Vacil?n?

I always understood 'vacilar' in the slang sense to mean strutting, swaggering or showing off.
 

Stodgord

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Nov 19, 2004
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Vacilar, vacil?n are words similar to the word vaina. They have a lot of meanings mostly related to fooling someone, having lots of fun and so on.
 

samanasuenos

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Oct 5, 2005
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He was telling you.......

y la gosadera mean? Never heard these words. Someone told me it is a word for a party animal, but not so sure.

THANKS!

I suspect a man told you that you were these things. ;) Could be he was telling ya that he liked the way ya were shakin it girlfriend. Maybe an inuendo, maybe not. As in shaking it on the dance floor and how ya might shake it elsewhere, if you catch my drift, dude. :)
 

montreal

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Wasn't there a Latin Soul classic song called El Vacil?n?

I always understood 'vacilar' in the slang sense to mean strutting, swaggering or showing off.


This is true, but in the DR "un vacil?n" is also a fun time.
I'm not sure if others countries use this representation of the word, but I dont think so (maybe PR ;) )
 

samanasuenos

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Oct 5, 2005
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Oops!

I suspect a man told you that you were these things. ;) Could be he was telling ya that he liked the way ya were shakin it girlfriend. Maybe an inuendo, maybe not. As in shaking it on the dance floor and how ya might shake it elsewhere, if you catch my drift, dude. :)
Sorry for not catching the context earlier.I was so eager to throw in my 2 pennies. Silly mi! Sorry!:ermm:

Okay JenFury - dancing is a huge part of many cultures - including the Irish!
Why he is getting messages from his ex is my first issue. ?!?

The content of her message is less important than the fact that she is contacing him, given my small and humble understanding of Dominican/latin dating and ex-dating rules.

Good luck, Sammy
 
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