what should I do when I retire there....?

amstellite

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Sep 5, 2007
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My plan is to retire in the DR in a few years...in the North near Villa Gonzales or Navarette... where I know some people... but what can I do? should I open a colmado? a bar? I should be ok money-wise, but an income , a small business, might help,.. any ideas ...? somethign simple... not involving anything too strenuous, even something charitable would work for me with no recompense.. I just want to fill my days somehow....
 

The Exterminator

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Jan 22, 2010
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Lend money on low rate...but Navarete...not the best city to retire, one of the most violent cities in the country

T.E.
 

Criss Colon

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yahoomail.com
"Amstel" I don't remember if you are a"Dominicano" or not?
If you are,and want to return to your "Roots" you may be "OK",and enjoy the "Campo"/"Barrio" Life.
It you are a "Gringo",then you will forever remain a "Gringo" no matter where you live,what you wear,and how much "salami" you eat.
Moving to the DR,to enjoy the "Simple Life",in the "Third World,is a "Pie-In-The-Sky" dream of many from the "First World".
In some cases,that "Dream",soon becomes a "nightmare"!
Being short on the "dinero" side makes life difficult in both of the above "scenarios".
Good Luck with your future here in the DR.
"Money,not only "Talks" here,it "Yells"!
Cris Colon
 

Expat13

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Jun 7, 2008
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Dont mean to semi highjack, but is a Colmado a good money making business here and if so are we talking good or modest living. I know it depends on the biz as always just curious in general
 

PeterInBrat

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May 29, 2006
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Dont mean to semi highjack, but is a Colmado a good money making business here and if so are we talking good or modest living. I know it depends on the biz as always just curious in general
I had the equivalent of a colmado in a village of about 500 in the Pacific Islands. I made a modest, but very reliable income on it, which would have been an above average income by local standards. It was only 8'x12' and even then, I was grossing US$2000+ a week with a 15%-20% mark-up. You'd have to do some footwork to get a good location and you might need to be your own distributor by making town runs.

In the DR, you would do well by buying dry goods in bulk and then using a reliable scale to sell many things in smaller units. The thing that would drive me nuts in the DR would be people wanting to 5 pesos worth of Corn Flakes or Tomato Paste.

Alternatively, you might be able to work the plastic "Jobber" strip market. This is where you work as an independent distributor who sells goods on "jobber" strips and other impulse buys. You see jobber strips all the time that have a dozen of some handy item or cheap toy on them. At one place I worked for, we did well selling lighters, car air fresheners, cheap toys, candy on strips(like lolipops), toy cars, hair ties, Alka-Seltzer, etc, etc, etc. We'd get toy "matchbox" cars in boxes of 20 for $6, wholesale them for $10 a box, and then they'd retail for $20 when sold one at a time. Basically, you buy in bulk from some 20 y 40 and then sell by the dozen to small shops.

This is what I mean by a jobber strip. Stores often use independent marketers to sell them to them full of items, a few strips at a time:



You can make your own jobber strips by tying a bunch of clothes pins to lengths of string.
 

LTSteve

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Jul 9, 2010
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If you have enough money to live on, than don't put your money in a grocery store. It is a business with long hours and a lot of headaches. Also if you do not have a least temporary residency, I believe, you will not be able to open a business in your name. If you like to work long hours, worry about employees and customers ripping you off, vendors who short change you than by all means pursue your dream.

LTS
 

frank12

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Sep 6, 2011
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If you have enough money to live on, than don't put your money in a grocery store. It is a business with long hours and a lot of headaches. Also if you do not have a least temporary residency, I believe, you will not be able to open a business in your name. If you like to work long hours, worry about employees and customers ripping you off, vendors who short change you than by all means pursue your dream.
LTS
Not to mention that many colmados operate on credit--the customers need credit, want credit, and will beg for credit. and then you have the headache of chasing them down to pay their bill. mind you, these are good people, friendly people, that are just trying to make it; they're scarsely getting by by a shoe-string budget. do you really want to be that guy chasing people--who only make $40 a week--down for money?

Not me. not in a million years. most of the people shopping at colmados are just barely getting by and the children come in hungry and looking at chocolate and bread they cannot afford, only to purchase a lottery ticket for their mom and dad trying to strike it rich.

In no time at all you'll feel like the Grinch who Stole Christmas.

It takes a very strong stomach to be in the colmado business in a third world country. you're surrounded by deep poverty and friendly people who have never tasted a Snicker's bar. The Haitians are friendly, the dominicans are friendly, the children are adorable, and you'll be sitting behind your counter watching people eye things that they have no way of paying for.

No thank you.

Frank
 

Givadogahome

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Sep 27, 2011
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The guy is looking for a hobby, something to keep him busy, something that will be productive.
My inlaws have run Colmados for 25years in the Campo and sustain a living and keep food on the table, and make visits to the doctors when need be, buy medicine when need be, help family out when need be, run a car (ok or sort) to run around the campo only and keep a nice roadworth vehicle for longer trips away to the beach every weekend. No intention of being a millionaire, no intention of opening a chain of super colmados all over the southcoast and taking over every street corner.
Simply making a living and getting on with being nice humble people.
Why does everything need to be so negative and difficult when it isn't. Some communities thrive on just that 'community', don't knock what you don't understand. General rules of business apply obviously, but don't make it sound like it is complicated, it isn't!!

I think a Colmado is a good idea!
But you will need strong connections around you, girlfriend and family you trust!
 
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keepcoming

Well-known member
May 25, 2011
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Agree about the colmado, it would be a full time job. We helped my spouses cousin open one and although our investment has almost been paid back it has taken 12 years!!!! He makes a ok living running it but he is there all the time. And yes people want to buy on credit and want 5 pesos of tomato paste etc...A headache.
Whether it be running a colamdo or loaning money, you are going to have be able to take a loss financially at times. Maybe teach a english class to some locals in your neighborhood for a small fee, or maybe tutor a student or 2. I had a friend that lived here for a couple of years who did that and while she did not make a ton of money she did make enough for some extra spending cash. Like you she was ok financially but a little extra never hurt. Agree with CC should be ok and will be ok are a huge difference. Making money to sustain someone here is NOT easy.
 

La Rubia

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Jan 1, 2010
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Lend money on low rate...but Navarete...not the best city to retire, one of the most violent cities in the country
Just to add my two cents on Navarrette, the violence comes in at times of strikes, elections, etc. It is quite known for having hot heads, but campos around the area are typically quite tranquilo. When there is going to be a strike in Navarrette, you've got to be prepared to respect the strike, stay inside, stock up ahead of time, etc. This can be problematic if you need medical care, or need to get places, otherwise can be weathered.

The campos are by no means "ex-pat" havens. You can anticipate living a quiet life, IF you are committed to integrating into the community, and understand the logistics of campo life. Mormons have a presence in Navarrette which sets the tone for the town's perception of gringos. There was a library built by the first lady, you could check out what sort of help they could use.

IMHO, the Cibao has the capitol and coastal areas beat in terms of safety, but then I'm just not a fan of the capitol, period.
 

Deyvi

*** I love DR1 ***
Dec 23, 2009
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"Amstel" I don't remember if you are a"Dominicano" or not?
If you are,and want to return to your "Roots" you may be "OK",and enjoy the "Campo"/"Barrio" Life.
It you are a "Gringo",then you will forever remain a "Gringo" no matter where you live,what you wear,and how much "salami" you eat.
Moving to the DR,to enjoy the "Simple Life",in the "Third World,is a "Pie-In-The-Sky" dream of many from the "First World".
In some cases,that "Dream",soon becomes a "nightmare"!
Being short on the "dinero" side makes life difficult in both of the above "scenarios".
Good Luck with your future here in the DR.
"Money,not only "Talks" here,it "Yells"!
Cris Colon
Heed this advice!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! It is best to visit not to use your assets. Go and visit many parts of the country by all means. Enjoy. The DR is facing many problems. They rely on the US and Europe and have now cast of the IMF. Both the US and Europe have their own problems and will eventually realize the Carribean is no longer a Stratigec Area--but only a money drain with no return. Unless you have some property in the country, with family and are self suffient, find another place to retire. And when you do---let us all know. Wish I had a nickel for the gringos that want to operate a business and compete with a Dominican. The first visit from the tax man will put you out.
 

La Mariposa

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Jun 4, 2004
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The guy is looking for a hobby, something to keep him busy, something that will be productive.
My inlaws have run Colmados for 25years in the Campo and sustain a living and keep food on the table, and make visits to the doctors when need be, buy medicine when need be, help family out when need be, run a car (ok or sort) to run around the campo only and keep a nice roadworth vehicle for longer trips away to the beach every weekend. No intention of being a millionaire, no intention of opening a chain of super colmados all over the southcoast and taking over every street corner.
Simply making a living and getting on with being nice humble people.
Why does everything need to be so negative and difficult when it isn't. Some communities thrive on just that 'community', don't knock what you don't understand. General rules of business apply obviously, but don't make it sound like it is complicated, it isn't!!

I think a Colmado is a good idea!
But you will need strong connections around you, girlfriend and family you trust!
You said it '' the guy is looking for a hobby''. I don't think a colmado is a hobby, It's an esclavitud though